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Originally a man with the demeanour of an eccentric, light-hearted buffoon who delighted in humorous reverie, the Seventh Doctor darkened into a Machiavellian manipulator to combat Fenric's return, becoming a sombre genius of frightful calibre who could tactfully use his mind to manipulate almost any situation into reaching his favoured outcome for the "greater good", actively seeking out evil to vanquish instead of traveling aimlessly.

However, he could also show profound warmth and affection to his companions, and built a strong bond with many of them, almost becoming a substitute parent-like figure in his handling of them, even if he had to hurt some of his closest friends by toying with their minds as part of his schemes.

Biography[]

Main article: Seventh Doctor/Biography

In his early days, the Doctor was little more than a carefree traveller seeing the universe with Mel Bush after escaping the scheme of the First Rani on Lakertya, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) with the pair arriving at the likes of Paradise Towers and Shangri-La Wales as the Doctor began to change from a clown to a schemer, (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Delta and the Bannermen [+]Malcolm Kohll, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) until they came to Iceworld and met Ace, a troubled teenager from 1980s Earth (TV: Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) who the Doctor recognised as a Wolf of Fenric, and the Doctor, realising he could no longer avoid his rematch with Fenric, nudged Mel into leaving (PROSE: Head Games [+]Steve Lyons, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) with Sabalom Glitz while he took Ace on as a companion. (TV: Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).)

Treating her both as his protégé and a pawn in Fenric's game, (TV: The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) the Doctor did his best to heal Ace's psychological wounds by helping her come to terms with her past misdeeds and fears, aiding her in maturing and supporting her in moments of difficulty, (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., Silver Nemesis [+]Kevin Clarke, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1 and TVNZ, 1988)., The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989)., Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) while he descended more into a dark deceiver, even tricking Davros into destroying Skaro with the Hand of Omega to end the Imperial-Renegade Dalek Civil War, (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).) killing Helen A's pet Stigorax to topple her regime on Terra Alpha (TV: The Happiness Patrol [+]Graeme Curry, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).) and destroying a Cyber-Fleet with Nemesis. (TV: Silver Nemesis [+]Kevin Clarke, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1 and TVNZ, 1988).)

After they freed the Psychic Circus from the Gods of Ragnarok with the Vulpanan werewolf Mags, (TV: The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989).) the Doctor left Ace in the Cretaceous period (COMIC: Train-Flight [+]Andrew Donkin and Graham S. Brand, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1990).) and reunited with Frobisher for some brief adventures until they parted ways again. (COMIC: A Cold Day in Hell! [+]Simon Furman, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1987-1988).) As he travelled alone, the Doctor ran into the likes of Death's Head (COMIC: The Crossroads of Time [+]Simon Furman, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1988).) and Abslom Daak, (COMIC: Nemesis of the Daleks [+]<span class="NWLH" title="Richard Starkings (as Richard Alan)
John Tomlinson (as Steve Alan)">Richard Starkings
, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1989).) until he retrieved Ace. (PROSE: Living in the Past [+]Andy Lane, DWM short stories (1990).) In their continued adventures, they assisted UNIT in stopping Morgaine from obtaining Excalibur (TV: Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) and prevented Josiah Samuel Smith's plan to assassinate Queen Victoria, (TV: Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) before they had their fated showdown with Fenric at 1943 Maiden's Point, where they emerged victorious. (TV: The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) The Doctor then brought Ace back to her home of Perivale in time to face the Tremas Master on the Cheetah Planet. After the Master was left on the Cheetah Planet as it exploded, accounts differ on the Doctor and Ace's exploits after they departed Perivale with "work to do". (TV: Survival [+]Rona Munro, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).)

According to one account, the Doctor and Ace quickly found themselves caught in the schemes of the Mandragora Helix (COMIC: The Mark of Mandragora [+]Dan Abnett, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1990-1991).) and attended a party on Maruthea. (COMIC: Party Animals [+]Gary Russell, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1991).) In conjunction with another account, the Doctor began to embrace his role as Time's Champion, in which he worked in the service of the Eternal known as Time, (PROSE: Love and War [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992).) by the time he faced the Timewyrm. (PROSE: Timewyrm: Revelation [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) Although he did many good deeds while under the title of Time's Champion, his manipulative ways and amoral decisions cost him dearly, with Ace leaving him as he was joined by Bernice Summerfield on Heaven. (PROSE: Love and War [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992).) Ace would eventually return, (PROSE: Deceit [+]Peter Darvill-Evans, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) though the Doctor was unable to regain her trust until they defeated Mortimus and his plot to corrupt the Doctor's timeline. (PROSE: No Future [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) Ace would eventually leave to become "Time's Vigilante" (PROSE: Set Piece [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) and Bernice would depart to marry Jason Kane, (PROSE: Happy Endings [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) leaving the Doctor to travel with Adjudicators Roz Forrester and Chris Cwej (PROSE: GodEngine [+]Craig Hinton, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) until Roz died in battle (PROSE: So Vile a Sin [+]Ben Aaronovitch and Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).) and Chris left to see the universe with a Time Ring after a trip to the House of Lungbarrow, where the Doctor was also asked to collect the Old Master's remains from Skaro. (PROSE: Lungbarrow [+]Marc Platt, adapted from Lungbarrow, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).)

In a differing account, the Doctor tried to have Ace join the Time Lord Academy, though she rejected going, just as they were embroiled in a series of adventures involving Raine Creevy. (AUDIO: Thin Ice [+]Marc Platt, adapted from Ice Time, The Lost Stories (Big Finish Productions, 2011).) After some brief adventures with Bev Tarrant (AUDIO: Dust Breeding [+]Mike Tucker, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2001).) and foiling Elizabeth Klein's temporal scheme at Colditz Castle, (AUDIO: Colditz [+]Steve Lyons, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2001).) the Doctor and Ace were joined by Hex, (AUDIO: The Harvest [+]Dan Abnett, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2004).) who became a key player in the Doctor's feud with the Forge and the Elder Gods. (AUDIO: A Death in the Family [+]Steven Hall, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2010)., Gods and Monsters [+]Mike Maddox and Alan Barnes, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2012).) After Hex left to start a family, (AUDIO: Signs and Wonders [+]Matt Fitton, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2014).) the Doctor was re-joined by Mel. (AUDIO: A Life of Crime [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) In this account, the Doctor still went on to have adventures with Bernice, (AUDIO: Love and War [+]Jacqueline Rayner, adapted from Love and War (Paul Cornell), Novel Adaptations (Big Finish Productions, 2012).) Roz and Chris, (AUDIO: Damaged Goods [+]Jonathan Morris, adapted from Damaged Goods (Russell T Davies), Novel Adaptations: Volume 2 (Novel Adaptations, Big Finish Productions, 2015).) and he reunited with Bernice and Ace for a few more adventures, (AUDIO: Good Night, Sweet Ladies [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) while also taking on Klein as a companion (AUDIO: A Thousand Tiny Wings [+]Andy Lane, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2010).) until her actions rewrote her timeline. (AUDIO: The Architects of History [+]Steve Lyons, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2010).) As Ace had decided to become a Time Lord, (AUDIO: The Lights of Skaro [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) the Doctor found himself reconnecting with old friends like Mags, Harry Sullivan and Naomi Cross to have as companions as he tended to the universe. (AUDIO: The Monsters of Gokroth [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW., London Orbital [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

Eventually, after all his friends had left him, the Doctor dedicated himself to his mission of protecting the history of the universe, (AUDIO: Persuasion [+]Jonathan Barnes, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2013).) even traveling back down his own timeline to attend to his unfinished business and clean up after his previous incarnations. (AUDIO: The Wormery [+]Paul Magrs and Stephen Cole, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2003).) Though he asked some people to become his new companion, (AUDIO: Valhalla [+]Marc Platt, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2007)., The Death Collectors [+]Stewart Sheargold, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2008).) the Doctor resigned himself to a solitary existence, only seeking out his old companions when they proved useful to his plans, which only alienated him further away from them. (AUDIO: Dark Universe [+]Guy Adams, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2020).) However, after an encounter with the Eight Legs, the Doctor decided to embrace his older jollier side before he met his fate, (PROSE: The Eight Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).) allowing him to face his last days with high spirits, (WC: 24 Carat [+]Pete McTighe, Doctor Who: The Collection mini-episodes (YouTube, 2021).) until he gave into his own temptations and tried to manipulate the state of the universe with the Dark Citizen for the greater good, until the true universe was restored by a collection of former companions lead by Ace. Though he tried to apologies for losing control of himself, Ace believed that the Seventh Doctor would always "become something dark", and so arranged for the Doctor to be in the right place at the right time to receive a task from Narvin to collect the Master's remains from Skaro, a task which she knew would prevent him "from going too far" again. (AUDIO: The Last Day [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

After many years of schemes and manipulations, the Seventh Doctor ironically met his end in events out of his control after being caught at the wrong place at the wrong time due to crash-landing in San Francisco on 31 December 1999 while taking the Master's remains from Skaro to Gallifrey. As he realised the Master had somehow survived his execution, the Doctor was shot by a San Francisco gang on the streets and then fatally injured when Dr. Grace Holloway's exploratory surgery on his gunshot wounds accidentally clogged a vein. Due to the anaesthetic in his system, he did not properly regenerate into his next incarnation until several hours had past. (TV: Doctor Who [+]Matthew Jacobs, Doctor Who Television Movie (Fox Broadcasting Company, 1996).)

