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An eccentric bohemian taking in new sights while fighting the greatest of evils, the Fourth Doctor was a scarfed crusader with a strong wanderlust and a deep-seated resentment toward authority figures, which resulted in him trying to live a life of solitude to avoid being responsible for anyone, though he ironically found himself being forced into missions by the likes of the Brigadier, the Time Lords and even the White Guardian himself.

This inability to control the direction of his life led the highly eccentric Doctor to have moments of intense brooding between his oddball comments and cheeky attitude, sometimes to the point that he became callous and intimidating, and would explode with rage when his patience reached their limit. His solitude extended to his companions, who often only joined him in his TARDIS by inviting themselves aboard or when someone else persuaded the Doctor to let them join him.

Biography[]

Main article: Fourth Doctor/Biography

After he helped UNIT deal with the Scientific Reform Society, the Doctor extended an invitation to Sarah Jane Smith to keep traveling with him after his regeneration solidified, with UNIT medic Harry Sullivan joining them in the TARDIS when the Doctor wanted to prove to him that it was a time-space machine, (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975).) though Harry's fiddling with the TARDIS controls lead them to the Nerva Beacon, where they saved the crew from the Wirrn (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) and then faced the Sontaran Styre while repairing the Nerva transmat receptors. (TV: The Sontaran Experiment [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) When their return to Nerva was hijacked by the Time Lords, the TARDIS crew found themselves on a mission to interfere with the creation of the Daleks, which saw the Doctor confront their creator, Davros, for the first time when he failed to destroy the Daleks at their genesis. (TV: Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) Upon their return to the Nerva, the TARDIS crew saved the space station from the CyberNomads, (TV: Revenge of the Cybermen [+]Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) and where then summoned to Scotland by the Brigadier to help UNIT face the Zygons, with Harry opting to remain on Earth when the Doctor and Sarah left in the TARDIS. (TV: Terror of the Zygons [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).)

The Doctor and Sarah made to return to the London UNIT HQ, but were forced into several detours that saw them travel to 37166 Zeta Minor (TV: Planet of Evil [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).) and face Sutekh the Destroyer on 1911 Mars (TV: Pyramids of Mars [+]Stephen Harris, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).) before they finally arrived in time to help Harry and UNIT repel a Kraal invasion. (TV: The Android Invasion [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).)

The Doctor would remain on Earth for a time, basing himself at his cottage in Wales while Sarah continued working as an investigative journalist, (COMIC: Death Flower [+]Gerry Haylock, TVC comic stories (1975)., Return of the Daleks [+]Martin Asbury, TVC comic stories (1975)., The Sinister Sea [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1975).) though they frequently took trips in the TARDIS, (PROSE: A New Life [+]Doctor Who Annual 1976 (Doctor Who annual, 1975).) such as when the Time Lords sent them on missions to planets like Ercos (COMIC: The Dalek Revenge [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1975-1976).) and Karn, (TV: The Brain of Morbius [+]Robin Bland, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976).) and continued to assist UNIT until the Doctor finally cut ties with them after helping keep a Krynoid pod stolen by Harrison Chase from destroying the world. (TV: The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976).)

After adventures that included defeating the Mandragora Helix in 1492 San Martino, (TV: The Masque of Mandragora [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976).) Sarah decided that she had had enough of life in the TARDIS when she was possessed by the Kastrian Eldrad, just as the Doctor was called back to Gallifrey, necessitating him to leave Sarah behind as humans were not allowed on Gallifrey. (TV: The Hand of Fear [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976).) However, once he returned to the Capitol, the Doctor found that he had actually been lured back by the Decayed Master to be used as a patsy for the assassination of Lord President Pandad IV, though the Doctor was able to stall his execution by putting himself forward as a presidential candidate, allowing him time to stop the Master siphoning the powers of the Eye of Harmony to heal himself and save the Capitol from destruction. (TV: The Deadly Assassin [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976).)

After some companionless travels, the Doctor found himself joined by Leela, a warrior of the Sevateem tribe, when she forced her way into the TARDIS after helping the Doctor repair the supercomputer Xoanon. (TV: The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) After getting to know each other better while stopping a Kaldor android revolution on Storm Mine 4, (TV: The Robots of Death [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) the Doctor resolved to improve Leela's education, starting with a visit to 1892 London where they aided Henry Gordon Jago and Professor George Litefoot in battling Magnus Greel. (TV: The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).)

Shortly after fighting a Rutan scout at Fang Rock Lighthouse, (TV: Horror of Fang Rock [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977).) the Doctor and Leela were joined by the robot dog K9, despite the Doctor's objections, (TV: The Invisible Enemy [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977).) though he came to welcome K9 as his dog after a battle with the Fendahl. (TV: Image of the Fendahl [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977).) The Doctor, Leela and K9 would go on to have adventures on places such as Pluto and the P7E planet (TV: The Sun Makers [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., Underworld [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978).) until the Doctor was forced to claim the presidency of Gallifrey to thwart an invasion by the Vardans and the Sontarans, with Leela and K9 opting the stay on Gallifrey, leaving the Doctor to travel alone until he assembled K9 Mark II. (TV: The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978).)

