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The Janus Conjunction was the sixteenth novel in the BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures series. It was written by Trevor Baxendale, released 5 October 1998 and featured the Eighth Doctor and Sam Jones.

It is the first BBC Books novel to feature the death of a companion, although the death is retroactively prevented through the use of a temporal orbit by the Doctor.

Publisher's summary[]

The planets Janus Prime and Menda are diametrically opposed in orbit around a vast Red Giant star. But while Menda is rich and fertile in the light of the sun, Janus Prime endures everlasting night, its moon causing a permanent solar eclipse.

When the Doctor and Sam arrive on Janus Prime, they find themselves in the middle of a war between rival humans colonising the area. The planet is littered with ancient ruins, and the Mendans are using a mysterious hyperspatial link left behind by the planet's former inhabitants. But what is its true purpose?

The Doctor and Sam must piece together a centuries-old puzzle. How can Janus Prime's moon weigh billions of tons more than it should? Why is the planet riddled with deadly radiation? As the violence escalates around them, will the time travellers survive to discover the answers?

Plot[]

to be added

Characters[]

  • Eighth Doctor
  • Sam Jones
  • Julya
  • Vigo
  • Lunder
  • Lunder's mother
  • Kleiner
  • Captain Gustav Zemler
  • Sergeant Jon Moslei
  • Varko
  • Streenus
  • Pietr
  • Kejke
  • Nwakanma
  • Anni Zeck
  • Jonah Gilly
  • Vikto
  • Unrin
  • Blakt
  • Rosnan
  • Maknall
  • Big Henrietta
  • Tisnel
  • Hooknose
  • Anson

References[]

The Doctor[]

  • The Doctor and Sam pull the "Number Eleven" manoeuvre upon seeing a spidroids outside the TARDIS.
  • The Doctor mentions being shot in San Francisco.
  • The Doctor trained to fly a shuttle on the Mars-Venus run in 2511.
  • The Doctor says he isn't afraid of spiders.
  • The Doctor talks to Lunder about UNIT.

Conflicts[]

  • Kleiner saw military combat in Alphan Kundekka conflict of 2198.

Fashion and clothing[]

  • The Doctor gives Sam a white panama hat that can be rolled up.

Foods and beverages[]

Individuals[]

  • Sam gets extreme radiation poisoning and then dies of Janusian radiation poisoning at 019.04 Mendan time. However she is (retroactively) saved via a temporal orbit and the Doctor developing a cure.
  • Gustav Zemler has already gone quite mad from radiation poisoning. Because of said radiation poisoning, he can access the Janusians' alpha waves and communicate (after a fashion) with them.
  • Moslei was born in 2162.

Locations[]

  • The Doctor and Sam meant to be heading for Earth, Egypt, 1871 for the inaugural performance at Cairo Opera House.
  • Sam has been to a theme park in the Cronns system.

Planets[]

Species[]

Technology[]

  • The Link is thought to be a matter transmitter, but isn't. It's actually used to put Janus Prime's moons into conjunction and destroy the solar system.
  • The Link affects space by warping in hyperspace.
  • The Doctor has in his pockets a sub-etheric beam locator.
  • Humans travelled out into the galaxies using star charts and technology left behind by the Daleks after the 22nd century Dalek invasion.
  • The Doctor states that "matter transmitters were pretty crude affairs in the early twenty-third century."

Theories and concepts[]

  • Korman radiation scale is a measurement scale used aboard the TARDIS.
  • Alpha waves are somewhere close to telepathy.
  • The Doctor "parks" the TARDIS in a temporal orbit to spend time working on a cure for the Janusian radiation sickness.

Weapons[]

  • Sam is shot at; her shoulder gets glanced by a laser rifle and gets infected.

Notes[]

  • The "Korman radiation scale" is most likely named after Kate Orman.

Continuity[]

External links[]

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