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The Third Doctor, who was exiled by the Time Lords to Earth in the 20th century for a significant period of his life, was a distinguished man of high class and gadgetry, often tinkering away and privy with machines as he worked with Brigadier Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart as the UNIT scientific advisor, assisting the Brigadier and his UNIT troops Sergeant John Benton and Captain Mike Yates in their fight against invading aliens with his companions Liz Shaw, Jo Grant and Sarah Jane Smith.

The Doctor also liked to share his wisdom with those who had open minds, but his patience would quickly dissolve if something annoyed him. Those who got on his good side soon found him to be a friendly fellow, while those who were against him soon found that this gentleman could actually get physical and hold his own in a fight.

Biography[]

Main article: Third Doctor/Biography

Forced into an exile on Earth in the 20th century by the Time Lords, (TV: The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) with his TARDIS rendered inoperable, the Doctor allied himself with UNIT under Brigadier Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart, working as their scientific advisor, initially alongside Dr. Liz Shaw, (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) until she decided to return to the University of Cambridge to pursue her own work. (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) The Doctor often took exception to the Brigadier's military approach, especially concerning the outcome of the Wenley Moor Affair, just as the Brigadier was frequently irritated by the Doctor's air of superiority and seeming disregard for authority, (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) but they ultimately developed an easy mutual trust and strong friendship. (TV: Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).)

Following Liz's departure, the Doctor was given a new assistant named Jo Grant, who was as bubbly as she was unscientifically trained, but he developed a great fondness for her. No sooner had Jo arrived that the Doctor became entangled in an ongoing battle of wits against the Master, who also became stranded on Earth when the Doctor stole the dematerialisation circuit from the Master's TARDIS in an attempt to fix his own, (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) until he was forced to return it during the Stangmoor Incident. (TV: The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) However, the Master's attempt to ally with Axos forced him to ally with the Doctor, allowing him to trick his two foes into partially repairing his TARDIS, though with him stuck as a "galactic yo-yo" that would always have to return to his exile. (TV: The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).)

After the Master was finally arrested by UNIT following his failure to ally with the Dæmon Azal at Devil's End, (TV: The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) the Doctor found himself pushing the limits of exile as he travelled to an alternate future ruled by Daleks, (TV: Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) visited Peladon for the first time, (TV: The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) and was even recruited by the Time Lords for a mission on 30th century Solos. (TV: The Mutants [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) After the Master escaped his imprisonment with aid from the Sea Devils, (TV: The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) the Doctor and Jo ended up chasing him to Ancient Atlantis, where they stopped him harnessing the power of Kronos the Chronovore, though the Doctor allowed him to escape. (TV: The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).)

The Doctor's exile finally came to an end when the Time Lords united him with his first and second incarnations in the First Omega Crisis, with the Doctors' defeat of Omega in the anti-matter universe being rewarded with the Time Lords restoring the TARDIS to full working order. (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) The Doctor tried to celebrate his new freedom by taking Jo to Metebelis III, but they ended up getting side-tracked by misadventures (TV: Carnival of Monsters [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) like the Daleks' Spiridon campaign. (TV: Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) Eventually, Jo became homesick, (TV: Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) and a return trip to Earth saw her leave the TARDIS to marry scientist Clifford Jones after meeting him at Llanfairfach while the Doctor was on Metebelis III. The Doctor gave her a Metebelis crystal as a wedding gift. (TV: The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

The Doctor would then adventure alone, until he met journalist Sarah Jane Smith while saving UNIT associated scientists kidnapped to the 13th century by the Sontaran Linx. (TV: The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974).) While she first tried to leave his company due to initially being an accidental stowaway, her aid to him during Operation Golden Age, which saw Yates betray UNIT due to his political beliefs, encouraged them to continue to travel together, (TV: Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) visiting planets such as Exxilon, (TV: Death to the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) Florana (PROSE: The Hungry Bomb [+]Gareth Roberts, Doctor Who Yearbooks (1994).) and Peladon. (TV: The Monster of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

However, the Doctor's adventures came to an end when the Metebelis crystal was returned to him, heralding an invasion by the Eight Legs of Metebelis III to reclaim the crystal. With the aid of Sarah and a repentant Yates, the Doctor was encouraged by his childhood mentor to face the Eight Legs' Great One in the caves of Metebelis III to thwart their invasion, where he received a lethal dose of radiation as he escaped the cave's destruction in the TARDIS. The Doctor would be stuck wandering around the Time Vortex until the TARDIS "brought [him] home" to UNIT, where he managed to regenerate into a younger body. (TV: Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

Other realities[]

Alternate timelines[]

In an alternate timeline created by the Discordia, the Doctor had a passionate romantic relationship with River Song that began in his first incarnation, having married her by his fourth incarnation. Without the Brigadier's knowledge, the Doctor and River would meet up to practice one-legged Venusian aikido while blindfolded on a tightrope. (AUDIO: Someone I Once Knew [+]John Dorney, The Diary of River Song: Series Four (The Diary of River Song, Big Finish Productions, 2018).)

In an alternate timeline created by Mortimus using the Chronovore Artemis, (PROSE: No Future [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) the Third Doctor was killed by Morka during his confrontation with the Silurians, resulting in humanity being decimated as the Silurians attempted to return Earth to its original state. (PROSE: Blood Heat [+]Jim Mortimore, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).)

