Tardis

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The Prints of Denmark was the third story in The Second Doctor: Volume Three, produced by Big Finish Productions. It was written by Paul Morris and featured Wendy Padbury as Zoe Heriot and Rufus Hound as The Monk

Publisher's summary[]

The man Zoe travels through time and space with is a comical little man, eager to make a difference. To make things better. He's a man who loves the Earth, its history, its potential, and is happy to help things along when he can. And now Zoe is the only one standing between him and changing Earth unrecognisably: for The Monk, the play's the thing...

Plot[]

to be added

Cast[]

References[]

Popular culture[]

  • Zoe knows who the Spice Girls are.
  • Kanye West plays in an adaptation of Hamlet
  • The Monk says Zoe could watch Hamlet on Netflix
  • The Monk says Time is not a Disney character

Notes[]

  • Ian Atkins was responsible for the initial phase of production, including the script brief, while Dominic G. Martin was responsible for the recording phase of production. (BFX: The Prints of Denmark)
  • The "germ" for this story came from a single line in The Time Meddler. (VOR 157)
  • This story plays on missing episodes, which Paul Morris claims was to "run through the entire boxset". (VOR 157) References to this include violent material of the Hamlet television broadcast being cut (censor clips), and Tele-snaps and off-air recordings of the broadcast being taken.
  • This is a rare instance for Big Finish where an actor plays a fictional version of themselves. In this case, other than playing the Monk and various other uncredited roles, Rufus Hound briefly plays himself in a segment focused on the Hamlet television broadcast.

Continuity[]

External links[]

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