Other realities[]

Alternate timelines[]

In an alternative timeline, the Doctor was able to save Jan Rydd and his fellow Travellers on Heaven in 2570, and, in another alternative timeline, was beheaded by an Ice Warrior on Peladon in 3985. (PROSE: So Vile a Sin [+]Ben Aaronovitch and Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).)

In one alternative timeline, the Doctor and Ace were captured in Colditz Castle in October 1944. When they tried to escape, Ace was killed, and left behind her walkman. This provided the Nazis with laser technology, which they exploited to win the Second World War. Immediately afterwards, the Doctor returned to Germany in 1955, where he was shot by Nazi soldiers. He later regenerated into an alternative version of his eighth incarnation. (AUDIO: Colditz [+]Steve Lyons, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2001)., Klein's Story [+]John Ainsworth and Lee Mansfield, Survival of the Fittest (Main Range, Big Finish Productions, 2010).)

Averted timelines[]

In a timeline where Elizabeth Klein used the Doctor's TARDIS to rewrite history so that the Nazis won the war, and helped the Galactic Reich conquer potential threats by travelling back in time to give them forewarning, the Doctor, who remembered the correct timeline, was captured and imprisoned on the Moon, but managed to secretly contact the Selachians and supplied them with the necessary technology to destroy the Moonbase. When Klein came to visit the Doctor to find out where his TARDIS was, the Selachians attacked the base. The Doctor and Klein escaped in the TARDIS, where the Doctor informed her that the Time Lords had tried her and found her guilty, and she was erased from history, along with the alternate Doctor, restoring things to their correct order. (AUDIO: The Architects of History [+]Steve Lyons, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2010).)

When the Cybermen allied with Rassilon to take over history, (COMIC: Supremacy of the Cybermen [+]George Mann and Cavan Scott, Titan summer events (Titan Comics, 2016).) the Seventh Doctor was planting Nemesis mines across the Cyber-Fleet when he discovered that Ace had been cyber-converted. (COMIC: Prologue: The Seventh Doctor [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) He was then attacked by Ace. This timeline was eventually unwritten by Rassilon and the Twelfth Doctor. (COMIC: Supremacy of the Cybermen [+]George Mann and Cavan Scott, Titan summer events (Titan Comics, 2016).)

Undone events[]

Ace and 7 LATE

The Seventh Doctor and Ace arrive in the Master's trap. (AUDIO: The Light at the End [+]Nicholas Briggs, Big Finish Doctor Who Special Releases (Big Finish Productions, 2013).)

In a negated timeline, the Doctor and Ace were drawn to land in a pocket universe built on 23 November 1963, where they began to see images of the past and future of the TARDIS, and encountered the Sixth Doctor and Peri Brown, who had also been brought there. Investigating further, the Seventh Doctor discovered that the Decayed Master was also present, and found out that the Master's plot was to erase his timeline by planting a conceptual bomb inside Bob Dovie so that Dovie's inability to accept the Fifth Doctor's TARDIS would cause the TARDIS to explode across its own timeline. After Ace vanished due to the timelines changing, the Seventh Doctor attempted to contact the Time Lords, but was unable to when his TARDIS began to explode. However, the Sixth Doctor was able to bring the Seventh Doctor and his other incarnations together using a dimensional stabiliser, and the Fifth Doctor stopped the bomb from going off by showing Dovie the inside of the TARDIS in 1962, ensuring that he would not consider it impossible when he entered it in 1963. The Seventh Doctor then joined his other seven incarnations in preparing to time ram the Master's TARDIS. However, rather than kill the Master, the First Doctor instead turned off the automatic distress actions, which had brought all of the Doctors to the pocket dimension and triggered the TARDIS' destruction, making it so none of that had happened. (AUDIO: The Light at the End [+]Nicholas Briggs, Big Finish Doctor Who Special Releases (Big Finish Productions, 2013).)

Parallel universes[]

Events similar to the Doctor's adventure on the Silurian Earth (PROSE: Blood Heat [+]Jim Mortimore, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) were experienced by Doctor Jon St. Myth of the Collapsing Universe. (PROSE: Blood Heat Second Iteration [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

Psychological profile[]

Personality[]

Pensive Seven

The Doctor considers the consequences of a decision he has to make. (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).)

The Seventh Doctor was originally light-hearted and prone to clownish behaviour (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989).) that masked his true intellect and courage. (PROSE: Infinite Requiem [+]Daniel Blythe, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) However, as he matured, he became a grumpy and melancholy manipulator (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) who saw the battle between good and evil as a game of chess or a stage play, and everyone around him as pawns in the game of fighting evil that he directed, (PROSE: Timewyrm: Revelation [+]Paul Cornell, adapted from Total Eclipse, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1991)., The Highest Science [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993)., Head Games [+]Steve Lyons, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995)., Illegal Alien [+]Mike Tucker and Robert Perry, adapted from Illegal Alien, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).) though he hated himself for it, (PROSE: Iceberg [+]David Banks, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993)., Blood Heat [+]Jim Mortimore, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) instead desiring a life of playing the spoons and acting as a children's entertainer with his magic tricks. (PROSE: The Also People [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995)., Return of the Living Dad [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996)., Heritage [+]Dale Smith, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2002).) Despite his darker demeanour, the Seventh Doctor was "not without [his] share of mirth and joviality", and claimed to Ace that he could be "quite the funny fellow", (PROSE: Fable Fusion [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) though he found it hard to put his trust in others. (COMIC: Younger and Wiser [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

Seeing himself as a "chess master", (PROSE: Illegal Alien [+]Mike Tucker and Robert Perry, adapted from Illegal Alien, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).) the Seventh Doctor was a consummate fan of chess, to the point of treating his companions and enemies as pieces on a chess board, (TV: Silver Nemesis [+]Kevin Clarke, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1 and TVNZ, 1988)., Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) until he tired of the game in favour of hopscotch. (PROSE: Infinite Requiem [+]Daniel Blythe, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) He habitually lied to keep others at ease, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Survival [+]Rona Munro, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) and preferred to explain "one thing at a time". (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).) While he was known for his preference on using words to resolve a problem instead of violence, (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) and preferred to fight fairly, (PROSE: Rice Pudding [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) the Doctor was not adverse to letting his adversaries be the architects of their own unmaking. (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., Silver Nemesis [+]Kevin Clarke, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1 and TVNZ, 1988).)

Although his more whimsical tendencies disappeared over time, the Doctor maintained a fondness for idiosyncratic speeches that occasionally referred to literature, ordinary places and even food and drink amidst the weightier concerns on his mind. (TV: Survival [+]Rona Munro, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) When deducing grandiloquent plans to rule the universe, he considered their destruction of small everyday pleasures, like art and music, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) and often mocked his enemies' grandiose plans by incorporating foods into their list of ambitions. (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) In his more serious moments, however, the Doctor would sombrely reflect the ramifications of time and the consequences of interfering in history, (TV: Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).) as well as his life of aimless travel. (COMIC: Culture Shock! [+]Grant Morrison, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1988).)

While his previous incarnations would stumble upon trouble by happenstance, the Seventh Doctor actively sought out villains to vanquish and dictatorships to dethrone, (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., The Happiness Patrol [+]Graeme Curry, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) getting involved in local affairs without question, (PROSE: Cat's Cradle: Warhead [+]Andrew Cartmel, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992).) and was much less forgiving than his preceding incarnation, (AUDIO: Project Lazarus [+]Cavan Scott and Mark Wright, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2003).) due to the Sixth Doctor's decision to let his morality and scruples die with him in his final moments. (AUDIO: The Brink of Death [+]Nicholas Briggs, The Sixth Doctor: The Last Adventure (Big Finish Productions, 2015).) The Doctor would claim[who?] that he served as Time's Champion because of "principles, truth, love and harmony, peace and goodwill, [and] the best of intentions." (PROSE: Return of the Living Dad [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).)