In one possible timeline envisioned by the Nexus, the Third Doctor decided to remain on Earth after his exile, settling down an old house with a garden. When the Ice Warriors invaded in 2010, the Doctor surrendered on Earth's behalf, with the Ice Warriors ruling the Earth Empire peacefully, assisting the humans and Silurians in combating the Rutans and the Daleks, but largely leaving them to their own devices, with Earth eventually becoming a nature reserve that shunned war. The Third Doctor was able to live for a thousand years on Earth without regenerating, though became wheelchair bound, and was aware that he was only a "copy" of the Doctor. (PROSE: So Vile a Sin [+]Ben Aaronovitch and Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).)

In an alternative timeline where his exile never ended, the Doctor remained in Britain for forty years, forming a working relationship with PM Melanie Bush for over twenty years. However, he eventually betrayed the United Kingdom when it was invaded by the Cybermen in 2010, as he felt that Britain's best efforts against the Cybermen were destined to be useless. The Cybermen partly converted the Doctor and restored his ability to travel in time. (PROSE: The Quantum Archangel [+]Craig Hinton, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2001).)

Averted timelines[]

Three in time distortion

The Doctor in the midst of a time distortion. (COMIC: Prologue: The Third Doctor [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

This section's awfully stubby.

Info from Prisoners of the Sun [+]Tim Robins, Decalog (Virgin Decalogs, 1994). needs to be added

When the Cybermen allied with Rassilon to take over history, (COMIC: Supremacy of the Cybermen [+]George Mann and Cavan Scott, Titan summer events (Titan Comics, 2016).) the Doctor encountered a time distortion during a battle with the Master that ended with the Master being cyber-converted. (COMIC: Prologue: The Third Doctor [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) This timeline was eventually unwritten by Rassilon and the Twelfth Doctor. (COMIC: Supremacy of the Cybermen [+]George Mann and Cavan Scott, Titan summer events (Titan Comics, 2016).)

Undone events[]

In a negated timeline, the TARDIS was attacked on 23 November 1963 by a conceptual bomb bought by the Decayed Master and began to be erased from time. The Third Doctor, along with his first and second incarnations, became trapped in another dimension, and tried to warn their other incarnations by reducing the explosion to a blinking light on the TARDIS with the coordinates of the explosion. However, when their four successors followed the warning, the Master took direct action in attacking them, until the Sixth Doctor managed to bring them together to formulate a plan. After the Fifth Doctor ensured that the TARDIS would not explode, the Doctors prepared to time ram the Master's TARDIS. However, rather than kill the Master, the First Doctor instead turned off the automatic distress actions, making it so none of the Doctors followed it into the explosion and undoing the events of the day. (AUDIO: The Light at the End [+]Nicholas Briggs, Big Finish Doctor Who Special Releases (Big Finish Productions, 2013).)

Other references[]

Travelling through the caves of the Death Zone to save Borusa from the Dark Tower, the War Doctor and Cinder found various cave paintings which the Doctor speculated were depictions of himself throughout his lives, some of which he failed to recognise. One of the paintings depicted a figure "with bouffant white hair and a cape being chased by a silver robot". (PROSE: Engines of War [+]George Mann, BBC New Series tie-in novels (BBC Books, 2014).)

Psychological profile[]

Personality[]

Unhappy Doctor

The Doctor expresses his outrage at orders taking priority over democracy. (TV: The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

A champion for peace and justice, (TV: Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) who "hardly ever" lied, (TV: The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974).) the Third Doctor valued his freedom, (TV: Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) believing "the collection of the simplest animal lifeforms [to be] a dubious enough pursuit in itself", but that "the collection of civilised [and] intelligent beings [was] a positive crime", (TV: Carnival of Monsters [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) sympathising with such caged creatures due to his experience as an exile on Earth. (AUDIO: Walls of Confinement [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) He was also more of a show-off than his predecessors, often putting himself at the centre of attention when his plans and contraptions worked accordingly. (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) Liz Shaw believed he only really required an assistant to "pass [him] [his] test tubes and to tell [him] how brilliant [he was]." (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).)

Having "an air of natural authority", (AUDIO: A True Gentleman [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) he was far more assertive than his preceding incarnations, (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) with less patience for protocols such as visitor's passes, (TV: The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) and strove to maintain his independence while working for UNIT, such as by ignoring the Brigadier's summonings. (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) He also disliked having to answer to the Time Lords, maintaining that he worked only for himself. (TV: Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) However, he could be more passive when it came to rescues, not questioning the falsehoods his allies would give when coming to his aid, (TV: The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) and, while he disliked having to work for them, he would use his association with UNIT as a means of getting his way. (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

Authoritative, yet rebellious, the Third Doctor always favoured peace and diplomacy above violence and aggression, though this lead him to clash with stalwart military-minded individuals who chose rules over morality, with figures such as the Brigadier often being a thorn in his side, especially when a particularly aggressive influential had a greater majority of imprudent people on their side. The Doctor held a strong disgust towards these people, who were any combination of stubborn, selfishly goal-driven or close-minded, and would be further outraged if they refused to listen to him, ignored his protests or went to absurd lengths just to dodge the risk of being proven wrong, especially when they acted antagonistic and undiplomatic. (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) If unsatisfied with someone's handling of a situation, however, the Doctor would step in forcefully and take charge, (TV: Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) but, if diplomacy outright failed, he reacted in a subdued manner, giving a scathing and virulent dressing down to the foolhardy individuals that destroyed a bid for peace and order. (TV: The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

Feeling akin to "a shipwrecked mariner" while stranded on Earth without a working TARDIS, (TV: Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) the Third Doctor spent a lot of his time trying to escape his exile, either by tricking others into helping him unlock his TARDIS' capabilities, (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) by trying to repair the circuits himself, (TV: The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Mutants [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) or by stealing parts from other TARDISes. (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) His desire to escape would cause him to become overconfident at the first sign of liberation, though he was often forced to humble himself once he realised he was still trapped. (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) After he threatened his eighth incarnation with the Master's TCE for a working TARDIS, the Doctor decided to remain in his exile of his own free will, (PROSE: The Eight Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).) eventually coming to see UNIT as a "new-found family", which he continued to visit after his exile was lifted. (PROSE: The Shadows of Avalon [+]Paul Cornell, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2000).)

