Tardis

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Tardis
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Triskadekaphobia was a Doctor Who Adventures comic story featuring the Tenth Doctor and Rose Tyler.

Summary[]

Escaping from the Speardroids, the Doctor, to convince Rose that their landings aren't cursed, selects their next destination using the randomiser ("satnav by lucky dip"). Unfortunately their destination is the 13th moon of the 13th planet of the 13th galaxy, on the 13th day of the 13th year in the 13th century... a Friday! They are struck by lightning, rained on by cats and meet the Triskaidekaphobes, the unluckiest people in the whole of creation, pilgrims trapped on this moon.

Finding a four-leaf clover on a small patch of lawn where Misery and Misfortune once stood, the Doctor begins to suspect that something is responsible for taking away any good luck that should occur. While the Doctor is lucky tossing a coin, he and Rose are transported to a ship hidden in the only rain cloud in the sky; it has been following them. There they find Bob Kreesus, a small, blue alien living in luxury on all the good fortune generated by his luck machine. The Doctor dismisses the luck as no more than "gamblers' superstition". The alien machine, powered by a quantum-powered processor, is the reason Bob has been fortunate. The Doctor destroys the machine and returns the missing Brotherhood, along with Bob, to the moon. The sun has started to shine again. Bob fails to heed the Doctor's warning about a discarded banana skin and falls off the edge of a cliff...unlucky!

Characters[]

References[]

Notes[]

  • This comic strip adventure in the thirteenth issue of the magazine was linked by an "unlucky for some" theme.
  • The DWA comic strip adventures were aimed at a younger audience and the artwork and colours was bold and bright, reflecting the tone of the magazine.
  • Self contained, one part stories were the norm in the early issues, later being expanded to two-parters.

Original print details[]

Publication with page count and closing captions
  1. DWA 13 (6 pages split 4/2) ANOTHER FANTASTIC ADVENTURE NEXT ISSUE!

Continuity[]

External links[]

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