FANDOM


(yeah, need to sort this out)
(better reformat)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
{{inuse}}{{real world}}
 
{{inuse}}{{real world}}
 
:''"Special effects" and "SFX" redirect here. You may be looking for [[Special Effects (Doctor Who Confidential episode)|the ''Doctor Who Confidential'' episode]] or the [[SFX (magazine)|magazine]] of the same name.
 
:''"Special effects" and "SFX" redirect here. You may be looking for [[Special Effects (Doctor Who Confidential episode)|the ''Doctor Who Confidential'' episode]] or the [[SFX (magazine)|magazine]] of the same name.
'''Special effects''' often abbreviated '''SFX''' — are those elements of a shot which cannot be achieved exclusively by [[practical effect|practical means]] during [[principal photography]]. They can be accomplished with the varying techniques of [[CGI]], model work and a variety of other techniques. Even practical effects can be used as an element in a "special effects shot", such as when specially filmed flame or lava effects are later composited into a shot.
+
'''Special effects''' often abbreviated '''SFX''' — are, in terms of the [[BBC Wales]] production of ''[[Doctor Who]]'', [[practical effect]]s. They involve the efforts of technicians dedicated to achieving an effect on camera, during [[principal photography]]. At least in terms of [[21st century]] ''Doctor Who'', they should not be confused with [[visual effects]], which are achieved in [[post-production]].
   
For the most part, the starting "canvass" for special effects is a blue or green screen placed behind actors during principal photography. This solid patch of color an then be removed and replaced with another image. During much of the original series, this was achieved through a process known as [[CSO|color separation overlay]], whereby a blue screen would be fed images during the live recording of the shot. Since the [[Doctor Who (1996)|TV movie]], most of the special effects seen on ''Doctor Who'' have been achieved through the use of CGI, a more nuanced approach to special effects which allow elements rendered on a computer to be composited into a shot captured during principal photography. As contrasted with CSO work, CGI work is completed exclusively in [[post-production]]. For this reason, many no longer consider CSO to be a true special effect.
+
The public face of special effects, on programmes like ''[[Doctor Who Confidential]]'', ''[[Totally Doctor Who]]'', ''[[Inside the World of Doctor Who]]'' and ''[[Torchwood Declassified]]'', has often been [[Danny Hargreaves]].
  +
==Historical usage==
  +
Historically, there was little distinction between the terms "[[visual effect]]" and "special effect". Thus, people credited under the title "Visual Effects" during most of the [[1963]] run of ''[[Doctor Who]]'' were often dealing with effects generated in-camera on the day of recording. Indeed, many major films, such as those in the original ''[[Star Wars]]'' trilogy, made no real distinction between "special" and "visual" effects, leading to a general public belief, reinforced by behind-the-scenes documentaries (and even magazine titles like ''[[SFX (magazine)|SFX]]''), that special effects has to do with CGI, green screen, and general post-production wizardry.
   
The term describes both the title the work and the work itself. Thus [[The Mill]] provide special effects and are given the title of '''"Special Effects"''' in the credits of the 2005 series of ''[[Doctor Who]]''.
+
This led to the confusing situation of "visual effects" meaning two rather different things in the history of ''Doctor Who''. In the original run, it definitely meant "special effects" until around the time of ''[[Time and the Rani]]''. At that point, it became possible to have rudimentary visual effects achieved in post-production. ([[DOC]]: ''[[7D FX]]'') Even so, people credited under "Visual Effects" were still doing what would be called practical "special effects", in addition to what the [[BBC Wales]] production would call "visual effects", until ''[[Survival]]''.
 
==Historical usage==
 
Historically, there was no distinction between the terms "[[visual effects]]" and "special effects". Thus, people credited under the title "Visual Effects" during most of the [[1963]] run of ''[[Doctor Who]]'' were often dealing with effects generated in-camera on the day of recording. In the [[BBC Wales]] version this
 
   
 
{{wikipediainfo}}
 
{{wikipediainfo}}
 
 
{{real world stub}}
 
{{real world stub}}
 
[[Category:Production team titles]]
 
[[Category:Production team titles]]

Revision as of 01:24, January 18, 2011

Stand well clear, Jo!

This article is currently undergoing significant editing. Editors should not use this tag for more than 72 hours. Please do not edit it until you no longer see this message, or until 72 hours have passed from the time this message appeared in the edit history.

RealWorld
"Special effects" and "SFX" redirect here. You may be looking for the Doctor Who Confidential episode or the magazine of the same name.

Special effects often abbreviated SFX — are, in terms of the BBC Wales production of Doctor Who, practical effects. They involve the efforts of technicians dedicated to achieving an effect on camera, during principal photography. At least in terms of 21st century Doctor Who, they should not be confused with visual effects, which are achieved in post-production.

The public face of special effects, on programmes like Doctor Who Confidential, Totally Doctor Who, Inside the World of Doctor Who and Torchwood Declassified, has often been Danny Hargreaves.

Historical usage

Historically, there was little distinction between the terms "visual effect" and "special effect". Thus, people credited under the title "Visual Effects" during most of the 1963 run of Doctor Who were often dealing with effects generated in-camera on the day of recording. Indeed, many major films, such as those in the original Star Wars trilogy, made no real distinction between "special" and "visual" effects, leading to a general public belief, reinforced by behind-the-scenes documentaries (and even magazine titles like SFX), that special effects has to do with CGI, green screen, and general post-production wizardry.

This led to the confusing situation of "visual effects" meaning two rather different things in the history of Doctor Who. In the original run, it definitely meant "special effects" until around the time of Time and the Rani. At that point, it became possible to have rudimentary visual effects achieved in post-production. (DOC: 7D FX) Even so, people credited under "Visual Effects" were still doing what would be called practical "special effects", in addition to what the BBC Wales production would call "visual effects", until Survival.

WikipediaInfo
Real worldStub
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.