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Feeling a moral obligation to help the oppressed to fight the injustices he came across in the universe, the Second Doctor was a maverick gadfly that hid his more cunning aspects behind his outwardly warm and bumbling nature as he tried to catch his adversaries out in their schemes, not showing his hand until he held the advantage. However, while he would always answer a cry for help, the Doctor held a preference to enjoying himself in his travels, simply looking to have fun as he journeyed through time and space.

Biography[]

Main article: Second Doctor/Biography

After emerging from being renewed, (TV: The Tenth Planet [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).) the Doctor had some initial difficulty adjusting to the change, though he still had his previous incarnation's last companions, Ben Jackson and Polly Wright, at his side to help him. (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).) They were soon joined by mid-18th century Highland Scot Jamie McCrimmon, with whom the Doctor developed a strong friendship. (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967).) After Ben and Polly left the TARDIS to return to 1966, (TV: The Faceless Ones [+]David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) the Doctor and Jamie were embroiled in a plot that saw the Daleks come to their supposed "final end", and ended with them being joined by Victoria Waterfield, a young girl orphaned by the Daleks. (TV: The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) With Jamie and Victoria by his side, the Doctor came into further conflicts with the Cybermen, (TV: The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967).) and also had his first battles with enemies such as the Great Intelligence and the Ice Warriors, (TV: The Abominable Snowmen [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Ice Warriors [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967).) though also made a friend in Colonel Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart. (TV: The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) Eventually, Victoria was unable to cope with the constant distress, and took the opportunity to settle down with a new family in 1975. (TV: Fury from the Deep [+]Victor Pemberton, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).)

Jamie would also part ways with the Doctor to stay in 1967 Scotland, (COMIC: Invasion of the Quarks [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1968).) with the Doctor somehow being reunited with his grandchildren, John and Giliian, for more adventures, (COMIC: The Extortioner [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1966-1967).) until he was convinced to leave them at Zebadee University to protect them from the threat of the Quarks, with the subsequent battle reuniting him with Jamie, who returned to the TARDIS. (COMIC: Invasion of the Quarks [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1968).)

The Doctor and Jamie then made a new friend in Zoe Heriot, a young scientist from the late 21st century who had stowed aboard the TARDIS after helping them defend the Wheel from the Cybermen. (TV: The Wheel in Space [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) The three travellers would endure battles in the Land of Fiction (TV: The Mind Robber [+]Peter Ling, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) and join with UNIT and the newly promoted Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart to fight a Cyberman invasion, (TV: The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) until their travels came to an end when the Doctor had to call on the Time Lords for help with the evil machinations of the War Lords. Though the Time Lords did indeed render assistance, they also condemned him to exile on Earth and a forced regeneration for breaking their non-interference policy many times over, and returned Jamie and Zoe to their homes with their memories of their adventures erased. (TV: The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).)

However, the Doctor was granted some leniency in his sentence by agreeing to work for the Celestial Intervention Agency, carrying out covert operations for them, with Jamie being recruited to assist the Doctor for some of them. (PROSE: World Game [+]Terrance Dicks, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2005).) However, the Doctor could not keep his fate at bay forever, (PROSE: A Brief History of Time Lords [+]Steve Tribe, BBC Books (2017).) and, though he was able to escape into exile in 1960s London, (COMIC: Action in Exile [+]TVC comic stories (1969).) the Time Lords eventually entrapped him with animated scarecrows and the Doctor was indeed forced to regenerate into his third body. (COMIC: The Night Walkers [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (Polystyle Publications and Ltd., 1969).)

Psychological profile[]

Personality[]

Thought Channel

The Doctor defends his interference in time. (TV: The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).)

Striving to be the "nicest possible person", (TV: The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968).) the Second Doctor enjoyed embroiling himself in dangerous adventures that provided the "spice of life", (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967)., Fury from the Deep [+]Victor Pemberton, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) to the extent that he envied those in more perilous situations than himself. (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) He privately hoped to find "pre-historic monsters" when thinking about where the TARDIS could land. (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) He could be assertive in where he went, believing he was "allowed everywhere". (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) However, he would not turn down the chance for relaxation when it presented itself, (TV: The Macra Terror [+]Ian Stuart Black, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., Fury from the Deep [+]Victor Pemberton, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) and would be upset when his rest was interrupted. (TV: The Wheel in Space [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).)

As he "never talk[ed] nonsense", (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).) the Second Doctor frequently gave the impression that he was a bumbling fool who never knew what he was doing, or what he was doing was part of a larger scheme, as a calculated act to fool those into underestimating his true intellect, (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) as he surmised that "an unintelligent enemy [was] far less dangerous than an intelligent one". (TV: The Dominators [+]Norman Ashby, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) Despite the Doctor's almost childlike recklessness, it was always clear to his allies that a keen, deliberate intellect lurked behind his every action, (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967).) with the Doctor adopting a grave seriousness when the situation called for it. (TV: The Moonbase [+]Kit Pedler, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968)., The Seeds of Death [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) He enjoyed keeping people in the dark on how much control he had over a situation, (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966)., The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967).) as he enjoyed being "mysterious", (TV: The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968).) though he would deflect blame to others when his discrepancies backfired on him. (TV: The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).)

Despite his tendency to panic when events got out of control, (TV: The Abominable Snowmen [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969).) the Second Doctor always acted heroically and morally in his desire to help the oppressed fight "the most terrible things [in the universe]", (TV: The Moonbase [+]Kit Pedler, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) often being the first to jump to the rescue when someone needed saving, (TV: Fury from the Deep [+]Victor Pemberton, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) and deeming himself the "enemy of anything that [was] wrong or evil in [the] universe". (PROSE: The Final Sanction [+]Steve Lyons, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1999).) He was even willingly to sacrifice his safety and freedoms to prevent his friends from undergoing preventable suffering. (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The Two Doctors [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 22 (BBC1, 1985).) However, he refused to act when he did not know the allegiances of the side he was working with, demanding they backed up their intentions with tangible evidence. (TV: The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968).)