On the White Guardian's orders, the Doctor and K9 began looking for the six segments of the Key to Time with the Time Lady Romana before they could be found by the Black Guardian. (TV: The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978).) After finding segments on Ribos, Zanak, 1978 Earth, Tara and Delta III, (TV: The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Pirate Planet [+]Douglas Adams, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1|BBC1]], 1978)., The Stones of Blood [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Androids of Tara [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Power of Kroll [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978-1979).) the TARDIS crew found the last segment in the form of Princess Astra of Atrios, and were able to complete the Key to Time, though the Doctor ordered the segments to disperse again to stop the Black Guardian claiming it, and installed a randomiser into the TARDIS to escape the vengeance of the Black Guardian, (TV: The Armageddon Factor [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1979).) with Romana continuing to travel with the Doctor into her next incarnation, with the regeneration occurring just before the Doctor and her stopped the Daleks from retrieving Davros to assist in their feud with the Movellans. (TV: Destiny of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).)

With the randomiser preventing them from choosing their destination, the Doctor and Romana jaunted around the universe, taking in the sights of 1979 Paris, (TV: City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) Chloris, (TV: The Creature from the Pit [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) the interstellar cruise liner Empress (TV: Nightmare of Eden [+]Bob Baker, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) and Skonnos, (TV: The Horns of Nimon [+]Anthony Read, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979-1980).) while also visiting 1979 Cambridge in time for Skagra's search for Shada, (PROSE: Shada [+]Gareth Roberts, adapted from Shada (Douglas Adams), BBC Books novelisations (BBC Books, 2012).) until the Black Guardian finally tracked them down, though the Doctor was able to entrapped him in the Time Vortex at the cost of him and Romana also getting trapped in a "fictional realm", (PROSE: The Well-Mannered War [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).) where they becoming inanimate toys between endless and frivolous adventures. (PROSE: Playing with Toys [+]David Agnew, Short Trips and Side Steps (Short Trips short stories, 2000).)

During a time separated from Romana, (COMIC: Timeslip [+]Dez Skinn and Paul Neary, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1980).) the Doctor and K9 were joined by Sharon Davies when she helped them capture Beep the Meep and the Doctor offered her a lift home, (COMIC: Doctor Who and the Star Beast [+]Pat Mills and John Wagner, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1980).) though her being artificially aged by a malfunctioning chrono-compensator (COMIC: Doctor Who and the Time Witch [+]Steve Moore, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1980).) lead Sharon to decide to settle down with Vernor Allen on Unicepter IV. (COMIC: Dreamers of Death [+]Steve Moore, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1980).) The Doctor then settled himself at Nest Cottage, where he joined with Mike Yates, Fenella Wibbsey and Captain the Wolfhound for a series of adventures around Hexford. (AUDIO: The Stuff of Nightmares [+]Paul Magrs, Hornets' Nest (BBC Audio, 2009).)

When he felt his regeneration nearing, (PROSE: Into the Silent Land [+]Steven A. Roman, Short Trips: Farewells (Short Trips short stories, 2006).) the Doctor became more sombre and weary at the universe, changing his clothes into a macabre burgundy and, despite Romana's objections, giving the randomiser up to the Tachyon Recreation Generator on Argolis. (TV: The Leisure Hive [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) When the Time Lords ordered Romana be returned to Gallifrey, (TV: Meglos [+]John Flanagan and Andrew McCulloch, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) the TARDIS accidentally passed into the smaller universe of E-Space, (TV: Full Circle [+]Andrew Smith, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) where the Doctor gained a new companion in the teenaged mathematical genius Adric. (TV: State of Decay [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) When they finally found the Gateway back to N-Space, Romana and K9 opted to stay in E-Space to help the enslaved Tharils release themselves from captivity, (TV: Warriors' Gate [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) while the Doctor and Adric were summoned to Traken by the Keeper to deal with the Master with the aid of Consul Tremas and his daughter, Nyssa. (TV: The Keeper of Traken [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).)

As he was observed by the Watcher that heralded his demise, the Doctor found himself and Adric accidentally picking up Tegan Jovanka as a stowaway just as they learned the Master had stolen Tremas's body and they united with Nyssa on Logopolis, where the Tremas Master accidentally started the collapse of the universe, and was forced to join with the Doctor to broadcast a CVE signal from the Pharos Project, but the Doctor was betrayed when the Master tried to blackmail the universe into his servitude and was critically injured after he fell from the antenna while stopping the Master's plan. With the assistance of the Watcher, the Doctor was able to regenerate into his next incarnation. (TV: Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).)

Other realities[]

Alternate timelines[]

In an alternate timeline created by the Discordia, the Doctor had a passionate romantic relationship with River Song that began in his first incarnation, having married her by his fourth incarnation. When he learned that the only way to defeat the Discordia was to dismantle his timeline, the Doctor admitted that he was afraid to lose River, but was reassured that they would meet again in another timeline. (AUDIO: Someone I Once Knew [+]John Dorney, The Diary of River Song: Series Four (The Diary of River Song, Big Finish Productions, 2018).)