Kill her

The Doctor challenges Fenric to kill Ace. (TV: The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).)

Despite viewing himself as "a nice little man in a silly jumper", (AUDIO: Harvest of the Sycorax [+]James Goss, Classic Doctors and New Monsters: Volume One (Classic Doctors, New Monsters, Big Finish Productions, 2016).) he was viewed as being the most dangerous of the Doctors by UNIT, (AUDIO: Persuasion [+]Jonathan Barnes, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2013).) and would often only see the "bigger picture" rather than the world before him, (PROSE: Head Games [+]Steve Lyons, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) which resulted in him causing much grief, such as devastating Ace by labelling her an "emotional cripple" to weaken Fenric's power by making her abandon her faith in him. (TV: The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) However, he was not totally unfeeling, appearing apprehensive about his decision to destroy Skaro, (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).) was genuinely agonised that he had to convince Ace that he did not care about her, (TV: The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) and told Ellen Woodworth that "the end[s] never [justified] the means, [as] the means used [determined] the kind of end produced." (PROSE: Christmas on a Rational Planet [+]Lawrence Miles, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).)

Nearing the end of his life, the Doctor decided to retire from his niche of manipulation.[source needed] Feeling guilty and tired from his plotting, (TV: The Curse of Fenric [+]Pete McTighe, Tales of the TARDIS (BBC iPlayer, 2023).) he acknowledged he had lived past his prime and would soon regenerate.[source needed] Fearing that his next incarnation would not want to continue plans that he had set in motion, the Doctor put all his affairs in order to leave nothing unsung when his time drew to a close. (AUDIO: Persuasion [+]Jonathan Barnes, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2013).) However, after being saved from one of the Eight Legs by the Eighth Doctor, he became determined to enjoy every minute he had left. After the Eighth Doctor warned him of a trap by the Old Master, the Seventh Doctor decided not to think about it, and let fate decide when and how his life would end, instead of despairing over being alone. (PROSE: The Eight Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).)

Feeling that he "belong[ed]" in open space, (AUDIO: Unregenerate! [+]David A. McIntee, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2005).) the Seventh Doctor longed for exploration, and bemoaned how young people had "no spirit of adventure", distaining at taking downtime when he could be experiencing enjoyment in new scientific discoveries. (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) He also had a soft spot for jazz music, (TV: Silver Nemesis [+]Kevin Clarke, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1 and TVNZ, 1988).) conkers, (COMIC: Doctor Conkerer! [+]Ian Rimmer, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1990).) the Beatles, cats, (PROSE: Return of the Living Dad [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) science fiction, (PROSE: Bad Therapy [+]Matthew Jones, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) baseball, (PROSE: Illegal Alien [+]Mike Tucker and Robert Perry, adapted from Illegal Alien, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).) composer J. S. Bach, (PROSE: The Algebra of Ice [+]Lloyd Rose, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2004).) and The Wizard of Oz. (AUDIO: The Settling [+]Simon Guerrier, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2006).) He also admired rats (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) and enjoyed collecting pins. (PROSE: Lucifer Rising [+]Jim Mortimore and Andy Lane, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).)

Though the Doctor initially encouraged Ace not to call him "Professor", (TV: Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) he later confessed that he liked the nickname. (AUDIO: Thin Ice [+]Marc Platt, adapted from Ice Time, The Lost Stories (Big Finish Productions, 2011).) He also told Bernice Summerfield that he loved "chaos, big explosions, and rebellions", (PROSE: Love and War [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992).) described E flat minor as his favourite musical key, gave blue as his favourite colour, (PROSE: Lucifer Rising [+]Jim Mortimore and Andy Lane, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) and claimed that having his hair cut relaxed him more than anything. (PROSE: The Left-Handed Hummingbird [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) He also enjoyed playing nine dimensional scrabble, (PROSE: St Anthony's Fire [+]Mark Gatiss, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) and "doing interviews". (PROSE: Happy Endings [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) When thinking about rewards he could seek for his actions, the Doctor thought about "the smile of a baby child, the first sunset on a soft and new-born world, [and] the taste of the purest spring water, untouched by any pollution of Man's making." (PROSE: The Dimension Riders [+]Daniel Blythe, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).)

The Doctor hated wasted journeys, (COMIC: Nemesis of the Daleks [+]<span class="NWLH" title="Richard Starkings (as Richard Alan)
John Tomlinson (as Steve Alan)">Richard Starkings
, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1989).) unrequited love, tyranny, cruelty, (TV: Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) the writings of Stanoff Osterling, (PROSE: Theatre of War [+]Justin Richards, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) the over usage of semicolons, (COMIC: Plastic Millenium [+]Gareth Roberts, DWMS comic stories (Marvel Comics, 1994).) swimming, (PROSE: The Also People [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) and goodbyes. (PROSE: The Room With No Doors [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).) He also saw bus stations as "terrible places full of lost luggage and lost souls", (TV: Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) and had little respect for those who chose not to fight injustice when they had the power to. (PROSE: Cat's Cradle: Warhead [+]Andrew Cartmel, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992).)

Maintaining a strict vegetarian diet, (PROSE: Human Nature [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995)., Happy Endings [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996)., Return of the Living Dad [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996)., The Room With No Doors [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997)., Lungbarrow [+]Marc Platt, adapted from Lungbarrow, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997)., Relative Dementias [+]Mark Michalowski, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2002)., Citadel of Dreams [+]Dave Stone, Telos Doctor Who novellas (Telos Publishing, 2002).) the Doctor enjoyed almond slices, (PROSE: The Dimension Riders [+]Daniel Blythe, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) liquorice, and apricotts. (PROSE: Rice Pudding [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) He took five to six sugars in his tea, (AUDIO: House of Blue Fire [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) with his favourite teas being Arcturan, Earl Grey and Lapsang souchong, (PROSE: Lucifer Rising [+]Jim Mortimore and Andy Lane, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) his favourite ice cream being boysenberry ripple, (PROSE: The Left-Handed Hummingbird [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) and his favourite biscuits being chocolate HobNobs. (PROSE: Cold Fusion [+]Lance Parkin, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) While he didn't like peppermint tea, he drank some when it was a gift from a friend. (PROSE: Notre Dame du Temps [+]Nick Clark, Short Trips: Companions (Short Trips, 2003).}) He preferred having water to drink when at Maruthea, (COMIC: Party Animals [+]Gary Russell, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1991).) but did have an enjoyment for Fizzade (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) and lemonade. (PROSE: Just War [+]Lance Parkin, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) However, he "[couldn't] stand" burned toast, (TV: Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) or the taste of pears. (PROSE: Human Nature [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).)

The Seventh Doctor though that "anybody remotely interesting [was] mad in some way or another", (TV: The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989).) believed evil to be a genuine force, (PROSE: Strange England [+]Simon Messingham, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) and considered pacifism to be a "noble ideal". (AUDIO: Fiesta of the Damned [+]Guy Adams, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2016).)

Seeing the future as being built by one's own hands, he believed that there was always hope for a tomorrow in which "life [was] worth living". However, when faced with the truly nihilistic, the Doctor would abandon them to the fates they did not want to escape. (COMIC: Time and Tide [+]Richard Alan and John Carnell, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1989).)

According to Ace, while the Doctor "wasn't scared of monsters or pain or dying, he was scared of being alone," (PROSE: The Left-Handed Hummingbird [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) though he would decide later in life to travel alone after a devastating incident made him realise that he couldn't trust himself with anyone's life. (AUDIO: The Resurrection of Mars [+]Jonathan Morris, Eighth Doctor Adventures (Big Finish Productions, 2010).) He once had a frightful experience in Rita Hawks's bubble car, (PROSE: Loving the Alien [+]Mike Tucker and Robert Perry, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2003).) and also admitted to the Mi'en Kalarash that he was afraid of the Old Time, the Times of Night and Chaos. (AUDIO: House of Blue Fire [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

Believing that "two wrongs [didn't] make a [right]", (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) the Seventh Doctor was opposed to violence of any sort, although he proved capable of rendering an opponent unconscious with a touch to the forehead (TV: Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., Survival [+]Rona Munro, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) by using the Venusian nerve pinch. (PROSE: Timewyrm: Exodus [+]Terrance Dicks, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1991).) While he was completely against the use of firearms, (TV: Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) seeing them as the "tinker toy resort of frustrated [and] hopeless individuals", (COMIC: Cuckoo [+]Dan Abnett, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1993-1994).) the Doctor was willing to use a Tissue Compression Eliminator to defend himself against Death's Head, (COMIC: The Crossroads of Time [+]Simon Furman, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1988).) and used a gun to kill Legion (PROSE: Lucifer Rising [+]Jim Mortimore and Andy Lane, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) and to disable Eva Jericho. (PROSE: Damaged Goods [+]Russell T Davies, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).)