Having a distain for bureaucracy, (TV: The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) he was rebellious against authorities that were openly hostile towards him. (TV: Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

While he was very hospitable with fellow intellects of his calibre, (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) the Doctor would get rude and dismissive with those he saw as beneath his intellectual prowess, particularly when they interfered in his work. (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) However, he could not bring himself to be dismissive of them in the face of their kindness, (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) and would not dismiss someone who others looked down upon for their poor intelligence. (TV: Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) At times, however, the Doctor could become argumentative and needed to be defused in order to establish fluid communication with people. (TV: The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).)

Never judging by appearance, (TV: Carnival of Monsters [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) the Doctor would eagerly extend the hand of friendship to any new species he encountered, (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) attempt to embrace the customs of the cultures he visited, (TV: The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974).) and would reserve his judgement on people until he had all the facts, (TV: Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) though his opinions on species as a whole could be clouded by past experiences with specific members. (TV: The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Death to the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

While he would chide others for having a "childish attitude", (TV: Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) the Doctor himself admitted a liking for "being childish", such as by enjoying the prospect of battling villains, (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) even prolonging a swordfight with the Master out of sheer enjoyment. (TV: The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) He also had no problem interrupting lecturers when he disagreed with what was being said. (TV: The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) By his own admittance, it was "impossible" for him to admit when he was wrong. (TV: Carnival of Monsters [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

The Third Doctor had a passion for science and gadgets that caused him to drown out other people when he was invested in his work. (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) He also loved his vintage car, Bessie, almost as much as he loved his TARDIS, fixing it up and giving encouraging pats and kisses, (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) and even preventing the Brigadier from shooting when Bessie was in the line of fire. (TV: The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).)

In moments of leisure, the Third Doctor could be found tinkering away at his car, (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) undergoing a scientific experiment, (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) visiting events to indulge his "scientific curiosity", (TV: The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) or building a new gadgetry contraption. (TV: The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

Though he desired a "quiet life", (TV: The Monster of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) the Doctor craved in seeing the wonders of the universe, (TV: Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) with his favourite planets being Metebelis III, (TV: Carnival of Monsters [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) and Florana. (TV: Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

He enjoyed gorgonzola cheese, wine, (TV: Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) and ice cream. (PROSE: Dr. Third [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) His liking of tea was so great that he allowed the UNIT tea lady unrestricted access to his private laboratory, (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) while also preferring lime to lemon in his drinks. (PROSE: Verdigris [+]Paul Magrs, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2000).)

Always trying to find the "good in everyone", the Third Doctor was an eternal optimist with a belief that life would always continue in some form, (TV: The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Mutants [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) often comforting people when all hope seemed lost to them, (TV: The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) believing that "nothing [was] impossible" as long as there was an answer to find. (TV: Carnival of Monsters [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) He considered the greatest virtues in humanity as being "kindness, compassion, humour, friendship, [and] generosity". (WC: U.N.I.T. On Call [+]Emily Cook and Jon Culshaw, Doctor Who: Lockdown! (2020).)

3 & Jo

Despite his victory, the Doctor voices his pity for Omega. (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).)

A strong believer in fairness, the Doctor was reluctant to release the Master back into the cosmos, (TV: The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) but argued against executing him at his trial due to his the belief that the Master was capable of redemption, (PROSE: Doctor Who and the Sea-Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, adapted from The Sea Devils (Malcolm Hulke), Target novelisations (Target Books, 1974).) and also bargained for him to be spared "an eternity of torment" from Kronos. (TV: The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) He was also saddened by the fate of Omega. (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) He strove to find a peaceful alternative to the more violent methods that others' held in resolving a crisis. (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).)

Not believing in the supernatural, the Doctor put his faith in science, believing that a scientific explanation could be found to anything unexplainable. (TV: The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) He saw "absolute power" as "evil", (TV: Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) and would turn away supreme powers when they were offered to him, (TV: The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) instead focusing on obtaining the "power of friendship", which he considered to be "real power". (COMIC: The Kingdom Builders [+]Alan Fennell, Polystyle comic stories (Polystyle, 1970-1971).) He thought that "superior intelligence and senseless cruelty just [did] not go together", (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) and once voiced the belief that "rules were made for breaking". (COMIC: The Forgotten [+]Tony Lee, IDW mini-series and one-shots (IDW Publishing, 2008-2009).)

While the place where he felt "most at home in the whole universe" was in his TARDIS, (AUDIO: Terror of the Master [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) the Doctor also saw "time and space" as being his "home", (TV: The Shrink [+]BBC One (1989).) but also held a similar sentiment for his UNIT laboratory. (TV: Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

Anything resembling nationalism provoked a self-righteous response from him. (TV: The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971). The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).).

While very little managed to scare him, (TV: Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) the Doctor had a fear of seeing a planet being overwhelmed by fire and destruction (TV: The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) after seeing the Inferno Earth being destroyed in volcanic ash. (TV: Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).)