Averted timelines[]

When the Faction Paradox altered events to cause the Third Doctor to regenerate on Dust, (PROSE: Interference - Book Two [+]Lawrence Miles, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1999).) the Fourth Doctor went on to combat the Eight Legs, (PROSE: The Blue Angel [+]Paul Magrs and Jeremy Hoad, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1999).) but was only able to halt their eventual conquest of the universe. (PROSE: The Ancestor Cell [+]Peter Anghelides and Stephen Cole, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2000).)

In a timeline created by the War Master's usage of the Anti-Genesis codes, when the Fourth Doctor was sent back to the creation of the Daleks with Harry Sullivan and Sarah Jane Smith, the Master had his Daleks ambush and exterminate them. (AUDIO: Shockwave [+]Alan Barnes, Anti-Genesis (The War Master, Big Finish Productions, 2019).)

At two different points in the Doctor's fourth incarnation, one during his time travelling with Leela and another during his adventures with Romana's second incarnation, the TARDIS picked up the signal of a temporal distorsion coming from the planet Henlen, and the Doctor went to investigate. With the Doctor and Leela in a thick jungle and the Doctor and Romana in an ever-changing city, the Doctors and their companions were pursued into a refuge where they found writings in ancient Gallifreyan, and realised they were in the TARDIS prototype that was used for the first experiment of time travel by the Time Lords, and that they were being chased by the original six pilots, who explained that the experiment was sabotaged by the Sirens of Time.

They turned into the starting point of a massive temporal paradox, which was splitting reality apart, and which trapped the pilots into a time loop. They begged the Doctor to stop the experiment and kill them, but he refused. The leader then chose to have the experiment fail himself, thus causing Time Lords never to discover time travel. As a result of his choice, the Doctors, Romana and the TARDISes were erased from time, and Leela was left to die at the hands of the Sirens. However, these events were later cancelled when the paradox was resolved. (AUDIO: Collision Course [+]Guy Adams, The Legacy of Time (Big Finish Productions, 2019).)

Prologue The Fourth Doctor (comic story)

The Doctor finds that K9 has been cyber-converted. (COMIC: Prologue: The Fourth Doctor [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

When the Cybermen allied with Rassilon to take over history, (COMIC: Supremacy of the Cybermen [+]George Mann and Cavan Scott, Titan summer events (Titan Comics, 2016).) the Doctor was confronted by a cyber-converted K9 while facing the Cybermen in a mansion, (COMIC: Prologue: The Fourth Doctor [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) and was then ambushed by the Cybermen. This timeline was eventually unwritten by Rassilon and the Twelfth Doctor. (COMIC: Supremacy of the Cybermen [+]George Mann and Cavan Scott, Titan summer events (Titan Comics, 2016).)

While travelling in E-Space, the Doctor arrived on the planet Veridis, where scientists had created a machine that could bring the dead back to life, this discovery completely destabilising society as everyone clamoured for their loved ones to be brought back from the dead. The Doctor was able to destroy the machine, but this was only possible when he and Romana sacrificed themselves to destroy it. Adric was left to make a life for himself on Veridis as the TARDIS decayed and K9 ran out of power, but when he began to experience dreams of the destruction of N-Space in the Doctor's absence, Adric developed his own time machine to go back and undo the events of the Doctor's death so that he could live to save the universe again. (AUDIO: A Full Life [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

Undone events[]

Under the influence of the Valeyard and the Dark Matrix, the Fourth Doctor was corrupted into destroying the Daleks at their very beginning. This timeline was negated when the Seventh Doctor defeated the Valeyard and released the Dark Matrix from his control. (PROSE: Matrix [+]Robert Perry and Mike Tucker, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1998).)

4 and Leela light at the end

Leela and the Doctor. (AUDIO: The Light at the End [+]Nicholas Briggs, Big Finish Doctor Who Special Releases (Big Finish Productions, 2013).)

In a negated timeline, the Doctor and Leela met the Eighth Doctor's companion, Charley Pollard, when she appeared aboard the TARDIS. As he had detected temporal disturbances in the Time Vortex, the Fourth Doctor realised that Charley was one of his companions from the future. He then met the Eighth Doctor himself and they both discovered the Decayed Master was plotting their undoing by removing their TARDIS from history. After Charley and Leela vanished, the Doctors were caught in the explosion of the Fifth Doctor's TARDIS, but were saved by the Sixth Doctor. Once a plan to stop the Master was conceived, the Fourth Doctor went to keep the Master distracted with the Eighth Doctor, and, once the Fifth Doctor had ensured that the TARDIS would not explode, joined his other seven incarnations in preparing to time ram the Master's TARDIS. However, rather than kill the Master, the First Doctor instead turned off the automatic distress actions, which had brought all of the Doctors to the pocket dimension and triggered the TARDIS' destruction, making it so none of that had happened. (AUDIO: The Light at the End [+]Nicholas Briggs, Big Finish Doctor Who Special Releases (Big Finish Productions, 2013).)