While he protested that no one had the right to kill, (TV: Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) he would orchestrate a death if it benefited his plans, (TV: The Happiness Patrol [+]Graeme Curry, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).) believing "killing [to be] wrong except when it's right". (PROSE: Original Sin [+]Andy Lane, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) While he refused to shoot the Master when it served no purpose, (PROSE: First Frontier [+]David A. McIntee, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) the Seventh Doctor was not averse to manipulating events that resulted in the loss of life, (PROSE: Love and War [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992)., Eternity Weeps [+]Jim Mortimore, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).) taking a life by himself, (PROSE: Lucifer Rising [+]Jim Mortimore and Andy Lane, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) or convincing someone to commit suicide. (PROSE: Zamper [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995)., Just War [+]Lance Parkin, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996)., Loving the Alien [+]Mike Tucker and Robert Perry, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2003)., Utopia [+]Darren Sellars, Short Trips: Farewells (Short Trips short stories, 2006).) He also played a part in the destruction of many planets, such as Skaro, (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).) the Seven Planets, (PROSE: The Pit [+]Neil Penswick, adapted from Hostage, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) and the Silurian Earth, (PROSE: Blood Heat [+]Jim Mortimore, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) and confessed to Red that a part of him enjoyed destroying worlds, (AUDIO: Red [+]Stewart Sheargold, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2006).) though he regretted their destruction either way. (PROSE: The Algebra of Ice [+]Lloyd Rose, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2004).)

The Doctor did his best to keep history on track, such as by ensuring he left nothing anachronistic behind when in the past. (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).)

The Doctor would attempt to embrace the customs of the cultures he visited, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) and greet anything he thought was sentient with a friendly smile. (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) However, he could get so caught up in the moment that he overlooked the finer details of the situation. (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).)

While combating Adam Mitchell's Autons, the Seventh Doctor associated himself with his first and second incarnations, combining with them to think of a solution to the situation. (COMIC: Endgame [+]Scott & David Tipton, Prisoners of Time (IDW Publishing, 2013).)

While he was of the opinion that his third and fourth incarnations were not unattractive, (PROSE: The Algebra of Ice [+]Lloyd Rose, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2004).) he regretfully felt that his fourth incarnation had "condemned untold billions to death by not destroying the Daleks at the moment of their birth", and resented that his fifth incarnation "could have saved billions more by shooting down Davros like a mad dog when [he] had the chance". (PROSE: Lucifer Rising [+]Jim Mortimore and Andy Lane, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) He also thought he himself looked more "respectable" than his fourth and sixth incarnations, (PROSE: Loving the Alien [+]Mike Tucker and Robert Perry, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2003).) and thought his third incarnation was "a real dandy of a fellow". (COMIC: Under Pressure [+]Dan Abnett, Doctor Who Yearbook comic stories (Marvel Comics UK, 1991).) However, when he encountered an incarnation he did not recognise, the Seventh Doctor acted civil towards him and engaged in a pleasant conversation while a fight erupted around them. (COMIC: Party Animals [+]Gary Russell, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1991).)

The Seventh Doctor was generally disliked by his other incarnations. (AUDIO: The Shadow of the Scourge [+]Paul Cornell, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2000).) The Fifth Doctor was repulsed by his manipulative nature, (PROSE: Cold Fusion [+]Lance Parkin, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) and the Sixth Doctor told Evelyn Smythe that his successor was "always blowing up planets", something he was "not looking forward to". (AUDIO: The 100 Days of the Doctor [+]Paul Cornell, 100 (Main Range, Big Finish Productions, 2007).) The Eleventh Doctor described his seventh incarnation as "probably one of [his] more circumspect periods." (AUDIO: Shockwave [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

The Eighth Doctor described his immediate predecessor as "a paranoid chap at times, but then often with good reason[s]", (PROSE: War of the Daleks [+]John Peel, adapted from War of the Daleks, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).) and eventually came to view his manipulative nature with disdain, telling Lucie Miller that he was always "the man with the master plan," arranging the destruction of his enemies and the toppling of dictatorships in order to serve the greater good, to the point where he began to countenance sacrificing the lives of the few to save the many, in which he negatively compared the Seventh Doctor to the Monk. (AUDIO: The Resurrection of Mars [+]Jonathan Morris, Eighth Doctor Adventures (Big Finish Productions, 2010).)

Despite his manipulative actions, such as using psychic powers to make Mel leave with Sabalom Glitz, (PROSE: Head Games [+]Steve Lyons, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) the Seventh Doctor did care for his companions, (AUDIO: The Fearmonger [+]Jonathan Blum, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2000).) focusing on their wounds before his own, (PROSE: Set Piece [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) and even sought their approval on occasion. (PROSE: Head Games [+]Steve Lyons, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) He believed he would act as a surrogate granddad to Bernice Summerfield's children, (PROSE: SLEEPY [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) and later gave her away at her wedding to Jason Kane. (PROSE: Happy Endings [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) He did not like others fiddling with his TARDIS, even slapping Ace's hand when she tried using the console control. (TV: Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).)

Although he originally invited her to travel with him to combat Fenric, (PROSE: Head Games [+]Steve Lyons, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) the Doctor developed a paternal relationship with Ace, (TV: Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) eventually coming to trust Ace with his life. (AUDIO: The High Price of Parking [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) Ace, considering the Doctor to be her "guru", (AUDIO: Nightshade [+]adapted from Nightshade (Mark Gatiss), Novel Adaptations (Big Finish Productions, 2016).) believed that he had the "deepest, saddest eyes", (AUDIO: The Prisoner's Dilemma [+]Simon Guerrier, The Companion Chronicles (Big Finish Productions, 2009).) and even told him that she loved him. (AUDIO: Signs and Wonders [+]Matt Fitton, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2014).) However, after she found herself unable to deal with his growing emotional coldness, (PROSE: Nightshade [+]Mark Gatiss, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992).) Ace walked out on the Doctor after he had arranged for the death of Jan Rydd, whom she had fallen in love with. (PROSE: Love and War [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992).) Even after she re-joined his company, (PROSE: Deceit [+]Peter Darvill-Evans, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) it was only so she could use him for her own goals, (PROSE: Lucifer Rising [+]Jim Mortimore and Andy Lane, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) believing it to be poetic justice for his own manipulations. (PROSE: Conundrum [+]Steve Lyons, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) Their relationship would remain sour, (PROSE: Blood Heat [+]Jim Mortimore, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) until they worked together to defeat Mortimus, (PROSE: No Future [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) after which they realised how much they needed each other's friendship. (PROSE: Tragedy Day [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) Ace eventually decided that, whilst the Doctor "may be a bastard", he was "still [her] bastard", (PROSE: Head Games [+]Steve Lyons, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) and that she could trust him "to sort out anything". (PROSE: The Death of Art [+]Simon Bucher-Jones, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).)

While his favourite planet was Earth, (COMIC: The Crossroads of Time [+]Simon Furman, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1988).) the Doctor could also be critical of human nature, stating that humans had "the most amazing capacity for self-deception, matched only by [their] ingenuity when trying to destroy [themselves]", (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).) that "among all the varied wonders of the universe, [there was] nothing so firmly clamped shut as the military mind", (TV: Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) and that their expectation that "everything [had] to be within [their] comprehension" was their "most irksome trait." (PROSE: The Dimension Riders [+]Daniel Blythe, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) While he once voiced his opinion that their evolution was a "miscalculation", (TV: Silver Nemesis [+]Kevin Clarke, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1 and TVNZ, 1988).) the Doctor admitted to Mikey that, despite their illogical behaviour, he found human beings irresistible. (PROSE: Bad Therapy [+]Matthew Jones, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).)