The Doctor championed free will and the right for people to remain non-stagnant and "always make up [their] own mind", even if it meant questioning authority, (TV: The Macra Terror [+]Ian Stuart Black, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Mind Robber [+]Peter Ling, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) though was adamant that such things had to come naturally instead of from augmentation from outside forces. (TV: The Two Doctors [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 22 (BBC1, 1985).) He himself would refuse to be treated as a slave, (TV: The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) and would only cooperate if he was addressed "properly". (TV: The Ice Warriors [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967).)

He also had a warmer, gentler way about him than his previous incarnation, taking time during his adventures to check if his friends were feeling alright and comfort them when they were frightened, (TV: The Moonbase [+]Kit Pedler, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Faceless Ones [+]David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., Fury from the Deep [+]Victor Pemberton, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) keeping their wellbeing first and foremost in his mind, even when he got caught up in events around him, (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Abominable Snowmen [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967).) prioritising their safety before his own. (TV: The Faceless Ones [+]David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Abominable Snowmen [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).)

He was easily distracted, (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966)., The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) and would talk to himself to think, treating his inner thoughts as a separate person while in conversation. (TV: The Moonbase [+]Kit Pedler, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).)

He was very aware of his own genius, (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Seeds of Death [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983)., The Two Doctors [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 22 (BBC1, 1985).) and would react with indignity if he felt his brilliance was being questioned, (TV: The Moonbase [+]Kit Pedler, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Ice Warriors [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Two Doctors [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 22 (BBC1, 1985).) but was able to admit when he had been a "silly idiot" (TV: The Space Pirates [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) and when he was at fault for a situation getting out of hand due to his own miscalculations. (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) However, he was adamant on solving a problem with the solution that he had come up with. (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).)

While he would normally leave discreetly without a goodbye when he had solved the problem at hand, (TV: The Moonbase [+]Kit Pedler, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Ice Warriors [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969)., The Seeds of Death [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) the Second Doctor was quite willing to enjoy fame, and even fortune, when he could find it. (COMIC: Martha the Mechanical Housemaid [+]TVC comic stories (1969).) Other times, however, he just accepted a simple "thank you" as reward for his heroic actions. (TV: Fury from the Deep [+]Victor Pemberton, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).)

He enjoyed saying tongue twisters, (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).) drawing, marbles, (TV: The Space Pirates [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) books, and receiving gifts. (PROSE: The Nameless City [+]Michael Scott, Puffin eshort (Puffin Books, 2013).) He was also fond of Cluedo, (PROSE: The Menagerie [+]Martin Day, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) and had a fascination for jungles. (PROSE: Combat Rock [+]Mick Lewis, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2002).)

He disliked being a leader, (TV: The Macra Terror [+]Ian Stuart Black, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) and goodbyes. (TV: The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969).) He also "never like[d] to make predictions" about seeing the last of something, (TV: The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967).) and bemoaned that humans were always "trying to destroy each other." (TV: The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968).)

While New York City was his favourite city, (COMIC: The Monsters from the Past [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1967).) the Doctor always fond it "marvelous" to visit London. (COMIC: Death Race [+]TV Comic Annual stories (1969).)

The Second Doctor liked to consume fruit, (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).) plankton, (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) wine, (TV: The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) pork, potatoes, carrots, ice cream, (TV: The Wheel in Space [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) patty cakes, (TV: The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) roast duck, (COMIC: Action in Exile [+]TVC comic stories (1969).) champagne cognac, (PROSE: Foreign Devils [+]Andrew Cartmel, Telos Doctor Who novellas (Telos Publishing, 2002).) and cheesecake. (PROSE: The Juror's Story [+]Eddie Robson, Short Trips: Repercussions (Short Trips, 2004).)

Having a liking for the dark, (TV: The Macra Terror [+]Ian Stuart Black, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) but a fear of the unknown, (TV: The Mind Robber [+]Peter Ling, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) the Doctor "live[d] in [the] hope" that he would always survive his dangerous escapades, (TV: The Ice Warriors [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967).) trying his best to avoid pessimism (TV: The Space Pirates [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) or see "danger in [his] own shadow", (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) believing that the "universe tend[ed] towards good" (PROSE: Wonderland [+]Mark Chadbourn, Telos Doctor Who novellas (Telos Publishing, 2003).) and that there was "no such thing as defeat", (COMIC: The Tests of Trefus [+]The Dr Who Annual 1968 (Doctor Who annual, 1967).) though he knew when to abandon a hopeless course. (COMIC: Atoms Infinite [+]The Dr Who Annual 1969 (Doctor Who annual, 1968).) He held the greatest virtues in a person as being "courage, pity, chivalry, friendship, [and] even compassion", (TV: The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) and thought that intelligent beings should not be used as slaves. (COMIC: The Tests of Trefus [+]The Dr Who Annual 1968 (Doctor Who annual, 1967).)