While he was unafraid to use deadly force if it was "the only way" to end a fight, (COMIC: The Labyrinth [+]Dick O'Neill, TVA comic stories (Polystyle, 1973).) the Doctor was reluctant to destroy something if it had a trace of intelligence, likening it to murder, (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) though he would end a life if it "had to be done". (COMIC: The Hungry Planet [+]Stories in Countdown/TVA specials (Polystyle, 1974).) He felt nervous about his capabilities with a gun, (TV: The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) even when he proved effective with one. (TV: Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).)

While he had a dislike for machines, (TV: The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) he held a particular distain for computers, (TV: The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) believing them to be "stupid", (TV: Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) but noted that they could be useful tools. (TV: Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).)

The Third Doctor owned a country house thirty miles from Thisis, that he had bought with his UNIT wages. He decorated the dining room with French windows, robin's egg blue décor, a red wood dining table, and portraits of his past incarnations. There was also a room decorated in deep underwater blue, with a collection of blue Chinese ginger jars containing holograms of planets and creatures, including a Stranovitican. He had a laboratory in the house, which, though messier, was better equipped than the UNIT lab. He had the drive lined with marble statues of various mythical beasts, including a faun and a Minotaur. He also kept a pet ginger cat in the house, and had a huge yellow teapot in the kitchen. (PROSE: Verdigris [+]Paul Magrs, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2000).)

The Third Doctor had a noticeably antagonistic relationship with the Second Doctor, their personalities so different that they seemed incapable of working together amicably without the authoritative presence of their first incarnation. (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) He also disliked the Eighth Doctor, as he blamed him for the advice he gave the Second Doctor that resulted in his forced regeneration and exile. (PROSE: The Eight Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).)

The Fourth Doctor considered his immediate predecessor to be "an incorrigible show-off", (PROSE: Categorical Imperative [+]Simon Guerrier, Short Trips: Monsters (Short Trips short stories, 2004).) while the Fifth Doctor described the Third Doctor's behaviour as "arrogant" and "overbearing", although he admitted that he matured over time. (PROSE: Deep Blue [+]Mark Morris, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1999).)

While the Sixth Doctor told Peri Brown that his third incarnation was "more interested in axle grease and looking in the mirror" than in reading great literature, (AUDIO: Year of the Pig [+]Matthew Sweet, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2006).) he was willing to acknowledge the Third Doctor's superior skill with a sword, even if he dismissed him as having an "unusual dress sense". (PROSE: State of Change [+]Christopher Bulis, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) The Seventh Doctor also acknowledged that the Third Doctor's technical skill outstripped his other incarnations, (PROSE: Timewyrm: Genesys [+]John Peel, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1991).) and considered his third incarnation to be a "real dandy of a fellow". (COMIC: Under Pressure [+]Dan Abnett, Doctor Who Yearbook comic stories (Marvel Comics UK, 1991).)

While the Eighth Doctor looking down at his third incarnation, (COMIC: The Pictures of Josephine Day [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) he still acknowledged him as an "elegant dandy struggling bitterly against the chains of his exile but unable to resist defending the planet that had become his prison". (PROSE: The Eight Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).)

During to his exile on Earth, the Third Doctor was often frustrated about his mistreatment and became disrespectful from time-to-time, often bickering with Brigadier Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart due to not agreeing with his military methods. (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) However, the Doctor also held a great respect for the Brigadier, despite his "military mind", (TV: Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) and often found himself telling his assistants to show him due respect. (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).)

Despite his occasional rudeness, the Doctor grew very fond of his friends, often taking on the role of a teacher turning them into young scientists, (TV: The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) though he also enjoyed a professional relationship with his scientific equal, Liz Shaw. (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) At first, he was fearful of Jo Grant due to her bumbling nature, (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) but soon became fond enough of her to feel that meeting her made his exile worthwhile, (TV: Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) becoming upset when she decided to leave his company in pursuit of marrying Professor Clifford Jones. (TV: The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

Doctor eats Sandwich while Swordfighting

The Doctor has the audacity to eat the Master's lunch while holding him at sword point. (TV: The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).)

While the Third Doctor initially only saw the "UNIT era" Master as an "unimaginative plodder" that only caused trouble, (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) he eventually came to see him as the "personification of evil." However, he still visited him in prison due to their old friendship. When he and the Master broke out into a sword fight, the Doctor duelled him light-heartedly, being courteous to let the Master retrieve his weapon, and throw banter with him. He even stole a sandwich from a platter in the Master's cell and began eating it while he had his sword pinned on the Master's neck, for no reason other than a playful show of spite. (TV: The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) However, the Doctor distrusted him greatly, such as when he met the Tremas Master in the Death Zone, and, despite him carrying the Seal of the High Council as proof, the Doctor refused to believe the Master had been sent to aid him, instead assuming him to be behind the predicament and having stolen his credentials, and held no qualms about leaving him stranded in an attack. (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

Resentful at them for exiling him, the Doctor thought the Time Lords to be a "mean, despicable, [and] underhanded lot" (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) who "delighted in deviousness". (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

He was afraid of the Daleks, (TV: The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) viewing them as "the most evil [and] ruthless life form[s] in the cosmos", (TV: Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) and took "great satisfaction" in destroying them. (TV: Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) Because they were inherently violent and lacked the intelligence to reason with properly, the Doctor did not show restraint against Ogrons, immediately resorting to fatal action if they were given orders to kill. (TV: Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

Sarah Jane Smith once described the Third Doctor as being like a "favourite teacher". (PROSE: Still Need a Title! [+]James Goss and Steve Tribe, The Doctor: His Lives and Times (2013).) Ron Winters told Tony Clare, his new coworker at UNIT, that the Third Doctor was "super smart" and "[had] a thing for fancy equipment, fast cars, and smart gear." He felt the Doctor and Tony would like each other, specifically citing Tony's similar dress sense. (AUDIO: UNIT Dating [+]Roy Gill, Stranded 2 (The Eighth Doctor Adventures: Stranded, Big Finish Productions, 2021).)