While his human counterpart fell in love with Joan Redfern, (PROSE: Human Nature [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) the Doctor himself was decidedly celibate, (PROSE: Death and Diplomacy [+]Dave Stone, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) failing to understand human attraction and affection, (PROSE: Cat's Cradle: Warhead [+]Andrew Cartmel, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992).) except when it came to Ace, (PROSE: Timewyrm: Exodus [+]Terrance Dicks, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1991).) of whom he loved in a paternal way. (TV: The Curse of Fenric [+]Pete McTighe, Tales of the TARDIS (BBC iPlayer, 2023).) However, Ace noted that the Doctor had chemistry with Maid Mackenzie of the Campbell Ancestral Home, with the Doctor also appearing crestfallen when he had to say goodbye to her. (COMIC: Cat and Mouse [+]Scott & David Tipton, Prisoners of Time (IDW Publishing, 2013).)

Seeing them as the "most evil race in the universe", (COMIC: Terror from the Deep [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) the Seventh Doctor harboured a strong hatred for the Daleks, refusing to believe that a single timeline existed where they were benevolent. (PROSE: The Ripple Effect [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) He also distrusted the Ice Warriors, even after they renounced conflict. (PROSE: Legacy [+]Gary Russell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).)

While Ace frequently described the Seventh Doctor as an "aging hippy", (TV: The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989).; PROSE: No Future [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994)., Set Piece [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) Guy de Carnac compared the Doctor to an owl, observing that "he [was] comfortable in the darkness", and also though the Doctor "[was] equally as adept at hunting down prey in cold blood". (PROSE: Sanctuary [+]David A. McIntee, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) Fakrid believed the Doctor had "the mind of a genius", but also "prattle[d] like any other parasite". (PROSE: The Highest Science [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) Dr. Smith, who initially saw the Doctor as a "great scientist", quickly changed her opinion of him to that of "an entertainer who might be hired for a children's party" after the Doctor started enthusiastically rambling. (PROSE: Zamper [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) Lieutenant Frethil believed he "reek[ed] of subversion and dissent." (COMIC: The Grief [+]Dan Abnett, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1992).)

The "Beryl Reid" Iris described the Seventh Doctor as "a portentous little feller, swaggering around, thinking he's got all the world's darkest secrets under his hat." (PROSE: The Scarlet Empress [+]Paul Magrs, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1998).) Brigadier General Adrienne Kramer described him as "a manipulative little weirdo who was always up to something behind [her] back." (PROSE: Vampire Science [+]Kate Orman and Jonathan Blum, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).) When she encountered the Seventh Doctor shortly before her death, Evelyn Smythe criticised him for his scheming, manipulative nature, (AUDIO: A Death in the Family [+]Steven Hall, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2010).) while Melanie Bush described the man he became as "a liar and a user and quite possibly a murderer", and proclaimed that she wanted nothing more to do with him. (PROSE: Head Games [+]Steve Lyons, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) When the Eighth Doctor had a tarot card reading, the Seventh Doctor was identified as "the Hanged Man". (PROSE: The City of the Dead [+]Lloyd Rose, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2001).)

The Reborn Master described the Seventh Doctor as a "tiresome little man with [an] umbrella", (AUDIO: Eyes of the Master [+]Matt Fitton, Dark Eyes 2 (The Eighth Doctor Adventures: Dark Eyes, Big Finish Productions, 2014).) and as "a wily one", (AUDIO: The Two Masters [+]John Dorney, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2016).) while the Tremas Master described him as being "too busy setting plans and traps" to realise the ones "set for him". (GAME: Destiny of the Doctors [+]Hannah Redler, Gary Russell, Terrance Dicks and Andy Russell, BBC Multimedia (1997).) Jason considered the Seventh Doctor "no fun" due to his secret keeping and "tantrums". (PROSE: Conundrum [+]Steve Lyons, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).)

Alan Fitzgerald, a summer intern at the Gogglebox, believed that the Seventh Doctor knew everything. (AUDIO: The Gathering [+]Joseph Lidster, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2006).) The Black Dalek considered the Doctor's apparent ruthlessness to be "impressive". (AUDIO: Enemy of the Daleks [+]David Bishop, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2009).) The Doctor's first TARDIS described the Seventh Doctor as "the schemer". (AUDIO: Prisoners of Fate [+]Jonathan Morris, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2013).) Helen referred to him as "the Thinker". (AUDIO: The Sirens of Time [+]Nicholas Briggs, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 1999).)

Though he was afraid of it, (PROSE: Parasite [+]Jim Mortimore, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) the Doctor wished to die alone, (PROSE: Transit [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992).) unconscious and on his own terms, (PROSE: The Room With No Doors [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).) and also believed it would be best if all traces of him were erased. (PROSE: Transit [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992).) While the Doctor originally thought he would "beat chance and choose the moment to die", he later confessed to Benny that he knew he would die "[without] control, surrounded by strangers, [and] helpless." (PROSE: Return of the Living Dad [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) He later told Chris Cwej that he viewed regenerating as both a good and bad feeling in the same way that driving a car very fast was exhilarating despite the potentially fatal outcome, with the Doctor calling regeneration a "miniature death". (PROSE: The Room With No Doors [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).)

As he pleaded with Grace Holloway not to operate on him after he got shot in a gang shootout in San Francisco, (TV: Doctor Who [+]Matthew Jacobs, Doctor Who Television Movie (Fox Broadcasting Company, 1996).) the Doctor privately despaired how it was "not [his] time" and that he had "too much left to do". (AUDIO: Zagreus [+]Alan Barnes and Gary Russell, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2003).) Before he let out a final scream as he died, (TV: Doctor Who [+]Matthew Jacobs, Doctor Who Television Movie (Fox Broadcasting Company, 1996).) Holloway noted that the Doctor seemed "very clear, very determined and very powerful", while also looking "very serious, but also very frightened of something", and felt that he was "rarely afraid of anything". (PROSE: The Novel of the Film [+]Gary Russell, adapted from Doctor Who (Matthew Jacobs), BBC Books novelisations (BBC Books, 1996).) A mental manifestation of the Seventh Doctor within the Doctor's mind later lamented that his demise was "[un]dignified" and expressed annoyance that he "[hadn't seen] that one coming". (AUDIO: Zagreus [+]Alan Barnes and Gary Russell, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2003).)

Habits and quirks[]

The Seventh Doctor spoke with a Scottish accent, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) which Bernice Summerfield noted was of the Highlands. (PROSE: Big Bang Generation [+]Gary Russell, BBC New Series Adventures (BBC Books, 2015).) However, when necessary, the Doctor adopted other accents too. (PROSE: The Highest Science [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993)., No Future [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994)., Bad Therapy [+]Matthew Jones, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996)., The Room With No Doors [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).) When talking about Daleks, his voice would develop a harder edge to it. (PROSE: Illegal Alien [+]Mike Tucker and Robert Perry, adapted from Illegal Alien, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).)

He occasionally displayed a tendency to mangle and combine Earth idioms, creating Dundrearyisms. (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Delta and the Bannermen [+]Malcolm Kohll, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) After Mel described the habit as "really annoying", the Doctor promised that he would try to stop doing it, (AUDIO: Bang-Bang-a-Boom! [+]Gareth Roberts and Clayton Hickman, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2002).) though would later slip up on his promise long after she had left the TARDIS. (COMIC: Culture Shock! [+]Grant Morrison, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1988).; PROSE: White Darkness [+]David A. McIntee, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993)., No Future [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994)., Sanctuary [+]David A. McIntee, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995)., The Also People [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).)

The Seventh Doctor would often introduce himself by saying, "I'm the Doctor, and this is my friend…" (TV: Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989)., Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).)

He sometimes described a situation as "splendid", (TV: Delta and the Bannermen [+]Malcolm Kohll, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., The Happiness Patrol [+]Graeme Curry, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) and would say that "monsters" feared him in their "nightmares". (PROSE: Love and War [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992)., Blood Heat [+]Jim Mortimore, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993)., Continuity Errors [+]Steven Moffat, Decalog 3: Consequences (Virgin Decalogs, 1996)., Return of the Living Dad [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).; AUDIO: The Shadow of the Scourge [+]Paul Cornell, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2000).)

The Doctor was fond of using the term "grubby" when explaining his mission to keep an artefact away from his adversaries, such as when keeping the Hand of Omega out of the Daleks' "grubby little protuberances", (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).) when he sent the TARDIS away to keep the Robot Ants from getting their "grubby little mandibles" on it, (PROSE: Set Piece [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) and when preventing the fake skull of Jesus Christ from falling into Louis de Citeaux and Francisco Guzman's "grubby little protuberances". (PROSE: Sanctuary [+]David A. McIntee, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).)