Having a disdain for bureaucracy, (TV: The Faceless Ones [+]David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) the Doctor believed it was justified to break the "bad" laws, (TV: The Macra Terror [+]Ian Stuart Black, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) especially the laws that actively encouraged letting people suffer. (TV: The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) He believed that "life depend[ed] on change and renewal," (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).) and that one should prioritise "a modern scientific brain" instead of favouring "heathen idol[s]", (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) but he did respect how other cultures valued their beliefs. (TV: The Moonbase [+]Kit Pedler, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) When Ben and Polly suggested taking some jewels from the tomb of Pharaoh Tut-Ankh-Amen, the Doctor was aghast and berated them for wanting to steal from the deceased, calling it a "monstrous notion". (PROSE: The King of Golden Death [+]The Dr Who Annual 1968 (Doctor Who annual, 1967).)

The Second Doctor believed in destiny, telling Ben and Polly that the TARDIS' seemingly random journeys were controlled by destiny and that, "if [they] just obey[ed] destiny blindly, all [would] be well". (PROSE: Only a Matter of Time [+]The Dr Who Annual 1968 (Doctor Who annual, 1967).) He also believed that logic "merely enable[d] one to be wrong with authority." (TV: The Wheel in Space [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) He did not, however, believe in luck, (COMIC: The Forgotten [+]Tony Lee, IDW mini-series and one-shots (IDW Publishing, 2008-2009).) or yetis. (PROSE: Dr. Second [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

The "enemy [he] fear[ed] most" were the Cybermen, (COMIC: The Coming of the Cybermen [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1967).) and he was also frightened of vampires. (PROSE: The Murder Game [+]Steve Lyons, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).)

SecondStern

A more serious side of the Doctor. (TV: The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969).)

While he "never held that the end[s] [justified] the means", (TV: The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) the Second Doctor was aware that there were times that risking the lives of a few people was necessary to protect everyone else, (TV: The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Ice Warriors [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Wheel in Space [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) or to at least allow "a little injustice" to prevent a "wholesale slaughter", (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).) though he did not like having such a philosophy. (TV:The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968).)

In his more ruthless moments, the Doctor wired the Cyber-Tombs' doors to fatally electrocute anyone trying to open them, (TV: The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967).) pursued the Kraals into extinction, (COMIC: Freedom by Fire [+]The Dr Who Annual 1969 (Doctor Who annual, 1968).) ensured that a relatively helpless party of Daleks would all die, (COMIC: Bringer of Darkness [+]Warwick Gray, DWMS comic stories (Marvel Comics, 1993).) steered an Ice Warrior fleet into the sun, (TV: The Seeds of Death [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) and used a ray gun he had invented to kill a giant spider while shouting, "Die, hideous creature... Die!" (COMIC: Master of Spiders [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1967).) He also appeared unfazed to Ramón Salamander's fate in the Time Vortex. (TV: The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) However, when he was about to take a risk, he would warn others to leave if they felt unsafe. (TV: The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967).)

While he "care[d] about life", (TV: The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) the Doctor knew that there were situations with "no time for mercy" (COMIC: The Coming of the Cybermen [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1967).) and was unafraid to resort to violence by brutalising a person if it was beneficial to his plans, (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967).) nor did he fear launching himself at an unaware opponent to stop their evil plans, (COMIC: Space War Two [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1967)., Operation Wurlitzer [+]TVC comic stories (1969)., Action in Exile [+]TVC comic stories (1969).) and was even ready to arm himself with a knife if he believed it was the best way to defend himself. (TV: The Two Doctors [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 22 (BBC1, 1985).) However, he saw crests that glorified combat as "romantic piffle", (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967).) and would seek all forms of justice that were not personal executions, as he did not believe anyone had the right to kill. (TV: The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968).) Indeed, he would regret it if he himself killed someone when trying to only incapacitate them. (PROSE: A Comedy of Terrors [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

He also claimed to hate computers, (TV: The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) and would only use them when he had no alternative. (TV: The Ice Warriors [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967).) He similarly dismissed robots as machines "built to obey", (COMIC: Robot King [+]The Dr Who Annual 1970 (Doctor Who annual, 1969).) as he considered machines to be a preferable form of slavery. (COMIC: The Tests of Trefus [+]The Dr Who Annual 1968 (Doctor Who annual, 1967).)

While the Second Doctor preached in keeping the stability of the Space-Time continuum intact, (TV: The Two Doctors [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 22 (BBC1, 1985).) he was willing to indulge in "bending [the Laws of Time] a little" when he could. (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

Not above playing mind games with his enemies, the Doctor would pretend to agree with them to allow their egos to expose their madness, (TV: The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967).) or would purposely annoy them to trick them into showing their lack of self-control. (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).)

The Second Doctor had a noticeably antagonistic relationship with the Third Doctor, their personalities so different that they seemed incapable of working together without the authoritative presence of the First Doctor, (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) whom the Second Doctor was slightly afraid of. (WC: Doctors Assemble! [+]James Goss, Doctor Who: Lockdown! (2020).) While combating Adam Mitchell's Autons, the Second Doctor associated himself with his first and seventh incarnations, combining with them to think of a solution to the situation. (COMIC: Endgame [+]Scott & David Tipton, Prisoners of Time (IDW Publishing, 2013).)

While the Sixth Doctor considered his second incarnation to be an "antediluvian fogey" for apparently being captured by the Sontarans, (TV: The Two Doctors [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 22 (BBC1, 1985).) the Eighth Doctor remembered the Second Doctor as a "gentle little fellow who had sacrificed his own freedom so that others might be free". (PROSE: The Eight Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).)