Other references[]

In the Doctor Who series that the Doctor had some part in creating, (PROSE: Afterword [+]Steven Moffat, Decalog 3: Consequences (Virgin Decalogs, 1996)., Stop, Thief! [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) the Fourth Doctor was portrayed by Tom Baker, who was Paul Magrs's favourite Doctor. (PROSE: The Story of Fester Cat [+]Paul Magrs, Fester Cat (The Berkley Publishing Group, 2014).) In a short piece that Paul wrote on his inspirations for his books, he noted that Tom Baker actually looked like the real Fourth Doctor. (PROSE: Bafflement and Devotion [+]Paul Magrs, DWM short stories (Panini Publishing Ltd, 2000).)

Psychological profile[]

Personality[]

Seeing all sapient lifeforms as his "kith", (TV: Pyramids of Mars [+]Stephen Harris, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).) the Fourth Doctor would instinctively put his own wants aside to go against all the odds to protect even his enemies from harm, (TV: Revenge of the Cybermen [+]Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Invisible Enemy [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., Underworld [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978).) regardless of their social standings, (TV: Warriors' Gate [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) wishing that the peoples of the universe would just "get along". (TV: Full Circle [+]Andrew Smith, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) Prone to mood swings, (PROSE: The Roots of Evil [+]Philip Reeve, Puffin eshort (Puffin Books, 2013).) he could be pedantic at times, often acting erratically in crisis, reacting to others with witty wisecracks and constantly changing his direction of speech, with the Sisterhood of Karn remembering him as "the prattling Doctor, full of idle questions", who often strayed from the matter at hand. (AUDIO: Sisters of the Flame [+]Nicholas Briggs, Eighth Doctor Adventures (Big Finish Productions, 2008).)

He delighted in keeping both friends and foes alike off guard with oddball humour and curious pranks, often playing the fool to lull his opponents into underestimating him, (TV: The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) but he genuinely believed that there was "no point being [a] grown-up if you [couldn't] be childish sometimes". (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975).) He always tried to stay "one step ahead of [his] enemies", (TV: The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) as he was "a very dangerous fellow when he [didn't] know what [he was] doing." (TV: Destiny of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) However, when in an emergency, the Doctor would get straight to the point and ask only the most important questions. (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Pyramids of Mars [+]Stephen Harris, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Deadly Assassin [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976).)

As he would "try anything once", (COMIC: City of the Damned [+]John Wagner and Pat Mills, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1979-1980).) the Doctor thrilled on seeing new sights, (TV: The Robots of Death [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) claiming he "wouldn't sleep at night" if he never learnt where he had been, (TV: Destiny of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) and delighted in getting himself into trouble, (TV: Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) often delivering the most frightening of news in a cheery tone and with a smile on his face. (TV: Terror of the Zygons [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., Horror of Fang Rock [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977).)

Although he was generally peace-loving and kind-hearted, the Doctor would react with explosive fury when provoked. (TV: The Sontaran Experiment [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Pyramids of Mars [+]Stephen Harris, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Brain of Morbius [+]Robin Bland, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Pirate Planet [+]Douglas Adams, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1|BBC1]], 1978)., Full Circle [+]Andrew Smith, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) He "always [got] rude when [he was] trying to cover up a mistake", (TV: Planet of Evil [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).) and, when feeling short-tempered, he could indulge in sexist remarks (COMIC: Return of the Daleks [+]Martin Asbury, TVC comic stories (1975).) and cultural in-sensitivities. (TV: Horror of Fang Rock [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977).)

The Fourth Doctor thought himself as being "a wise and wonderful person who want[ed] to help", (TV: The Power of Kroll [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978-1979).) and enjoyed being the centre of attention, sometimes getting someone to ask him questions solely so he could show off his intelligence by answering them. (TV: The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) He believed highly in himself and his brainpowers, (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Invisible Enemy [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978).) though was not completely devoid of modesty. (TV: Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., Destiny of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) He could get so deep in thought that he completely drowned out the world around him. (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., The Masque of Mandragora [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Hand of Fear [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Stones of Blood [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978).)

Viewing "one solid hope [as] worth a cartload of certainties", (TV: Warriors' Gate [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) the Doctor held a strong determination, believing that there was "no such word as can't", (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975).) that "nothing [was] hopeless", (TV: The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976).) and that there was "always a way out" of a situation. (TV: The Armageddon Factor [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1979).) He would openly antagonise his enemies as an act of defiance, (TV: Revenge of the Cybermen [+]Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Brain of Morbius [+]Robin Bland, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Sun Makers [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., Underworld [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978).) though would also charm someone in order to get them to open up for him to extract needful information. (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975).)

He could be literal-minded, (TV: The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Stones of Blood [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., Nightmare of Eden [+]Bob Baker, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) and tried to "always accept the unexpected". (TV: The Leisure Hive [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).)