While he sometimes rested both hands on his hips, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Silver Nemesis [+]Kevin Clarke, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1 and TVNZ, 1988)., The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989).) the Seventh Doctor would more often place a single hand on his hip while gesturing with his other hand, (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Delta and the Bannermen [+]Malcolm Kohll, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Untitled [+]Doctor Who series adverts (BBC1, 1988)., Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., Silver Nemesis [+]Kevin Clarke, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1 and TVNZ, 1988)., Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., Search Out Space [+]Lambros Atteshlis and Berry-Anne Billingsley, Search Out Science (BBC Two, 1990).) such as by grasping a single hand on his lapel. (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Silver Nemesis [+]Kevin Clarke, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1 and TVNZ, 1988)., Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., Survival [+]Rona Munro, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., The Curse of Fenric [+]Pete McTighe, Tales of the TARDIS (BBC iPlayer, 2023).)

He also made a habit of propping himself up on an arm when lounging on something, (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., Silver Nemesis [+]Kevin Clarke, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1 and TVNZ, 1988)., Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) and leaning on his umbrellas with both hands. (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Untitled [+]Doctor Who series adverts (BBC1, 1988)., Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., The Happiness Patrol [+]Graeme Curry, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989)., The Curse of Fenric [+]Pete McTighe, Tales of the TARDIS (BBC iPlayer, 2023).)

While he would mostly raise his hat as a friendly greeting and a farewell, the Doctor would also raise his hat in mockery as he escaped a defeated adversary or when his enemies retreated. (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., The Happiness Patrol [+]Graeme Curry, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).)

He often held his hands crossed behind his back as he leaned forwards, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Delta and the Bannermen [+]Malcolm Kohll, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989)., Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., The Disney Club [+]Disney specials (ITV, 1994).) and strutted about with his hands in his trouser pockets. (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).)

As a show of affection, the Doctor would gently tap his friends on the nose. (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989).,Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).)

When in thought, he would rub his fingers with his thumb, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Silver Nemesis [+]Kevin Clarke, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1 and TVNZ, 1988)., The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989)., Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., Survival [+]Rona Munro, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) tug at his ear, (TV: Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989)., Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) scratch at his mouth, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., The Happiness Patrol [+]Graeme Curry, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989)., Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., Survival [+]Rona Munro, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., Dimensions in Time [+]John Nathan-Turner and David Roden, Doctor Who 30th anniversary special (BBC1, 1993)., The Disney Club [+]Disney specials (ITV, 1994).) or use his umbrella to play with his lips. (TV: Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., The Happiness Patrol [+]Graeme Curry, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., Survival [+]Rona Munro, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).)

The Seventh Doctor made a habit of randomly reading books with "Doctor" in the title, (TV: Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).) and would sometimes backflip his hat onto his head. (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., Survival [+]Rona Munro, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).)

When his companions acted in a way that was detrimental to his plans by reacting prematurely, the Doctor would warn them not to act with a stern, "Not now".[source needed]

Skills[]

Dimension Riders crop

The Doctor faces the Garvond in a game of chess. (PROSE: The Dimension Riders [+]Daniel Blythe, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).)

The Seventh Doctor was a grand manipulator, often utilising his choice of words to persuade others into a decision of his choosing, (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., The Happiness Patrol [+]Graeme Curry, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).) or devising an unscrupulous scheme to defeat his adversaries. (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) He had a tendency to play the long game in his schemes, preferring to keep his plans subtle and "behind the scenes", (PROSE: Cat's Cradle: Warhead [+]Andrew Cartmel, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992)., The Highest Science [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) but would often focus on overcomplicating his plans to the point that he overlooked a more simpler approach. (PROSE: Of the Mermaid and Jupiter [+]Ian Mond and Danny Heap, Short Trips: Past Tense (Short Trips, 2004).) When his plans went awry, or an unexpected element developed, the Doctor was efficient at improvising solutions. (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) However, as he got older, his power of persuasion weakened, with the Doctor unable to convince Grace Holloway not to operate on him. (TV: Doctor Who [+]Matthew Jacobs, Doctor Who Television Movie (Fox Broadcasting Company, 1996).)

Despite his stature, the Doctor was capable of both directly and indirectly taking control of situations involving strangers, using his greater intelligence to assess and direct events. (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., The Happiness Patrol [+]Graeme Curry, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).) Even though he loathed using violence, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) he also showed a skill at unarmed combat, being able to briefly overpower a judo trained Mel, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) wrestle a Cheetah virus infected Master, (TV: Survival [+]Rona Munro, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) strike down two Hitler Youths with a series of slaps, (PROSE: Timewyrm: Exodus [+]Terrance Dicks, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1991).) and disarm Aoi using martial arts. (PROSE: The Room With No Doors [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).) He also possessed the strength to bend a gun barrel as a demonstration, (PROSE: Independence Day [+]Peter Darvill-Evans, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2000).) and could still best Grendel of Gracht in a swordfight. (PROSE: The Trials of Tara [+]Paul Cornell, Decalog 2: Lost Property (Virgin Decalogs, 1995).)

Something of a showman, the Seventh Doctor was an adept physical performer, and deployed a repertoire of magic tricks, illusions and escape artistry as part of his plans. (TV: The Happiness Patrol [+]Graeme Curry, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989)., Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) He could escape from handcuffs, (COMIC: Final Genesis [+]Warwick Gray, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1993).) juggle five balls with his feet while standing on his head and gargling "The Star-Spangled Banner" (PROSE: Lucifer Rising [+]Jim Mortimore and Andy Lane, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) and whistle with a small bomb in his mouth, (PROSE: The Also People [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) but he could not dance. (PROSE: Bad Therapy [+]Matthew Jones, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) He also possessed the necessary accuracy to lasso a small target and improvise a zip wire, (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).) was capable of picking a lock with a hairpin, (PROSE: The Death of Art [+]Simon Bucher-Jones, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) and could crack a safe by listening to the turns of its dial. (AUDIO: Lurkers at Sunlight's Edge [+]Marty Ross, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2010).)

With a thought process that worked faster than his mouth, (PROSE: The Also People [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) the Doctor could memories entire files after flicking through them, (PROSE: Blood Harvest [+]Terrance Dicks, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994)., Bad Therapy [+]Matthew Jones, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) and was capable of mentally keeping up with a ship that thought picoseconds was a long time. (PROSE: The Also People [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).)

With a touch to the head, the Doctor could read minds, (PROSE: Love and War [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992).) calm a person, (PROSE: Blood Heat [+]Jim Mortimore, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993)., Legacy [+]Gary Russell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994)., Head Games [+]Steve Lyons, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) erase memories, (PROSE: No Future [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) induce someone to sleep, (PROSE: GodEngine [+]Craig Hinton, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) and read a person's dreams, (PROSE: SLEEPY [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) though he could also influence people's decisions with just a stare and a quiet voice. (TV: Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) He was also able to receive telepathic distress call, (COMIC: Culture Shock! [+]Grant Morrison, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1988).) telepathically link himself with the Silurians, (PROSE: Blood Heat [+]Jim Mortimore, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) and set up a psychological block in Sally Morgan's limbic system by touching her forehead. (AUDIO: House of Blue Fire [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) However, his powers of hypnotism had different results on different cultures in different ages, and he occasionally needed aide to successfully hypnotise someone. (PROSE: Companion Piece [+]Robert Perry and Mike Tucker, Telos Doctor Who novellas (Telos Publishing, 2003).)

After opening a surgery in the alternate universe TARDIS, the Doctor was able to remove genetic implants from soldiers modified by the Skrak, and sew Sareth's hand back on to him while doing so. (PROSE: Death and Diplomacy [+]Dave Stone, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) He could also perform CPR. (PROSE: Bad Therapy [+]Matthew Jones, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).)

The Doctor could see in the dark, (PROSE: Timewyrm: Genesys [+]John Peel, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1991).) and his sense of smell was sensitive enough for him to differentiate between ketones, ammonia, amino acids, aldehydes, butyric acid and geosmin in cheese, though he could choose to switch off the part of his brain that identified the chemicals to enjoy the taste of the cheese. (PROSE: Culture War [+]Kate Orman, Short Trips: 2040 (Short Trips short stories, 2004).) He could also identify blood samples by taste, (PROSE: Bad Therapy [+]Matthew Jones, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) see ultraviolet light, (PROSE: The Room With No Doors [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).) and perform a biochemical analysis by drinking chemicals. (PROSE: Independence Day [+]Peter Darvill-Evans, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2000).)