The Second Doctor was highly defensive of his TARDIS, (TV: The Moonbase [+]Kit Pedler, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) thinking it as the "most valuable thing in the world" (COMIC: Egyptian Escapade [+]TVC comic stories (1967).) and describing it as "a magnificent machine" and "utterly reliable", trusting it would bring him to where his help was needed. (PROSE: Dr. Second [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

By the time he fought Side, the Doctor considered Jamie to be the most reliable friend that he had ever had. (AUDIO: The Jigsaw War [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) The Sixth Doctor even told his companion, Peri Brown, that he was "always very fond of Jamie." When Chessene of the Franzine Grig informed him that Jamie had most likely been killed in a Sontaran attack, the Doctor began going into a grief-stricken rage until he was restrained. (TV: The Two Doctors [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 22 (BBC1, 1985).)

Wanting to have his revenge on them, (COMIC: The Doctor Strikes Back [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1967).) the Doctor saw the Daleks as nothing more than "a living plague of hatred and fear", and felt justified in destroying them, with Victoria unsettled by how his voice "[carried] such hatred" as he spoke of them. (COMIC: Bringer of Darkness [+]Warwick Gray, DWMS comic stories (Marvel Comics, 1993).) He even took glee in tricking the Daleks into destroying each other. (COMIC: The Doctor Strikes Back [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1967).)

Samantha Briggs believed the Second Doctor was a "weirdy", though Jamie McCrimmon defended his intelligence, (TV: The Faceless Ones [+]David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) with the Brigadier recognising that the Doctor had "an incredible knack of being one jump ahead of everyone." (TV: The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) Victoria Waterfield saw the Second Doctor as a beacon of "kindness, compassion, wisdom, [and] great knowledge", (AUDIO: Power Play [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) with Zoe Heriot considering the Doctor to be a "lovely little man" who was "fun to be with" (PROSE: One Small Step... [+]Nicholas Briggs, Short Trips: Past Tense (Short Trips, 2004).) as he was "old, clever and kind." (AUDIO: The Five Dimensional Man [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

The Tremas Master described the Second Doctor as "the comedian", but noted he was "not quite the clown he look[ed]". (GAME: Destiny of the Doctors [+]Hannah Redler, Gary Russell, Terrance Dicks and Andy Russell, BBC Multimedia (1997).) River Song found the Second Doctor "fun, but [she] wouldn't trust him as far as [she] could throw him". (GAME: The Eternity Clock [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) When the Eighth Doctor had a tarot card reading, the Second Doctor was identified as "the Hermit". (PROSE: The City of the Dead [+]Lloyd Rose, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2001).)

When sentenced to a forced regeneration by the Time Lords, the Doctor’s initial concern was his next incarnation's appearance, though he rejected the faces offered to him, maintaining that he alone had the right to decide what he looked like. Once the Time Lords decided to start to begin the regeneration, however, the Doctor quickly protested how unfairly he was being treated, and continued protesting in the void, (TV: The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) until the Celestial Intervention Agency intervened. (PROSE: World Game [+]Terrance Dicks, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2005).) When the regeneration was finally triggered after he was shot by the Time Lords' animated scarecrows, the Doctor used his dying breath to reassure Farmer Glenlock-Hogan, who had been ridiculed for seeing his scarecrows come to life, that the phenomenon would not happen again after the night was over. (COMIC: The Night Walkers [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (Polystyle Publications and Ltd., 1969).) As he entered his final moments, the Second Doctor thought of his companions, and, though afraid, felt excitement by the feeling of renewal, as he continued to feel justified by his violation of the non-interference policy. (PROSE: Timewyrm: Apocalypse [+]Nigel Robinson, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1991).)

Habits and quirks[]

The Second Doctor developed a habit of running away from danger when inappropriately prepared, often instructing his companions to retreat with a variation of "when I say run, run." (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966)., The Faceless Ones [+]David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Abominable Snowmen [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967).) When directing people or instructing them to follow him, it was rare for the Doctor not to issue the instruction with an utterance of, "come along". (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Seeds of Death [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The Space Pirates [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

He also began many of his phrases with an, "oh", such as "Oh, dear", (TV: The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Wheel in Space [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Dominators [+]Norman Ashby, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Mind Robber [+]Peter Ling, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Space Pirates [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) "Oh, my giddy aunt!", (TV: The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., The Two Doctors [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 22 (BBC1, 1985).) and retorting with, "oh, no, no, no", when he disagreed with a statement. (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966)., The Moonbase [+]Kit Pedler, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Dominators [+]Norman Ashby, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Space Pirates [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).)

He was prone to exclaiming, "Oh, my word!", when startled, (TV: The Ice Warriors [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., Fury from the Deep [+]Victor Pemberton, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Dominators [+]Norman Ashby, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) analysing, (TV: The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Space Pirates [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) alleviated, (TV: The Dominators [+]Norman Ashby, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Seeds of Death [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) amazed, (TV: The Mind Robber [+]Peter Ling, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Seeds of Death [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) intrigued, (TV: The Mind Robber [+]Peter Ling, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) baffled, (TV: The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Space Pirates [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., The Two Doctors [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 22 (BBC1, 1985).) or annoyed. (TV: The Seeds of Death [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) Another favoured exclamation of his was, "Ah ha", which he would say in moments of gleeful realisation or when celebrating a positive outcome. (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966)., The Abominable Snowmen [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Dominators [+]Norman Ashby, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).)

He was also inclined to say, "I wonder...", when he was thinking aloud, (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967)., The Abominable Snowmen [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968)., The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., Fury from the Deep [+]Victor Pemberton, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Wheel in Space [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Dominators [+]Norman Ashby, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Mind Robber [+]Peter Ling, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969)., The Space Pirates [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) asking for help, (TV: The Faceless Ones [+]David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., Fury from the Deep [+]Victor Pemberton, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) or stating his disbelief in a statement, (TV: The Wheel in Space [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) and would shush people when he wanted them to be quiet. (TV: The Abominable Snowmen [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Wheel in Space [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Dominators [+]Norman Ashby, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Mind Robber [+]Peter Ling, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969)., The Seeds of Death [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The Space Pirates [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).)