As he felt his regeneration nearing, (PROSE: Into the Silent Land [+]Steven A. Roman, Short Trips: Farewells (Short Trips short stories, 2006).) the Doctor became more sombre and weary at the universe, (TV: Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) preferring sitting back and relaxing than adventuring, (TV: The Leisure Hive [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) and becoming more vulnerable and less defiant towards peril, (TV: Meglos [+]John Flanagan and Andrew McCulloch, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., Warriors' Gate [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981)., Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) even being willing to return to Gallifrey when the Time Lords summoned him, (TV: Full Circle [+]Andrew Smith, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) though he was also bitter towards the lack of control he had over his life. (TV: Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) He also had less fear for consequences, such as removing the randomiser and forgoing its protection from the Black Guardian's revenge due to feeling he was no longer a threat to him. (TV: The Leisure Hive [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).)

He liked bumblebees, (TV: The Robots of Death [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) "concise answers", (TV: City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) ghost stories, (TV: State of Decay [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) punting, (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) tigers, (AUDIO: The Circus of Doom [+]Paul Magrs, Hornets' Nest (BBC Audio, 2009).) butlers, (AUDIO: Destination: Nerva [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) badgers, (AUDIO: The Sands of Life [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) and cows. (PROSE:Psi-ence Fiction [+]Chris Boucher, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2001).) He also enjoyed playing games such as draughts, (TV: The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) chess, (TV: The Sun Makers [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Androids of Tara [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978).) four-dimensional ludo, (COMIC: Timeslip [+]Dez Skinn and Paul Neary, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1980).) and arcade games. (COMIC: Doctor Who and the Free-Fall Warriors [+]Steve Parkhouse, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics UK, 1981).)

Among his favourite times was 1911, (TV: Pyramids of Mars [+]Stephen Harris, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).) and he cited the Megatherium as being one of his favourite animals. (PROSE: The Doctor Who Dinosaur Book [+]Terrance Dicks, Target Books (1976).) He also had a great appreciation for art and antique furniture, (TV: City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) and admired the Peanuts comics. (PROSE:Psi-ence Fiction [+]Chris Boucher, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2001).)

He "hate[d] goodbyes", instead preferring to "just slip away quietly". (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975).) He also disliked guided tours, (TV: The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976).) the London Underground, (AUDIO: Lua error in Module:Cite_source at line 420: attempt to index a nil value.) insects, (COMIC: The Mutants [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1977).) the colour white, (TV: The Invisible Enemy [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977).) "gimmicky gadgets", (TV: The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978).) swimming, (PROSE: Last Man Running [+]Chris Boucher, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1998).) and bow ties. (PROSE: The Roots of Evil [+]Philip Reeve, Puffin eshort (Puffin Books, 2013).)

He liked to drink ginger beer (TV: The Android Invasion [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).) and lemonade, (PROSE: Eye of Heaven [+]Jim Mortimore, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1998).) and eat grapes, (COMIC: Treasure Trail [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1976).) oranges, (TV: The Masque of Mandragora [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976).) various ice creams, (COMIC: Doctor Who and the Free-Fall Warriors [+]Steve Parkhouse, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics UK, 1981).) doughnuts, (AUDIO: The Beautiful People [+]Jonathan Morris, The Companion Chronicles (Big Finish Productions, 2007).) and kebab. (PROSE: The Brain of Socrates [+]Gareth Roberts, Short Trips: The Muses (Short Trips, 2003).) Aside from jelly babies, he also liked aniseed balls and humbugs, (AUDIO: The Circus of Doom [+]Paul Magrs, Hornets' Nest (BBC Audio, 2009).) but disliked celery. (AUDIO: The Beautiful People [+]Jonathan Morris, The Companion Chronicles (Big Finish Productions, 2007).) He took his tea with eight sugars. (COMIC: Doctor Who and the Star Beast [+]Pat Mills and John Wagner, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1980).)

Viewing it as "a free cosmos", (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975).) the Fourth Doctor held a consistently anti-authoritarian attitude, with little tolerance for the bureaucracy of military protocol and police procedures, (TV: The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., Nightmare of Eden [+]Bob Baker, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) seeing himself as a free agent who was "just having fun", (TV: Nightmare of Eden [+]Bob Baker, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) but held a begrudging respect for the White Guardian. (TV: The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978).)

Not only was he more inclined towards a solitary existence, (TV: The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978).) such as wishing to be left alone when he had a task to complete, (TV: The Sontaran Experiment [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) the Doctor also emphasised his distance from humanity. (TV: Pyramids of Mars [+]Stephen Harris, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).) He also generally maintained his distance from the Time Lords, and resented that they were capable of controlling his travels whenever they pleased, (TV: Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Brain of Morbius [+]Robin Bland, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Creature from the Pit [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) as he "[didn't] like not knowing where [he was] going to turn up next". (TV: The Leisure Hive [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).)

The Doctor had little patience for "religious gobbledygook" (TV: The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) and "superstitious rubbish". (TV: The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) He also tried to avoid being certain of things, as he thought it "a sign of weakness", (TV: The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) as there was "enough uncertainty in the universe" for one to "never guess unless [they had] to." (TV: Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) He considered failure to be "one of the basic freedoms". (TV: The Robots of Death [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).)