The Seventh Doctor also showed a knack for playing the spoons as a musical instrument, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., The Happiness Patrol [+]Graeme Curry, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988)., The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989)., The Curse of Fenric [+]Pete McTighe, Tales of the TARDIS (BBC iPlayer, 2023).) though he was known to play them less as he matured into schemer. (AUDIO: Master [+]Joseph Lidster, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2003).) Representing Earth in lieu of Nicky Newman, he won the 309th Intergalactic Song Contest by playing the spoons, (AUDIO: Bang-Bang-a-Boom! [+]Gareth Roberts and Clayton Hickman, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2002).) and also broke the galactic record for continuous spoon-playing, with sixty-seven hours to his name. (PROSE: The Also People [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) He could also play the harmonica, (PROSE: The Pit [+]Neil Penswick, adapted from Hostage, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) and the piano. (PROSE: Blood Harvest [+]Terrance Dicks, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).)

He could ride a motorcycle, (TV: Delta and the Bannermen [+]Malcolm Kohll, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) drive a van, (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).) and was still capable of driving Bessie. (TV: Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) He could also ride a horse, (TV: Survival [+]Rona Munro, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) and pilot a helicopter. (PROSE: Eternity Weeps [+]Jim Mortimore, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).)

He was also an admired chief, able to work as a cook on the Schirron Dream, (PROSE: Sky Pirates! [+]Dave Stone, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) with Ace saying he made "great omelettes". (AUDIO: The Fearmonger [+]Jonathan Blum, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2000).) He also knew how to make sofrit pages and could mix a good sangria, (AUDIO: The Rapture [+]Joseph Lidster|Joseph Lidster]], Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2002).) and make scrambled eggs (PROSE: Strange England [+]Simon Messingham, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) and a cappuccino. (PROSE: Bad Therapy [+]Matthew Jones, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).)

Claiming to be "fluent in everything", (PROSE: Timewyrm: Exodus [+]Terrance Dicks, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1991).) the Doctor could speak the ancient dialect of the Japanese royal family, (PROSE: Transit [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992).) read the writing of the Silurians, (PROSE: White Darkness [+]David A. McIntee, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) swear in Old Low Gallifreyan, (PROSE: Blood Harvest [+]Terrance Dicks, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) knew sign language, (PROSE: SLEEPY [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) and could use his eyebrows to communicate with Benny. (PROSE: The Trials of Tara [+]Paul Cornell, Decalog 2: Lost Property (Virgin Decalogs, 1995).) He could also perfectly mimic the local fauna of his surroundings, (TV: Silver Nemesis [+]Kevin Clarke, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1 and TVNZ, 1988).) such as a lion's roar. (PROSE: Iceberg [+]David Banks, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).)

Without the aid of the TARDIS's translation circuit, he could speak Welsh (TV: Delta and the Bannermen [+]Malcolm Kohll, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) Russian, (TV: The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) German, (PROSE: Timewyrm: Exodus [+]Terrance Dicks, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1991).) Tewa, (PROSE: Lucifer Rising [+]Jim Mortimore and Andy Lane, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) French, (PROSE: Set Piece [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) Berberese, (PROSE: Original Sin [+]Andy Lane, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) ancient Betelgeusian, (PROSE: The Death of Art [+]Simon Bucher-Jones, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) plain Anglo-Saxon, (PROSE: Damaged Goods [+]Russell T Davies, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) and Draconian. (PROSE: Monitor [+]Huw Wilkins, Short Trips: Steel Skies (Short Trips, 2003).)

The Doctor could levitate off the ground whilst in meditation, (PROSE: Lucifer Rising [+]Jim Mortimore and Andy Lane, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) deliberately lower his intelligence, (PROSE: Parasite [+]Jim Mortimore, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) and sculpture a sandcastle in the shape of the Great City of the Exxilons. (PROSE: Storm Harvest [+]Robert Perry and Mike Tucker, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1999).) While he could forget names, the Doctor never forgot what someone looked like. (AUDIO: Project Lazarus [+]Cavan Scott and Mark Wright, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2003).)

Appearance[]

This section's awfully stubby.

Info about the Doctor's physical appearance and facial features needs to be added

The Seventh Doctor was a short man, who initially appeared to be in his mid-forties, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) with his human counterpart being able to pull off being 48-years-old. (PROSE: Human Nature [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) By the end of his life, however, the Doctor had aged significantly. (TV: Doctor Who [+]Matthew Jacobs, Doctor Who Television Movie (Fox Broadcasting Company, 1996).) He was ambidextrous, (PROSE: Warlock [+]Andrew Cartmel, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) and had a small tattoo. (PROSE: Return of the Living Dad [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).)

With an animated face, the Doctor had expressive bulgy eyebrows, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) and, according to Ace, three distinctive smiles: his "cartoon grin", his "secret freak-the-enemy-smile" and his "halfway smile", the last of which unnerved Ace. (PROSE: Love and War [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992).)

Though his eyes were naturally blue, (PROSE: Set Piece [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) they would often change colour, (PROSE: Timewyrm: Revelation [+]Paul Cornell, adapted from Total Eclipse, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1991).) appearing as grey, (PROSE: Timewyrm: Exodus [+]Terrance Dicks, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1991).) green, (PROSE: Timewyrm: Revelation [+]Paul Cornell, adapted from Total Eclipse, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1991).) brown, (PROSE: Transit [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1992).) black, (PROSE: Legacy [+]Gary Russell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) and a mix of blue and grey. (PROSE: Toy Soldiers [+]Paul Leonard, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).)

Despite the fact his body could heal at an accelerated rate, (PROSE: Special Weapons [+]Paul Leonard, More Short Trips (Short Trips short stories, 1999).) the Doctor acquired a number of scars on his person, (PROSE: Return of the Living Dad [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) from the removal of Ship's flower, (PROSE: Set Piece [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) a bullet shattering one of his hearts, (PROSE: Parasite [+]Jim Mortimore, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) and Ace stabbing his left shoulder, (PROSE: The Left-Handed Hummingbird [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) with the Doctor occasionally feeling pain emanating from the wound. (PROSE: Set Piece [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995)., Infinite Requiem [+]Daniel Blythe, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995)., Return of the Living Dad [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).)

Ace thought that in his "get-up", the Seventh Doctor resembled a "dance-hall comic". (PROSE: Fable Fusion [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) Peri Brown described him as a "goofy little guy in a weird pullover", (AUDIO: The Veiled Leopard [+]Iain McLaughlin and Claire Bartlett, Big Finish DWM originals (Big Finish Productions, 2006).) and Josiah W. Dogbolter also considered him a "pipsqueak". (COMIC: Time Bomb! [+]Steve Parkhouse, Stories in Death's Head (1988) using characters that originated in the DWU (Marvel UK, 1989).) Adrienne Kramer described the Seventh Doctor as being a "short and dark-haired [man], [looking] somewhere in his forties, [and] with a Scottish accent." (PROSE: Vampire Science [+]Kate Orman and Jonathan Blum, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).)

The First Doctor described his seventh incarnation as the "short Scottish fellow" who would "turn things to his own ends". (PROSE: Five Card Draw [+]Todd Green, Short Trips: Zodiac (Short Trips, 2002).)

Hair and grooming[]

While he had a full set of brown hair after his regeneration, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) the Doctor allowed his greying hair to grow out into tufts on the sides of his head, while it thinned a bit at the top of his scalp, by the end of his life. (TV: Doctor Who [+]Matthew Jacobs, Doctor Who Television Movie (Fox Broadcasting Company, 1996).)

Clothing[]

Main attires[]

Seven like a boss

The Doctor's first outfit. (TV: The Greatest Show in the Galaxy [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988-1989).)

After many failed attempts to find a new look, the Seventh Doctor eventually settled on a single breasted ivory safari-styled jacket with a red paisley handkerchief in his left pocket, a Clan Wallace tartan scarf under his lapels, with a beige pullover adorned with cherry question marks and turquoise zigzag patterns, with grey-brown tweed plaid trousers and a pair of burgundy braces either pulled over (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) or tucked under the pullover. (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) Under the pullover, he wore a white shirt with a scarlet paisley necktie, and completed his outfit with a pair of two-tone white and brown brogued spectator shoes. He also had a chained fob watch attached to his left lapel, while the watch itself rested in his upper left breast pocket, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) that could function as a gadget to aid in his adventures. (TV: Silver Nemesis [+]Kevin Clarke, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1 and TVNZ, 1988)., Survival [+]Rona Munro, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) After losing his tartan scarf during his clash with the First Rani, (PROSE: The Useful Pile [+]Kate Orman, Brief Encounter (1992).) he replaced it with a crimson paisley one. (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) He wore either matching polka-dot socks (COMIC: Time and Tide [+]Richard Alan and John Carnell, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1989).) or one navy blue sock and one Rocky and Bullwinkle sock. (PROSE: Return of the Living Dad [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).)