Other favoured phrases of his to yell in surprise were, "Great powers", (COMIC: The Monsters from the Past [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1967)., The Faithful Rocket Pack [+]TVC comic stories (1967)., The Witches [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1967-1968)., Attack of the Daleks [+]TV Comic Annual stories (1968)., Dr. Who and the Space Pirates [+]TVC comic stories (1968)., Masquerade [+]TV Comic Holiday Special stories (1968)., Invasion of the Quarks [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1968)., Ice Cap Terror [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1968)., The Electrodes [+]TV Comic Annual stories (1969)., Father Time [+]TVC comic stories (1969)., The Duellists [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (Polystyle, 1969)., Eskimo Joe [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1969)., Peril at 60 Fathoms [+]TVC comic stories (1969)., Test Flight [+]TV Comic Annual stories (1969)., The Entertainer [+]TV Comic Holiday Special stories (1969)., Action in Exile [+]TVC comic stories (1969).) and, "By the planets!". (COMIC: The Coming of the Cybermen [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1967)., The Faithful Rocket Pack [+]TVC comic stories (1967)., The Witches [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1967-1968)., Cyber-Mole [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1968)., The Sabre-Toothed Gorillas [+]TVC comic stories (1968)., The Jokers [+]TVC comic stories (1968)., Jungle of Doom [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1968)., The Time Museum [+]TV Comic Annual stories (1969)., Peril at 60 Fathoms [+]TVC comic stories (1969).)

Second Doctor Hat

The Doctor exclamates his point. (COMIC: Pursued by the Trods [+]TV Comic Annual stories (1968).)

A fidgety incarnation, it was rare for the Second Doctor to go long without continuously wringing and interlocking his hands together. (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966)., The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967)., The Space Pirates [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) However, he was known to stand with his hands simply crossed in front of him, (TV: The Macra Terror [+]Ian Stuart Black, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Abominable Snowmen [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Ice Warriors [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Mind Robber [+]Peter Ling, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Seeds of Death [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) and occasionally held behind his back. (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

He was also known to stand with his hands on hips, (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966)., The Moonbase [+]Kit Pedler, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Faceless Ones [+]David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Ice Warriors [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Wheel in Space [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Dominators [+]Norman Ashby, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Mind Robber [+]Peter Ling, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) dither his hands in front of his lapels, (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Macra Terror [+]Ian Stuart Black, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Faceless Ones [+]David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Abominable Snowmen [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Mind Robber [+]Peter Ling, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Seeds of Death [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) and twiddle his fingers in his hand. (TV: The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Ice Warriors [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968)., The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Dominators [+]Norman Ashby, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

When in contemplation, the Doctor would scratch his chin or mouth, (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966)., The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Moonbase [+]Kit Pedler, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Faceless Ones [+]David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Abominable Snowmen [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Ice Warriors [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Dominators [+]Norman Ashby, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Mind Robber [+]Peter Ling, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969)., The Space Pirates [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) chew on his index finger, (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Faceless Ones [+]David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Ice Warriors [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968)., The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Mind Robber [+]Peter Ling, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983)., The Two Doctors [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 22 (BBC1, 1985).) or cusp his chin and lower mouth in his hand. (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968)., The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Seeds of Death [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

He would also pat himself with his handkerchief after moments of intensity. (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Ice Warriors [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968)., The Dominators [+]Norman Ashby, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Seeds of Death [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).)

He would sometimes carry food on his person to snack on during his adventures, such as sherbet lemon, (TV: The Wheel in Space [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) jelly babies, (TV: The Dominators [+]Norman Ashby, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) and an apple. (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

The Doctor possessed a recorder, which he played when he needed to pass the time, (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966)., The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Abominable Snowmen [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) to raise morale in a dire situation, (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967).) to help him to concentrate, (TV: The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) or simply as a tool to make him seem less suspicious. (TV: The Macra Terror [+]Ian Stuart Black, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) He could also use his recorder as an effective tool, having a separate mouthpiece that turned it into a spyglass, (TV: The Wheel in Space [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) and improvise it into a blowgun. (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) Because his companions disliked the instrument, (COMIC: The Forgotten [+]Tony Lee, IDW mini-series and one-shots (IDW Publishing, 2008-2009).) the Doctor took to carrying spares, (PROSE: Twin Piques [+]Tony Keetch, Short Trips: Zodiac (Short Trips, 2002)., The Avant Guardian [+]Eddie Robson, Short Trips: Time Signature (Short Trips short stories, 2006).) as playing them helped him to think. (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) He displayed a fondness of music in other ways besides the recorder, such as telling Jamie he could travel in the TARDIS in return for teaching him to play the bagpipes. (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967).)

It was during his second incarnation that the Doctor began to regularly carry a sonic screwdriver. (TV: Fury from the Deep [+]Victor Pemberton, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Dominators [+]Norman Ashby, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) He also carried a magnifying glass on his person, and would utilise it for investigation purposes, (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967)., The Faceless Ones [+]David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) and made use of a utility belt to hold his various gadgets. (COMIC: Egyptian Escapade [+]TVC comic stories (1967)., The Witches [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1967-1968)., The Cyber Empire [+]TVC comic stories (1968)., The Dyrons [+]TVC comic stories (1968).)

Skills[]

TwoInDisguiseTUM

The Doctor in disguise. (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).)