Charles Lawrence called the Third Doctor "insolent, [and] impertinent", and criticised him for "showing no respect for [his] authority", (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) while King Dalios recognised him as a philosopher. (TV: The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) Florrie Cooper considered the Third Doctor to be "a proper toff". (AUDIO: The Three Companions [+]Marc Platt, The Companion Chronicles: The Specials (Big Finish Productions, 2009-2010).) When the Eighth Doctor had a tarot card reading, the Third Doctor was identified as "the Emperor". (PROSE: The City of the Dead [+]Lloyd Rose, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2001).)

While the "UNIT era" Master described the Third Doctor as a "bouffanted buffoon", (COMIC: Doorway to Hell [+]Mark Wright, DWM Comics (Panini Comics, 2017).) the Tremas Master remembered him as a "worthy foe" with "such cunning [and] such ingenuity" that was "all wasted through [his] stubborn streak of goodness". (GAME: Destiny of the Doctors [+]Hannah Redler, Gary Russell, Terrance Dicks and Andy Russell, BBC Multimedia (1997).)

Brigadier & Sarah Jane

The Doctor dies, with Sarah and the Brigadier by his side. (TV: Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

After confronting the Great One on Metebelis III to redeem himself for causing her incursion on Earth after stealing a Metebelis crystal, the Doctor returned to his UNIT lab on Earth, claiming to Sarah Jane that "the TARDIS [had] brought [him] home". Telling a saddened Sarah that facing his fears was more important than "just going on living", he wiped away her tears and tried to comfort her as he succumbed to the radiation poisoning of the crystal. (TV: Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

Habits and quirks[]

The Third Doctor developed a habit of uttering, "good grief", when he was annoyed, (TV: The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) surprised (TV: Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) or alarmed. (TV: The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) When tampering with machinery, he would find himself having to "reverse the polarity" to achieve his objectives. (TV: The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

The Doctor also made a habit of saying, "Yes, well...", to start his sentences, (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Mutants [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974)., The Monster of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) and would also say a variation of, "Now you listen to me", when trying to be persuasive, gain authority, obtain attention or issue instructions, (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974)., Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., Death to the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) or say, "Do as I say", when asserting his authority. (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

He frequently addressed his male contemporaries as, "my dear fellow", (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) or, "old chap", (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Mutants [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974)., The Monster of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) and would affectionately address his female associates as, "my dear". (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

He frequently said, "Yes, of course", when responding to someone, (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Mutants [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., Death to the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) or when reaching a conclusion. (TV: The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Mutants [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

When making a statement, the Doctor would say, "look", before elaborating on his statement. (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Mutants [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

When in moments of panicked outrage, he would often ask, "What/Who the blazes…". (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Mutants [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974)., The Monster of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) He also used words such as "pompous" and "nitwit" to describe people he thought were idiots. (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) When displeased, he would utter a blunt, "oh, no". (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

He also had a habit of saying "Jehoshaphat", (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).; COMIC: Time & Time Again [+]Paul Cornell, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1993).; PROSE: Interference - Book Two [+]Lawrence Miles, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1999)., Verdigris [+]Paul Magrs, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2000).; AUDIO: Pop-Up [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) or "Jumping Jehoshaphat", (COMIC: Sub Zero [+]Dennis Hooper, TVA comic stories (Polystyle, 1972).; PROSE: The Eight Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997)., The Wages of Sin [+]David A. McIntee, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1999).) and singing when tinkering on things or driving Bessie. (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Death to the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

When not in the pockets of his jackets, the Third Doctor would often stand with his hands on his hips, (TV: The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Mutants [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Death to the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) or keep them in the pockets of his trousers. (TV: Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974)., Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., Death to the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., The Monster of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) He typically stood with a single hand in his pocket, while his other hand dithered above his waist or by his side. (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Mutants [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., Carnival of Monsters [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Monster of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

He sometimes stood with his hands crossed behind his back, (TV: The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Mutants [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) or in front of him. (TV: The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974).) He would also have his arms folded on occasion. (TV: Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

Fidgety when in thought, the Third Doctor would rarely not be seen scratching at his mouth and chin, (TV: The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Shrink [+]BBC One (1989)., Dimensions in Time [+]John Nathan-Turner and David Roden, Doctor Who 30th anniversary special (BBC1, 1993).) rubbing his fingers with his thumb (TV: The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., The Monster of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983)., The Shrink [+]BBC One (1989)., Dimensions in Time [+]John Nathan-Turner and David Roden, Doctor Who 30th anniversary special (BBC1, 1993).) or singlehandedly rub at his neck. (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974)., Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., Death to the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., The Shrink [+]BBC One (1989)., Dimensions in Time [+]John Nathan-Turner and David Roden, Doctor Who 30th anniversary special (BBC1, 1993).) Instead, the Doctor would bop at his nose, (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) play with his lip (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) or tug at his ear. (TV: The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) He would also often fiddle with a pencil in his hand. (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).)

He would interlock his fingers together when sitting down. (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Mutants [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., Carnival of Monsters [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974)., Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974)., The Shrink [+]BBC One (1989).)