SeventhBrigBessie

The Doctor's second outfit. (TV: Battlefield|)

As he matured into more of a schemer, the Doctor began wearing a chocolate brown jacket, and changed his hatband, handkerchief and necktie to ones in more subdued shades of burgundy (TV: Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) and brown. (TV: Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) Occasionally, he would remove his pullover as well, (COMIC: Distractions [+]Dan Abnett, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1990)., The Mark of Mandragora [+]Dan Abnett, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1990-1991)., Party Animals [+]Gary Russell, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1991).) and would wear a tan brown duffle coat when caught in the rain. (TV: The Curse of Fenric [+]Ian Briggs, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).; PROSE: Untitled [+]Paul Ferry, Brief Encounter (1992)., The Highest Science [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).)

During his escapades as Time's Champion, the Doctor replaced his usual attire with a wrinkled cream-coloured linen suit, with a glistening silk shirt worn with a green silk cravat, and a paisley banded white fedora (PROSE: White Darkness [+]David A. McIntee, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) that he had had made especially for him. (PROSE: First Frontier [+]David A. McIntee, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) Worn on his lapel would be either Cameca's brooch, (PROSE: White Darkness [+]David A. McIntee, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).) or a Smiley Face pin badge. (PROSE: Sky Pirates! [+]Dave Stone, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) He would later replace his cravat for four-in-hand ties coloured in rust orange, (PROSE: Legacy [+]Gary Russell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) ruby, (PROSE: Sky Pirates! [+]Dave Stone, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) sapphire blue, (PROSE: All-Consuming Fire [+]Andy Lane, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) lime green, (PROSE: Tragedy Day [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) Prussian blue paisley, (PROSE: Strange England [+]Simon Messingham, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) or solid red. (PROSE: Original Sin [+]Andy Lane, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).)

Seven Armchair

The Doctor's final outfit. (TV: Doctor Who [+]Matthew Jacobs, Doctor Who Television Movie (Fox Broadcasting Company, 1996).)

After his confrontation with the Brotherhood of the Immanent Flesh, (PROSE: So Vile a Sin [+]Ben Aaronovitch and Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).) the Doctor began wearing a peanut brown tweed jacket, with a scarlet brocade waistcoat, an ivory shirt, green plaid trousers and a black and brown zigzag patterned tie. (TV: Doctor Who [+]Matthew Jacobs, Doctor Who Television Movie (Fox Broadcasting Company, 1996).)

On his head, the Doctor wore battered cream colonial-styled Panama hat with an identical paisley handkerchief folded into a hatband and an upturned brim. (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) He later replaced his battered hat with a newer one. (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).) He also wore a black Tank-styled wristwatch on his right wrist, (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) which he later replaced with a sportier round watch, (TV: Silver Nemesis [+]Kevin Clarke, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1 and TVNZ, 1988).) and then with a rectangular faced tank watch. (TV: Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).)

After finding his old signet ring in the TARDIS console, (COMIC: The Chameleon Factor [+]Paul Cornell, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1991).) the Doctor started wearing it again through numerous adventures, (COMIC: The Good Soldier [+]Andrew Cartmel, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1991)., Metamorphosis [+]Paul Cornell, Doctor Who Yearbook comic stories (Marvel Comics, 1992).) until he gave it to Joan Redfern. (PROSE: Human Nature [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).)

Other clothes[]

This section's awfully stubby.

Info about the Doctor's attire from Search Out Space, Nightshade, Shadowmind, Birthright, Bad Therapy, Atom Bomb Blues, The Magic Mousetrap, Mask of Tragedy, and We Are The Daleks need to be added

Whilst in Nazi Germany, the Doctor briefly donned a black leather trenchcoat and a black soft hat. (PROSE: Timewyrm: Exodus [+]Terrance Dicks, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1991).)

During his time in Chicago in 1929, the Doctor donned a grey striped suit and fedora. (PROSE: Blood Harvest [+]Terrance Dicks, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).)

Whilst visiting Betrushia, the Doctor wore an orange waistcoat, a white shirt with a Gladstone collar and a black cravat with his dark jacket. (PROSE: St Anthony's Fire [+]Mark Gatiss, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).)

On Youkali, the Doctor wore a burgundy waistcoat and a tweed jacket. (PROSE: Return of the Living Dad [+]Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).)

Umbrellas[]

After his regeneration stabilised, the Doctor took to carrying around an umbrella as part of his day-to-day outfit, using them as physical props, usually to disarm and trip opponents, (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987)., Battlefield [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., Ghost Light [+]Marc Platt, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989)., Survival [+]Rona Munro, Doctor Who season 26 (BBC1, 1989).) as well as using them as grappling hooks, (TV: Dragonfire [+]Ian Briggs, adapted from Seventh Doctor Audition Tapes (Andrew Cartmel), Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) and as measuring rods. (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Ben Aaronovitch, Doctor Who season 25 (BBC1, 1988).)

He initially carried his previous incarnation's rainbow umbrella, but was forced to leave it in the First Rani's base on Lakertya, where it was destroyed. (TV: Time and the Rani [+]Pip & Jane Baker, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) During a clear out, he found a replacement within the TARDIS wardrobe: (PROSE: The Useful Pile [+]Kate Orman, Brief Encounter (1992).) a black umbrella with a whangee handle. (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Stephen Wyatt, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).)

After his black umbrella was damaged, (AUDIO: The Warehouse [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) the Doctor acquired a new umbrella with an elaborate handle in the shape of a large, cherry coloured question mark. (TV: Delta and the Bannermen [+]Malcolm Kohll, Doctor Who season 24 (BBC1, 1987).) The handle could split in half and unfold into a makeshift stool, (COMIC: Planet of the Dead [+]John Freeman, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1988).) could fire a small gold pellet that contained a hallucinogenic truth drug, (PROSE: Atom Bomb Blues [+]Andrew Cartmel, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2005).) and was also detachable, hiding a secret compartment containing a vial of Time Lord restorative. (COMIC: The Forgotten [+]Tony Lee, IDW mini-series and one-shots (IDW Publishing, 2008-2009).)

Attempting to "wean himself off" his umbrella, the Doctor took to carrying a walking-cane as his reign as Time's Champion drew to an end. (PROSE: Christmas on a Rational Planet [+]Lawrence Miles, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).)

Behind the scenes[]

Information from invalid sources[]

7andPeri

An illustration of the Seventh Doctor and Peri Brown which appeared in A Cold Day in Hell! [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW..

In COMIC: A Cold Day in Hell! [+]Simon Furman, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1987-1988)., the Seventh Doctor is shown to be travelling with Frobisher, a companion of the Sixth Doctor, and Frobisher refers to Peri Brown as if she had recently left. The timeline given in the Doctor Who Magazine article Stripped for action? claims that the Seventh Doctor had picked up Peri and Frobisher to travel with him until Peri left to live with Yrcanos.

Casting[]

In popular culture[]

  • After the original series ended, Sylvester McCoy and Sophie Aldred played characters called the Professor and Ace, respectively, in the Audio Adventures in Time & Space audio series produced by BBV Productions. The stories were initially implied to be a continuation of Doctor Who, but these connections decreased when the Professor was renamed the Dominie and Aldred's character Alice.
  • In the BBC medical soap opera Doctors, McCoy guest-starred as Graham Capelli, an actor who had played the titular role in The Amazing Lollipop Man, a cult 1980s children's television series. The character of the Lollipop Man had many similarities to the Doctor.
  • An Easter Egg referencing the Seventh Doctor appears in the seventh episode of the first season of the Nickelodeon children's horror series, Are You Afraid of the Dark? , "The Tale of the Captured Souls" , in which the Seventh Doctor's hat and coat can be seen hanging from a hatstand at two points in the episode.

The Cartmel Masterplan[]

Season 25 and 26 had broad hints that the Doctor was not simply a Time Lord, as previously shown and stated. This overarching plot, conceived by Script Editor Andrew Cartmel and referred to by fans as the Cartmel Masterplan, was designed to restore an element of mystery in the Doctor and his true nature as in the stories of the first and second incarnations. Although the cancellation of the series at the end of Season 26 prevented further on-screen exploration of this arc, it was later given full rein in the Virgin New Adventures novel series.

External links[]

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