The Second Doctor had a gift for diplomacy and winning others over to his side, enabling him to fool his enemies into thinking they had an advantage over him, (TV: The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Wheel in Space [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) trick others into doing what he wished, (TV: The Faceless Ones [+]David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) and convince people into trusting him against their initial judgment, (TV: The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) The Third Doctor even acknowledged that his second incarnation was better with people than he was. (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).)

Instinctively knowing whom to trust from what he deduced of their character, (TV: The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968).) the Doctor was highly deductive, able to tell if he had fooled someone by observing their reactions to his actions, and could tell someone was hiding information from noticing absences in their behaviour or inconsistencies in their appearance. (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966)., The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) He could also triangulate a person's birthplace by studying their accent, (TV: The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968).) and notice and decipher hidden codes in anagrams and acronyms, though it could take some time. (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).)

Masquerade

The Doctor disguises himself as a Cyberman. (COMIC: Masquerade [+]TV Comic Holiday Special stories (1968).)

He was also a convincing actor, (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967)., The Evil of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) easily donning disguises without self-consciousness to age, gender, or even dignity. (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967)., The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).)

Physically younger than his predecessor, the Second Doctor was able to outrun various pursuers, (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Seeds of Death [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) and avoid weapon ammunition fired at him. (TV: The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) He proved adept at skiing, (COMIC: Eskimo Joe [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1969).) and also learned the arts of Venusian aikido on Venus. (AUDIO: Year of the Drex Olympics [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

He proved a crack shot with a pistol, having the accuracy to disable an armed opponent by shooting the weapon out of their hand, and was also effective with a whip. (COMIC: The Duellists [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (Polystyle, 1969).)

DocHypnotizesVana2

The Doctor puts Vana in a hypnotic trance. (TV: The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969).)

The Second Doctor possessed strong telepathic abilities, such as being able to use telepathy via mental projection to show Zoe Heriot one of his battles with the Daleks, (TV: The Wheel in Space [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) though he found the process tiring. (TV: The Dominators [+]Norman Ashby, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) He could also restore erased memories by placing his hands on someone's head. (AUDIO: Tales from the Vault [+]Jonathan Morris, The Companion Chronicles (2011).) He had a strong resistance to other telepaths trying to intrude into his mind, (TV: The Mind Robber [+]Peter Ling, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968)., The Two Doctors [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 22 (BBC1, 1985).) and was even able to lock his mind in battle with the Great Intelligence long enough for his friends to act against it. (TV: The Abominable Snowmen [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967).)

He was also shown to be adept with hypnosis, (TV: The Abominable Snowmen [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969).) being able to overpower the hypnotism of the Zagbor and then spend days releasing the hypnotised humans, (COMIC: The Zombies [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1967).) and was able to reverse the hypnotism of the Master. (PROSE: The Dark Path [+]David A. McIntee, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).) He could even use hypnotism to induce amnesia. (PROSE: The Roundheads [+]Mark Gatiss, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).)

The Second Doctor was a talented tinkerer, (TV: The Web of Fear [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) and a "dab hand at mechanics". (COMIC: Death Race [+]TV Comic Annual stories (1969).) He was able to create a glass harmonica out of a water glass to pick the sonic lock in his prison cell on Vulcan, (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).) construct the pedal-copter, (COMIC: Attack of the Daleks [+]TV Comic Annual stories (1968).) fix Isobel Watkins' camera, (TV: The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) design and manufacture effective vehicles, (COMIC: Return of the Witches [+]TV Comic Holiday Special stories (Polystyle Publications and Ltd., 1968)., Car of the Century [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1968).) and build a series of robots to do chores for him. (COMIC: Barnabus [+]Roger Noel Cook, TV Comic Holiday Special stories (1967)., Martha the Mechanical Housemaid [+]TVC comic stories (1969).)

While he lacked a medical degree, (TV: The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969).) he did have some medical training, (TV: The Moonbase [+]Kit Pedler, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) and could provide basic first aid when needed. (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967)., The Moonbase [+]Kit Pedler, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., Fury from the Deep [+]Victor Pemberton, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968)., The Krotons [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968-1969)., The Space Pirates [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).)

He could quickly assess the nature of new environments by analysing oxygen and temperature, and could tell if his surroundings were radioactive. (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).)

While the Doctor could pilot a helicopter with only minimal success, (TV: Fury from the Deep [+]Victor Pemberton, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) he was more successful when driving a car, (TV: The War Games [+]Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1969).) even being able to maneuver around dinosaurs while driving backwards, (COMIC: The Monsters from the Past [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1967).) or a motorbike. (COMIC: Action in Exile [+]TVC comic stories (1969).) He could also ride a horse, (COMIC: The Duellists [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (Polystyle, 1969).) and was able to commandeer the Dart to engage the Cybermen in an aerial fight that emerged victorious from. (COMIC: Test Flight [+]TV Comic Annual stories (1969).)

While he preferred to use English, the Doctor could speak French, (TV: The Mind Robber [+]Peter Ling, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) and also read Old High Gallifreyan. (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

The Doctor had an encyclopaedic knowledge of various laws, and could map the night sky, (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967).) create a fire with two sticks, (COMIC: Freedom by Fire [+]The Dr Who Annual 1969 (Doctor Who annual, 1968).) pick a lock with his tie-pin, (COMIC: Action in Exile [+]TVC comic stories (1969).) and donate indefinitely large amounts of blood. (PROSE: Heart of TARDIS [+]Dave Stone, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2000).) He was instinctively able to keep track of time, even without a way to measure its passing. (PROSE: The Murder Game [+]Steve Lyons, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).)

Appearance[]

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Info about the Doctor's facial features needs to be added

Two close

The Doctor glares at Omega. (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).)