He would often bring up his association with historical figures and events, causing him to be labelled a "name dropper". (TV: The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Monster of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

The Doctor made use of an eye loupe magnifying glass for examining materials. (TV: Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) He also carried a cane on his person, (COMIC: The Arkwood Experiments [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (Polystyle, 1970).) which he had modified with gadgets to fulfill his requirements. (COMIC: Assassin from Space [+]TV Comic Holiday Special stories (Polystyle, 1970).)

When he needed to respond to something, he would utter, "I see".[source needed] When his friends guessed correctly, he would call them the "top of the class".[source needed] When annoyed, he would say, "for heaven's sake",[source needed] and was known to indulge in epizeuxes.[source needed]

Skills[]

Boxing

The Doctor boxes with John Andrews. (TV: Carnival of Monsters [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

Possessing strength that rivaled a healthy young man (COMIC: The Magician [+]TVC comic stories (Polystyle, 1974).) and a reaction time "ten times faster" than a human's, (TV: The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) the Third Doctor was a man of action, joining the fray whenever needed with his mastery of Venusian aikido, (TV: Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) boxing, (TV: Carnival of Monsters [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) Saturnian kung-fu, (PROSE: The Devil Goblins from Neptune [+]Martin Day and Keith Topping, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).) Martian karate, (PROSE: Inferno [+]Terrance Dicks, adapted from Inferno (Don Houghton), Target novelisations (Target Books, 1984).) and Mercurian kung fu. (COMIC: The Heralds of Destruction [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) The Third Doctor's skill at combat was so exceptional that the Sixth Doctor considered him to be the best hand-to-hand combatant of his previous five incarnations. (PROSE: State of Change [+]Christopher Bulis, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).)

Doctor v Robbie

The Doctor aims at Robbie from afar. (COMIC: Doctor Who and the Robot [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (Polystyle, 1970).)

The Doctor was a good marksman, (TV: Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974).) being able to hit a precise spot on a faraway robot from a moving helicopter. (COMIC: Doctor Who and the Robot [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (Polystyle, 1970).) He was also a skilled swordsman, (TV: The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Monster of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) and could score a perfect golf game while blindfolded. (TV: The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).)

Doctor vs BOSS brainwashing

BOSS unsuccessfully uses its conditioning on the Doctor. (TV: The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

The Doctor was able to break states of hypnosis and mind control caused by others, (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974).) and could also resist forms of hypnosis which would defeat weaker-minded individuals, (TV: The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974).) such as being able to withstand numerous mind probes. (TV: Frontier in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) He could also perform standard hypnotism. (TV: The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

Having an enjoyment for tinkering with gadgets, (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) though unsatisfied with the technology at his disposal during his exile, (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) the Doctor was able to use what he had to quickly construct equipment needed to defeat his adversaries. (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) He was also able to repair and improve the relay circuit for the Uxarieus colony, (TV: Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) and construct his own formula for a smoke bomb in the 13th century. (TV: The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974).)

With the aid of Liz Shaw, the Doctor was able to manufacture a counteragent to the Silurian virus. (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).)

His eyesight was strong enough for him to see hairs a millimetre in length unaided. (AUDIO: The Paradise of Death [+]Barry Letts, BBC Audio Dramas (BBC Radio 5, 1993).)

Having "an excellent ear for music", the Doctor could use his recorder to control animals by playing the correct musical notes. (COMIC: Castaway [+]TV Comic special comic stories (Polystyle, 1970).) He was also an acclaimed singer, being able to tame an Aggedor with a Venusian lullaby. (TV: The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).)

An enthusiast for transportation, the Third Doctor was able to easily commandeer cars, (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) space capsules, (COMIC: Doctor Who and the Rocks from Venus [+]Alan Fennell, TVC comic stories (Polystyle, 1970).) motorcycles (TV: The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) steam engines, (COMIC: Backtime [+]Dick O'Neill, TVA comic stories (Polystyle, 1971).) quadbikes, (TV: Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) jet skis, (TV: The Sea Devils [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) gyrocopters, and hovercrafts. (TV: Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) He also made for an experienced astronaut, (TV: The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) and could ride a horse. (COMIC: Backtime [+]Dick O'Neill, TVA comic stories (Polystyle, 1971).) He once piloted an RAF Superhawk from England to Kebiria, (PROSE: Dancing the Code [+]Paul Leonard, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) and once engaged in aerobatics to evade a swarm of giant wasps. (COMIC: Insect [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (Polystyle, 1970).)

The Third Doctor's knowledge of the TARDIS greatly increased from his previous incarnations, chiefly due to him repeatedly taking it completely apart and reassembling it to try and make it work during his exile. (TV: The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) Once the Time Lords returned the knowledge of how to operate it, (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) the Doctor was more adept at controlling his destinations than before, denying any mistake on his part if he strayed, and being elevated when he learnt he had been interfered with, rather than his navigation being faulty. (TV: Carnival of Monsters [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Death to the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

According to River Song, he was as an "amazing gourmand", (GAME: The Eternity Clock [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) and once prepared a roast dinner for Jo, Iris Wildthyme and Tom. (PROSE: Verdigris [+]Paul Magrs, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2000).)