He didn't believe in "feminine intuition", (COMIC: Death Flower [+]Gerry Haylock, TVC comic stories (1975).) "hardly" believed in ghosts, (COMIC: The Eerie Manor [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1978).) and considered his lucky numbers to be 7 (TV: The Power of Kroll [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978-1979).) and 740,384,338. (TV: The Creature from the Pit [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).)

He was almost completely devoid of fear, reacting unfazed to threats of pain, (TV: The Sun Makers [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) and assassination attempts, (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., The Android Invasion [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Robots of Death [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) friendlily greeting threats to his safety. (TV: The Sontaran Experiment [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Terror of the Zygons [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Android Invasion [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Stones of Blood [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Androids of Tara [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Creature from the Pit [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., The Horns of Nimon [+]Anthony Read, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979-1980).) However, he did fear the powers of the Wirrn, (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) Sutekh, (TV: Pyramids of Mars [+]Stephen Harris, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).) the Fendahl, (TV: Image of the Fendahl [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977).) and the Black Guardian. (TV: The Armageddon Factor [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1979).) He was also afraid of losing his own sanity. (PROSE: The Fear [+]Alexander Leithes, Short Trips: A Universe of Terrors (Short Trips, 2003).) When it seemed he was doomed, he resolved to accept his fate, lamenting the long life he had lived (TV: The Power of Kroll [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978-1979).) and the friends he had with him. (TV: The Horns of Nimon [+]Anthony Read, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979-1980).)

Fourth doctor angry

The Doctor's fury. (TV: Pyramids of Mars [+]Stephen Harris, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).)

Despite his charm and offbeat humour, the Fourth Doctor could be intensely brooding, serious and even callous at times, (TV: Pyramids of Mars [+]Stephen Harris, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Deadly Assassin [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., Horror of Fang Rock [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977).) and would keenly scrutinise his surroundings even when playing the fool. (TV: Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Revenge of the Cybermen [+]Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Destiny of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) He was not against taking a life in extreme circumstances, (TV: The Sontaran Experiment [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Brain of Morbius [+]Robin Bland, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Armageddon Factor [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1979)., Meglos [+]John Flanagan and Andrew McCulloch, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) but would scold Leela for unnecessary killings. (TV: The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).)

In his darker moments, the Doctor threatened to deactivate Davros' life-support machine to coerce him into destroying the Daleks, (TV: Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) fatally electrocuted an attacking Tesh under Xoanon's control, (TV: The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) handed Maximillian Stael a gun with the knowledge he would use it for suicide without much convincing, (TV: Image of the Fendahl [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977).) and seemed to have nothing against Leela killing random attackers, as long as she kept quiet about it. (TV: The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) He was also willing to sacrifice himself in order to kill Davros via an explosive device in an attempt to prevent the Daleks harnessing their creator. (TV: Destiny of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).)

Though he was much less inclined to use physical violence than his predecessor, the Fourth Doctor would react aggressively if he had no alternative but to defend himself. (TV: The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Deadly Assassin [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., Nightmare of Eden [+]Bob Baker, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) However, he would try to see if he could reason with his opponents before he resorted to force, (PROSE: Doctor Who and the Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terrance Dicks, adapted from Genesis of the Daleks (Terry Nation), Target novelisations (Target Books, 1976).) and would try to ensure that only those that deserved it were harmed by his actions. (PROSE: The Roots of Evil [+]Philip Reeve, Puffin eshort (Puffin Books, 2013).)

Armed and dangerous

The Doctor retreats, covering himself with a handgun. (TV: The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976).)

While he voiced a dislike for guns, (TV: Pyramids of Mars [+]Stephen Harris, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).) and claimed he would never use one, (TV: The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976).) he was willing to use the likes of the De-mat Gun and Earth firearms if necessary, (TV: The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Deadly Assassin [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., Image of the Fendahl [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978).) though preferred to improvise a non-lethal way of escaping a situation, (TV: The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) making a point to never carry a weapon so as not to give reason for people to harm him. (TV: The Robots of Death [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).)

Nevertheless, the Doctor still had a strong moral code, such as confronting J.P. Kettlewell about how the ends never justified the means, (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975).) telling Sorenson that scientists "buy [their] privilege[s] to experiment at the cost of total responsibility" for the outcome, (TV: Planet of Evil [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).) and admonished harming an innocent for science as nothing short of "coldblooded murder". (TV: Full Circle [+]Andrew Smith, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) When ready to destroy the Daleks before the creation, the Doctor hesitated when he realised he would be no better himself than the Daleks if he committed genocide against them. (TV: Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) He was also appalled at the actions of the Captain, (TV: The Pirate Planet [+]Douglas Adams, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1|BBC1]], 1978).) and refused to listen to Tryst's attempts to justify drug-running in order to fund his scientific work, simply telling him to go away. (TV: Nightmare of Eden [+]Bob Baker, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).)

