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Should this article mention the questionable canonicity of Human Nature? 90.198.228.244 23:59, 27 March 2008 (UTC)

No why? Both are canon. Just because the Doctor has had two separate though similar experiences does not diminish the validity of them, there are numerous explanations for this out in fandom. --Tangerineduel 11:28, 28 March 2008 (UTC)

Neutrality and toneEdit

Reading through this article I'm not sure where the tone of this article is sitting or its neutrality, or in fact its audience.

I know it would be relatively tricky to write an article to keep all fans happy, but this is an encyclopaedia and it's about presenting information; neutrally. Several statements throughout the article seem to be suggesting that certain elements are more or less canon or are "generally" considered canon (or not).

The use of a collective "fans" also needs to be addressed as it assumes that fans have a collective ideas about this sort of thing, but the opening sentence states that it "differs from fan to fan", which makes the collective term of 'fans' throughout the article some what moot. --Tangerineduel 16:43, October 30, 2009 (UTC)

Or is there an actual policy? Edit

Over at Doctor Who Answers, someone has posted the claim (of course without giving a source) that all claims that there is no official policy are lies. Here's the link to the discussion: [1] As someone (OK, me) responded, the person didn't provide a source so why should we believe him and not, well, Paul Cornell (and I've heard others make the statement - hell, I think RTD referenced it once). That said, given Doctor Who's growth as a product of the BBC in the last few years, is it possible that there is now a policy in place as to what is canon? I personally can't see it. I do know the BBC has long held that viewers shouldn't need to have to go elsewhere to follow the storyline of Doctor Who - so the Adventure Games, for example, while they may be extensions to the Season 5 and 6 storylines aren't required for understanding the TV episodes. Likewise you shouldn't have to listen to any Big Finish audios or read any novels to get what's going on. But that's not the same as "decanonizing" things; it just forbids multi-platform crossovers, is all. The only case of "fanon decanonizing" I'm aware of is Scream of the Shalka and Dimensions in Time; even then, as far as I know the BBC hasn't done this. Anyway, I'm just leaving this here for others to hash out. Me, until DWM or some trusted source like that (or, OK, someone here who has done the research) says otherwise, the non-policy regarding canon is still in place. 70.72.223.215talk to me 00:32, May 24, 2012 (UTC)

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