With a height of "five foot nine", (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) the Second Doctor resembled a man in his mid-forties. (PROSE: The Nameless City [+]Michael Scott, Puffin eshort (Puffin Books, 2013).) He was physically identical to the dictator Ramón Salamander. (TV: The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968).)

He had blue eyes, (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) though one account described his eyes as being "soft chestnut brown", (PROSE: Pluto [+]Dale Smith, Short Trips: The Solar System (Short Trips, 2005).) while another depicted them as bright green. (COMIC: Bazaar Adventures [+]Scott & David Tipton, Prisoners of Time (IDW Publishing, 2013).) A fourth account claimed his eyes appeared to change colour several times, alternating between blue, grey, and green. (PROSE: Invasion of the Cat-People [+]Gary Russell, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) According to his war incarnation, the Second Doctor was colour-blind. (PROSE: The Day of the Doctor [+]Steven Moffat, adapted from The Day of the Doctor (Steven Moffat), Target novelisations (Target Books, 2018).)

Rejuvenated Doctor

The Doctor on Zaos. (PROSE: Daleks Invade Zaos [+]1967.)

When he arrived on Zaos amid an attack by the Asymmetrical Daleks, the Second Doctor appeared to have the same height, facial structure and hair cut of the First Doctor, but with black hair and a renewed vitality. (PROSE: Daleks Invade Zaos [+]1967.)

By the time of his exile on Earth, the Doctor had the mark of Blenhim on his chest due to an encounter with the alien race. (COMIC: The Mark of Terror [+]TVC comic stories (1969).)

The Doctor took pride in his unkempt appearance, and was visibly uncomfortable when attempts were made to tidy him up. (TV: The Macra Terror [+]Ian Stuart Black, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Enemy of the World [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967-1968).)

Liz Shaw told her mother that the Doctor resembled a "geography teacher" when he first encountered UNIT. (AUDIO: The Last Post [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) Polly Wright described him as looking like "an unmade bed" to Jamie, (PROSE: The Nameless City [+]Michael Scott, Puffin eshort (Puffin Books, 2013).) and "a bit sartorially challenged" to the Brigadier. (AUDIO: The Three Companions [+]Marc Platt, The Companion Chronicles: The Specials (Big Finish Productions, 2009-2010).) Madame Razetskia described the Second Doctor as a "funny little clown", (PROSE: Endgame [+]Terrance Dicks, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2000).) while William Blake saw him as "a middle aged man with a mop of black hair" when Legion took on the appearance of the Second Doctor. (PROSE: The Pit [+]Neil Penswick, adapted from Hostage, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1993).)

Steven Jenkins described the Second Doctor as "a scruffy-looking man [of] medium-height", (TV: The Faceless Ones [+]David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) while Samantha Briggs called him "a short man, with a mournful face and dishevelled clothing." She also noted that he had a "blurred" English accent, which defied description, and seemed to be extremely knowledgeable on a wide variety of subjects. (PROSE: Who Killed Kennedy [+]David Bishop, Virgin Books (1996).) Paul Magrs thought he looked like Patrick Troughton. (PROSE: Bafflement and Devotion [+]Paul Magrs, DWM short stories (Panini Publishing Ltd, 2000).)

The First Doctor called his second incarnation "a clown" due to his scruffy appearance, (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) whilst the Third Doctor labelled him a "scarecrow", (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) and the Fifth Doctor described him as a "hobo". (PROSE: Five Card Draw [+]Todd Green, Short Trips: Zodiac (Short Trips, 2002).) Being a body that was "not what [he] would have wished for," (AUDIO: The Power of the Daleks [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) the Fourth Doctor described him as having "a moptop and chequed trousers". (AUDIO: The Fate of Krelos [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) The Eighth Doctor recalled his second incarnation as being "a comic little man with a flute". (PROSE: Escape Velocity [+]Colin Brake, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2001).)

When Affinity took on the Second Doctor's appearance, the Twelfth Doctor noted that his second incarnation was "a rather scruffy gentleman, [with] dark, unruly hair" and was "clad in a jacket that seemed several sizes too big and to have been slept in." (PROSE: Silhouette [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) He also described him as "[an] annoying bumbler" with "big trousers". (PROSE: Twice Upon a Time [+]Paul Cornell, adapted from Twice Upon a Time (Steven Moffat), Target novelisations (Target Books, 2018).)

Hair and grooming[]

The Second Doctor had longish, rumpled black hair, (TV: The Tenth Planet [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).) though, after going on a stressful mission for the Time Lords, (PROSE: World Game [+]Terrance Dicks, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2005).) his hair briefly turned grey. (TV: The Two Doctors [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 22 (BBC1, 1985).)

Polly compared his hairstyle to those worn by the Beatles, (AUDIO: The Three Companions [+]Marc Platt, The Companion Chronicles: The Specials (Big Finish Productions, 2009-2010).) as did John Benton, (AUDIO: The Hexford Invasion [+]Paul Magrs, Serpent Crest (AudioGO, 2011).) Isobel Watkins, (PROSE: Who Killed Kennedy [+]David Bishop, Virgin Books (1996).) Ace, (AUDIO: The Light at the End [+]Nicholas Briggs, Big Finish Doctor Who Special Releases (Big Finish Productions, 2013).) and Jo Grant. (AUDIO: The Defectors [+]Nicholas Briggs, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2015).)

Clothing[]

Main attire[]

SecondOnVulcan

The Doctor in his Stovepipe hat. (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).)

