Tardis

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Tardis
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Tardis
This story was never produced.

Therefore, its known narrative elements are not a part of the Doctor Who universe as we, on this Wiki, choose to define it. It may have been the basis for a similar story in another medium, however — and that story may indeed be valid.

Mentor was a planned Kate Orman and Jon Blum novel that would have been published alongside a Lance Parkin novel in 1998 to celebrate Doctor Who's 35th anniversary.

The novel was about an old Time Lord who had gone insane and was accidentally using the Time Lords' "observer effect" power to create a universe that was "as mad as he was".[1]

The idea was that there would be a war criminal type in both our books, and depending on which one you read first, you'd get a completely different appreciation of the situation. If you read the book in which he was an old librarian who just wanted to be left alone first, you'd think the Doctor was a bully. If you read the book where you saw him in his prime, massacring innocents, you'd want the Doctor to murder him in cold blood.Lance Parkin [[src]]

In the end, Orman and Blum were too busy writing Seeing I to write Mentor, so the idea was scrapped, and Parkin's The Infinity Doctors was released by itself in 1998.[1] These stories were connected through the Time Lord character Savar, and the proposed plot of Mentor was alluded to in one passage of The Infinity Doctors concerning Savar: "Time Lords felt time flow around them, but more than that, they helped to shape and refine time and space around them. ... Would a mad Time Lord have the opposite effect? Would his insanity become contagious, affecting the past and future like a virus?"

Orman and Blum would later reuse many of the ideas for Mentor in their 1999 Eighth Doctor novel Unnatural History, which shared noticeably many themes with Parkin's The Infinity Doctors. Parkin himself later recycled part of the "depending on which one you read first" premise in Beige Planet Mars,[1] and he revisited the "observer effect" concept in The Gallifrey Chronicles, where it motivated the non-interference policy, and The Eyeless, where it helped power the weapon.

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