However, when the situation called for it, the Doctor could be ruthless in how he acquired results, (TV: Revenge of the Cybermen [+]Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) and become particularly brutish in how he subdued his opponents. (TV: The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976).) He did not take kindly to his friends being physically attacked, (TV: The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) and also scolded a Tharil for unprovokedly knocking down a servant. (TV: Warriors' Gate [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) He also despised how greed drove people to complicate a situation. (TV: The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976).)

He looked down on computers, deeming them to be "sophisticated idiots" due to how they "[did] exactly what [someone told] them [to do] at amazing speed[s]" while being "very difficult [at] stop[ping] [from] obeying the original order" if told to stop, (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975).) and also admonished them for lacking imagination. (TV: The Invisible Enemy [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977).) However, he did not look done on robotic species like the Metalupiterons, saying they had "many fine qualities", and saw both them and humans as an equal "mass of circuits and electronical responses". (COMIC: Menace on Metalupiter [+]Doctor Who Annual 1977 (Doctor Who annual, World Distributors and Ltd, 1976).)

While he knew it was dangerous to tamper with history, to the point that he would avoid places where he was "out of time", the Doctor would ignite "a little revolution" if it didn't compromise the overall history. (COMIC: The Emperor's Spy [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1975).)

The Doctor was not above the occasional act of hypocrisy, such as telling Harry Sullivan that it was a waste to throw something away, immediately before disregarding a piece of metal that had saved his life. He also told Harry it was "a mistake to clutter one's pockets", despite he himself keeping a large variety of things in his own pockets. (TV: The Sontaran Experiment [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) He later took an instant liking to Romana's second incarnation when she mimicked his dress sense, despite previously telling her that "external appearances weren't important". (TV: Destiny of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) He also chastised Bernice Summerfield for her apparent strange sense of priorities while under threat, (COMIC: Time & Time Again [+]Paul Cornell, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1993).) and was unwilling to admit to any wrongdoing on his part. (TV: The Sun Makers [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977).)

He was also not averse to deliberately angering his companions as a motivation for them to achieve a task to prove him wrong, (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) nor was he above winding then up on occasion, such as fooling Leela into playing with a yo-yo for an extended period of time, with her believing it was a form of magic, (TV: The Robots of Death [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) or causing Romana to panic when he pretended to be corrupted by the Key to Time. (TV: The Armageddon Factor [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1979).)

The Fourth Doctor would affectionately call his other incarnations his "dears". (TV:Dimensions in Time [+]John Nathan-Turner and David Roden, Doctor Who 30th anniversary special (BBC1, 1993).) He thought his third incarnation was "arrogant", (PROSE: Old Flames [+]Paul Magrs, Short Trips (Short Trips short stories, 1998).) and an "incorrigible show-off", (PROSE: Categorical Imperative [+]Simon Guerrier, Short Trips: Monsters (Short Trips short stories, 2004).) but thought that his first incarnation was a "slyboots". (WC: Doctors Assemble! [+]James Goss, Doctor Who: Lockdown! (2020).)

When he came across a statue of the Eleventh Doctor, the Fourth Doctor criticised his future self's nose and bow tie, and also expressed shock of his use of the word "cool." (PROSE: The Roots of Evil [+]Philip Reeve, Puffin eshort (Puffin Books, 2013).) However, when he met his eleventh incarnation in person, he found that he got along well with him, (AUDIO: Babblesphere [+]Jonathan Morris, Destiny of the Doctor (Big Finish Productions, 2013).) and also easily cooperated with the Eighth Doctor. (AUDIO: The Light at the End [+]Nicholas Briggs, Big Finish Doctor Who Special Releases (Big Finish Productions, 2013).)

While the Fifth Doctor thought of his fourth incarnation as being "a careless freewheeler who thought he was invincible", (AUDIO: Excelis Dawns [+]Paul Magrs, Excelis Saga (Big Finish Productions, 2002).) the Eighth Doctor remembered his fourth incarnation as a "casual bohemian" who "dared to take on the evil that stalk[ed] the dark". (PROSE: The Eight Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1997).)

Because he did not like the responsibility of looking after them, (TV: The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978).) the Fourth Doctor would rarely invite others to travel with him, a majority of his companions inviting themselves aboard the TARDIS, (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., State of Decay [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) or having someone else persuade the Doctor to let them join him. (TV: The Invisible Enemy [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) Nevertheless, the Doctor had a close friendship with his companions, and would be crestfallen when they left him. (TV: Terror of the Zygons [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Hand of Fear [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., Warriors' Gate [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).)

He considered Sarah Jane Smith and K9, and implicitly Leela, to be his best friends. (TV: The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., Underworld [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978).) However, he viewed Harry Sullivan as an imbecile, (TV: Revenge of the Cybermen [+]Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) and believed that any intelligence that Harry showed was entirely due to his influence. (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).)

The Fourth Doctor also started a trend of talking to the TARDIS, (TV: The Deadly Assassin [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Robots of Death [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., Image of the Fendahl [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Horns of Nimon [+]Anthony Read, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979-1980).) constantly showing affection for his magnificent machine by kissing it and caring for it when it got damaged, (TV: The Invisible Enemy [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978).) and being defensive when it's capabilities were being belittled. (COMIC: Doctor Who and the Free-Fall Warriors [+]Steve Parkhouse, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics UK, 1981).)