The Third Doctor could speak Hokkien, Cantonese, (TV: The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) Spanish, (TV: The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) and Tibetan. (TV: Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) He also knew Morse code, (TV: The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) could speak in sign language, (COMIC: Nova [+]Gerry Haylock, TVC comic stories (Polystyle, 1973).) and was able to control his pheromones to communicate with the Builders. (PROSE: Primitives [+]John Seavey, Short Trips: Life Science (Short Trips short stories, 2004).) He could also read Persian, (COMIC: The Magician [+]TVC comic stories (Polystyle, 1974).) and Old High Gallifreyan. (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

The Third Doctor was a skilled diplomat, (TV: The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) and linguist, (TV: The Mind of Evil [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) as well as having a knack for disguises, even altering his voice for his characters. (TV: The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974).) He was a fast drawer, able to draw a somewhat decent picture of a Silurian in seconds, (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) and could also sculpt with a hammer and chisel. (PROSE: Sedna [+]Andrew Frankham, Short Trips: The Solar System (Short Trips short stories, 2005).)

Being able to utilise transmigration, (TV: The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) the Doctor could perform magic tricks, (TV: Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., The Monster of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) such as levitation, (COMIC: Levitation [+]Roger Noel Cook, TV Comic special comic stories (Polystyle, 1970).) and control anti-gravity through concentration. (COMIC: Who is the Stranger [+]Dennis Hooper, TVA comic stories (Polystyle, 1973).) He also learnt escapology from Harry Houdini. (TV: Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

He had a photographic memory. (COMIC: Steelfist [+]Dennis Hooper, TVA comic stories (Polystyle, 1972).)

When his body underwent too much strain, or he was exceptionally injured, the Doctor could force himself into a coma to allow himself to heal. (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Monster of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

Appearance[]

Number 5 reception centre

The Doctor sarcastically poses for his mug shot. (TV: Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

The Third Doctor had a "craggy" face that made him look like a grandfather, (AUDIO: A True Gentleman [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) with a shock of white hair, a pronounced chin, a pointy nose and blue eyes (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) that "sparkled with intelligence". (AUDIO: A True Gentleman [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) By his own account, he had "slim, artistic hands". (PROSE: Independence Day [+]Peter Darvill-Evans, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2000).) The Doctor sported a tattoo of a snake coiled into the shape of a question mark on his right forearm, (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) which was a mark made by the Time Lords to signify that he was in exile. (PROSE: Christmas on a Rational Planet [+]Lawrence Miles, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).)

The Doctor disliked his face at first, but quickly thought himself as looking "quite distinctive". (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).)

ThirdDoctor-Tattoo-CloseUp

The Doctor's convict tattoo. (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).)

Jo once described the Doctor as a "whirlwind in a frilly shirt," (AUDIO: The Doll of Death [+]Marc Platt, The Companion Chronicles (Big Finish Productions, 2008).) while Irongron described him as a "long-shanked rascal, with a mighty nose." (TV: The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974).) Cindy Wu commented that he had a "nice face" that looked "sort of old, but young at the same time." Though he appeared older than the Tenth Doctor, Cindy found that she could tell the true difference in their age by looking into their eyes. (COMIC: The Lost Dimension [+]George Mann, et al., Titan summer events (Titan Comics, 2017).) Arthur Ollis described the Third Doctor as being "tall, [in] fancy get up, [with] white hair." (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).)

The Fifth Doctor described his third incarnation as an "aristocrat", (PROSE: Five Card Draw [+]Todd Green, Short Trips: Zodiac (Short Trips, 2002).) while the Sixth Doctor called him the "ruffle-shirted toff with the big nose", (PROSE: The Shadow in the Glass [+]Justin Richards and Stephen Cole, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2001).) and "a tall chap with white hair and rather flamboyant clothes". (AUDIO: Urgent Calls [+]Eddie Robson, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2007).) The Seventh Doctor described him as "tall [and] white-haired". (PROSE: First Frontier [+]David A. McIntee, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).)

When Affinity took on the Third Doctor's appearance, the Twelfth Doctor noted that his third incarnation had "[a] rather impressive height, [with] an impressive bouffant of white hair." The manifestation appeared in a "ruffled shirt, purple velvet smoking jacket, and scarlet-lined cape." (PROSE: Silhouette [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

Hair and grooming[]

Shortly after his regeneration, the Third Doctor possessed a flat, inconspicuous short-cut hairstyle, (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) that gradually evolved into a voluminous and exuberant bouffant. (TV: Inferno [+]Don Houghton, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970)., Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971)., Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Time Monster [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974)., Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).)

When Ace encountered the Third Doctor in the Seventh Doctor's mind, she noticed that he had "a shock of white hair." (PROSE: Timewyrm: Revelation [+]Paul Cornell, adapted from Total Eclipse, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1991).) River Song believed that the Third Doctor's hair made him look "like a lion", (GAME: The Eternity Clock [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) while Winstanley mistook it for a wig. (TV: The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).)

Clothing[]

Main attires[]

Following his regeneration, the Doctor kept wearing a TARDIS homing watch on his left wrist and a flat metal chain bracelet on his right. After he stole clothes from Ashbridge Cottage Hospital, his outfit consisted of a white frilled shirt, a navy blue velvet suit, black trousers with suspenders, black dress shoes, a black cravat and Dr. Beavis' black Inverness cape with red innings and his black fedora hat. (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) The Doctor had chosen these clothes to help him cultivate his chosen persona, but he eventually decided that the Fedora hat had been a mistake. (PROSE: Prisoners of the Sun [+]Tim Robins, Decalog (Virgin Decalogs, 1994).) He returned them after being recruited by UNIT, since one of his requests for his employment was identical clothing to call his own. (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) His choice of clothes would change with a variety of colours and designs that were kept in a wardrobe by the TARDIS control console. (TV: Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