The Second Doctor dressed similarly to his previous incarnation, though in far more clustered fashion, with his trousers held up rather high, his frock coat many sizes too large, and his bow ties often worn at a crooked angle under an outstretched shirt collar. (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).) His unkempt attire led to the Doctor being mistaken for a hobo by witnesses to his adventures, (PROSE: The Dogs of War [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) to the point that the British Army came to know him as the "Cosmic Hobo". (PROSE: Beast of Fang Rock [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

The Doctor wore a battered old black frock coat, (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).) which had pockets within the inner lining large enough to carry the TARDIS' Time Vector Generator, (TV: The Wheel in Space [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).) and a pocket sewn behind the outer breast pocket that he kept a magnet in. (TV: The Invasion [+]Derrick Sherwin, Doctor Who season 6 (BBC1, 1968).) The Doctor often kept a stylised handkerchief in the coat's breast pocket. (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967).)

Under his frock coat, he wore a plain shirt with a polka-dotted bow tie coloured in blue (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).) or red. (COMIC: The Faithful Rocket Pack [+]TVC comic stories (1967).) His shirt colours varied from a dull or bright blue. (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966)., The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) He also wore black ankle boots with brown-themed baggy plaid trousers, (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).) brown houndstooth trousers, (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) large plain grey trousers, (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) grey-themed tartan trousers, (TV: The Two Doctors [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 22 (BBC1, 1985).) yellow tartan trousers with green stripes, (COMIC: The Totally Stonking, Surprisingly Educational And Utterly Mindboggling Comic Relief Comic [+]Dan Abnett, et al., Fleetway Publications (1991).) or black-and-white checked trousers, (PROSE: The Nameless City [+]Michael Scott, Puffin eshort (Puffin Books, 2013).) all of which were kept up with either red braces with yellow patterns (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966).) white braces with a red flowers pattern, (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 10 (BBC1, 1972-1973).) yellow braces with dark, vertical lines, (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) or yellow braces with a flower pattern between two yellow and black vertical lines. (TV: The Two Doctors [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 22 (BBC1, 1985).) He also wore a gold watch on his left wrist, (COMIC: The Coming of the Cybermen [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1967).) and would occasionally wear a waistcoat. (PROSE: Daleks Invade Zaos [+]1967., The King of Golden Death [+]The Dr Who Annual 1968 (Doctor Who annual, 1967)., Golem [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

When in colder environments, the Doctor would wear a cloak, (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967)., The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967)., The Tomb of the Cybermen [+]Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967).) or an oversized fur coat. (TV: The Abominable Snowmen [+]Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Ice Warriors [+]Brian Hayles, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1967)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983)., The Name of the Doctor [+]Steven Moffat, Doctor Who series 7 (BBC One, 2013).)

The Fourth Doctor though that his second incarnation's attire was "unacceptable" for a Time Lord. (AUDIO: The Power of the Daleks [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

The Second Doctor expressed a liking for hats, stating that he "would like a hat like that" when he spotted new headgear, (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966)., The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967).; PROSE: A Comedy of Terrors [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) however, he was not afraid to part with them if the situation called for it. (COMIC: Time & Time Again [+]Paul Cornell, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1993).) His most prominent hat was a stovepipe hat, (TV: The Power of the Daleks [+]David Whitaker, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966)., The Underwater Menace [+]Geoffrey Orme, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) but he also wore a British Army tricorn while in Scotland, (TV: The Highlanders [+]Elwyn Jones and Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1966-1967).) happily accepted a ceremonially hat from the colony controlled by the Macra, (TV: The Macra Terror [+]Ian Stuart Black, Doctor Who season 4 (BBC1, 1967).) and once wore a blue beanie when on a cold beach. (TV: Fury from the Deep [+]Victor Pemberton, Doctor Who season 5 (BBC1, 1968).)

Other costumes[]

For bed wear, the Second Doctor wore white button-upped, collared pyjamas with vertical blue stripes, and also had a yellow dressing gown with a green checkered lined pattern. (COMIC: Car of the Century [+]Roger Noel Cook, TVC comic stories (1968).)

While in Paris on a mission for the Celestial Intervention Agency, the Doctor wore white breeches, a neatly-tailored long-tailed black coat with a frilled shirt and cravat, gleaming black boots and a short travelling cloak, and wore a Bregeut watch. Before visiting the palace, he changed into a black coat, black breeches, and a frilly white shirt with an elaborate black cravat.

For the Battle of Waterloo, the Doctor donned black breeches, a black evening coat, a frilled white shirt, and a white waistcoat. (PROSE: World Game [+]Terrance Dicks, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2005).)

When his first incarnation was placed on trial in 1963 London as a result of killing a werewolf with a silver bullet, the Second Doctor dressed in an ill-fitting suit. (PROSE: The Juror's Story [+]Eddie Robson, Short Trips: Repercussions (Short Trips, 2004).)

Behind the scenes[]

Casting[]

  • Rupert Davies, Valentine Dyall, Michael Hordern and Brian Blessed were all approached for the role of the Second Doctor. All declined, as they didn't want to commit to a long-running series.
  • Peter Cushing was also offered the role, but declined and later regretted his decision.[source needed]

Costume influences[]

  • Patrick Troughton initially wanted to have a Harpo Marx-like wig, but Anneke Wills convinced him to comb his hair in a Beatles-like style.[1]

Missing episodes[]

  • Almost half of the episodes from the Second Doctor's era have been lost, leaving only seven of Patrick Troughton's twenty-one television stories still fully intact, excluding his appearances in multi-Doctor specials. Five further incomplete stories have been released commercially, with specially-created material to bridge the missing episodes. Surviving "orphan" episodes and footage have been released on the Lost in Time DVD collection.

Regeneration[]

Legacy[]

Other matters[]

External links[]

Footnotes[]

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