The Third Doctor wore a variety of smoking jackets and blazers, with colours and designs coming in navy blue with a rolled collar, (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) maroon with a rolled collar, (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) rust orange with a notched collar, (TV: The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) olive green with a notched collar, (TV: Carnival of Monsters [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) plum purple with a notched collar, (TV: Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) petrol blue with scarlet piping on the notched lapel, (TV: The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) aquamarine with a notched collar, (TV: Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) emerald green with a notched collar, (TV: The Monster of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) charcoal with a notched collar, (TV: Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) and burgundy with a rolled collar. (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

His shirts were coloured in white, (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) magenta, (TV: Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) lime green, (TV: The Monster of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) sky blue, (TV: Planet of the Spiders [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) and purple. (PROSE: The Spear of Destiny [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

He wore a series of Inverness capes that could function as "para-cloaks" if needed, (COMIC: The Hungry Planet [+]Stories in Countdown/TVA specials (Polystyle, 1974).) which were coloured in red silk-lined black, (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) purple silk-lined black, (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) red and green tartan, (TV: The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) blue silk-lined black, (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) burnt orange silk-lined brown, (TV: Carnival of Monsters [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) grey checked with mid-blue lining, (TV: Invasion of the Dinosaurs [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) and brown tartan. (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

On his collars, he wore a black cravat, (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) a midnight blue cravat, (TV: The Ambassadors of Death [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) a white jabot, (TV: Terror of the Autons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) a patterned jabot, (TV: The Dæmons [+]Guy Leopold, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).) a vermillion cravat, (TV: The Mutants [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) a black bow tie, (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) a bottle green bow tie, (TV: Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) a wine red bow tie, (TV: The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) a cyan bow tie, (TV: The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974).) an ivory bow tie (COMIC: The Lost Dimension [+]George Mann, et al., Titan summer events (Titan Comics, 2017).) or he would go with an unbuttoned collar instead. (TV: Day of the Daleks [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) Sometimes, he would don a magnifying glass pendant. (TV: The Time Warrior [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1973-1974).)

He sometimes wore either a grey, zigzagged patterned waistcoat, (TV: The Curse of Peladon [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 9 (BBC1, 1972).) or a 6-buttoned crimson velvet collared vest with a golden fob watch. (TV: The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973)., Death to the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 11 (BBC1, 1974).) He also had a pair of knee-high wellington boots. (TV: Carnival of Monsters [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

The Third Doctor was also keen on wearing decorative rings, having a coin mounted on a silvery circlet on his left little finger, (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) and a plain one on his right little finger at some point. (TV: The Green Death [+]Robert Sloman, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).) He also sometimes wore riding gloves while driving Bessie (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970).) or outdoors in general. (TV: The Claws of Axos [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).)

Because of his more frilled and flamboyant fashion, his first incarnation sneeringly called him a "dandy," (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) while his second incarnation labelled him "fancy pants". (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) Upon first seeing him, Morgan thought that the Doctor was wearing "fancy dress". (TV: Colony in Space [+]Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 8 (BBC1, 1971).)

Behind the scenes[]

Information from invalid sources[]

Devious

Pertwee in the Devious regeneration scene

In 1995, Pertwee reprised his role as the Doctor for the fan film Devious, filming a regeneration scene to transition between the film's "Second-and-a-Half-Doctor" and the Third Doctor. Audio from Pertwee's scene was later used for Zagreus [+]Alan Barnes and Gary Russell, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2003)., and parts of the film (including the regeneration scene) were included in the form of a trailer of sorts on the DVD release of The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).. However, this wiki deems Devious to be invalid, partially under the factor of it being fan-made, and additionally for being unreleased in full.

Casting[]

  • Ron Moody was approached by the producers after his success in Oliver Twist, but he turned down the role. He stated in interviews that turning down the role of the Third Doctor was the worst thing he ever did professionally.[source needed]

Costume influences[]

  • The Third Doctor's wardrobe was more colourful and ornate than any of those of his previous incarnations partially because, in real life, the BBC was experimenting with various combinations of colours during Jon Pertwee's tenure in the role to determine which ones would photograph best.[source needed]
  • The Third Doctor's increasingly-bouffant hairstyle originated from Katy Manning teasing Pertwee about a tiny bald spot on the back of his head, and then recommending he make his hair "bigger" to cover the bald spot when he became self-conscious about it. (DCOM: Planet of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1973).)

Reprising the role[]

  • In early 1996, Pertwee reprised the role again for a Vodafone advertisement, in which an unnamed government agent (played by Kyle MacLachlan) travels to Liverpool to prevent the construction of a dangerous time machine. When this device turns out to be an elaborate karaoke machine, the agent leaves – not realising that an actual alien time traveller, the Doctor, is coincidentally working in a garage two doors down. Pertwee died the following May.

Other matters[]

Third Doctor Illustration in DWM 122

Illustration of the Third Doctor in Doctor Who Magazine 122, by Philip Cottrell.

  • The Third Doctor is unique in having first appeared in the title sequence before appearing in any actual scenes on the show.
  • The tattoo visible on the Doctor's arm during Spearhead from Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 7 (BBC1, 1970). was Pertwee's own, left over from his days in the navy. It can be seen more clearly in the 1955 film, A Yank in Ermine, and its promotional images.[1]

A green and scarlet cobra was squirming itself into a question mark on my forearm. In the middle was a small letter C, which I could only assume stood for Carlotta. On the other hand perhaps the choice of subject had been taken from a child's spelling book and the C stood for cobra.Moon Boots and Dinner Suits, by Jon Pertwee

External links[]

Footnotes[]

  1. Moon Boots and Dinner Suits, an autobiography by Jon Pertwee
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