Unlike his predecessors, the Fourth Doctor did not maintain a close working relationship with UNIT, keeping his distance from the organisation except for a handful of occasions, reacting with anger and disdain whenever he was recalled back to Earth by the Brigadier. (TV: Terror of the Zygons [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., Pyramids of Mars [+]Stephen Harris, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).)

The Doctor found mankind to be his favourite species, (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Masque of Mandragora [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976).) describing them as "indomitable" for having "survived flood, famine and plague" and "cosmic wars and holocausts", (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) but also acknowledged that when they "[got] together in great numbers, other lifeforms sometimes suffer[ed]". (TV: The Invisible Enemy [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977).) As it was his favorite planet, (TV: The Stones of Blood [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978).) he considered Earth to be his "home", (COMIC: Kling Dynasty [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1977).) especially 20th century England. (COMIC: The Snow Devils [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1978).)

FourthDoctor Romana slah

The Doctor and Romana, moments before the Doctor kissed her on the cheek. (PROSE: The Well-Mannered War [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).)

Younger in appearance than his previous incarnations, the Fourth Doctor found himself drawing closer to his companions than he might have previously. (TV: School Reunion [+]Toby Whithouse, Doctor Who series 2 (BBC One|BBC One]], 2006).) He tended not to display such feelings himself, being mostly oblivious to other people's attractiveness, believing that telling Countess Scarlioni that she was "probably beautiful" was a compliment, (TV: City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) although he acknowledged that Romana was attractive in her first incarnation, (TV: The Pirate Planet [+]Douglas Adams, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1|BBC1]], 1978).) and even kissed her second incarnation. (PROSE: The Well-Mannered War [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).) The Doctor felt a close connection with Romana, due to her being a Time Lord with ideas like his, and was even tempted to cease travelling to be with her, (PROSE: Notre Dame du Temps [+]Nick Clark, Short Trips: Companions (Short Trips, 2003).) even proposing marriage to her after being prompted by the Prime Computer. (TV: On Through the 80's! [+]Tom Baker, Prime Computer ads (1980).)[[on thr

The Fourth Doctor thought a person having a hatred for children was a poor sign of character. (TV:Dimensions in Time [+]John Nathan-Turner and David Roden, Doctor Who 30th anniversary special (BBC1, 1993).) He himself "usually [got] on terribly well with children." (TV: Full Circle [+]Andrew Smith, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).)

Commander Stevenson openly wondered if the Fourth Doctor was "quite right in the head", with Harry Sullivan agreeing that he had his "absent minded moments", (TV: Revenge of the Cybermen [+]Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) and Richard Dunbar asking if he was "quite sane". (TV:The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976).) Sarah Jane Smith, when comparing him to his immediate predecessor, likened the Fourth Doctor to an "older brother in for the weekend and in a spot of bother". (PROSE: Still Need a Title! [+]James Goss and Steve Tribe, The Doctor: His Lives and Times (2013).)

Leela described the Doctor as being "very difficult sometimes, but he [had] great knowledge and gentleness." (TV: Image of the Fendahl [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977).) According to K9 Mark I, a number of people described the Doctor as "the most insufferably arrogant, overbearing, patronising bean tin." (TV:The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978).) Adric described the Fourth Doctor as "unpredictable, intimidating and enigmatic, but brilliant". (AUDIO: Psychodrome [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

In her first incarnation, Romana diagnosed him with having "massive compensation syndrome", (TV: The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978).) stating that he was "capricious, arrogant, self-opinionated, irrational, and [didn't] even know where [he was] going", (TV: The Armageddon Factor [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1979).) while her second incarnation would admit in private that he was an "incredibly resourceful and intelligent person". (PROSE: The Well-Mannered War [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).)

The Tremas Master referred to Fourth Doctor as "the bohemian, [and] the wanderer" who was keen to "abandon his roots" and thus "abandoned his sense". (GAME: Destiny of the Doctors [+]Hannah Redler, Gary Russell, Terrance Dicks and Andy Russell, BBC Multimedia (1997).) When the Eighth Doctor had a tarot card reading, the Fourth Doctor was identified as "the Fool". (PROSE: The City of the Dead [+]Lloyd Rose, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2001).)

Logopolis3

The Doctor speaks with Adric and Nyssa, while the Watcher heralds the coming end of his life. (TV: Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).)

After seeing himself being observed by the Watcher, the Doctor became aware his end was nearing, adopting a resigned mood while vowing to stop the Tremas Master, eventually losing the strength to keep his grip on the Pharos Project radio telescope's gantry, and fell to his death. As he lay dying, the Doctor spent his last moments thinking of his past companions, and then explained to his present friends that the moment of his regeneration had been prepared for, with a serene glance and a final grin. (TV: Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).)

Habits and quirks[]

Fourth Doctor eating allsort

While offering jelly babies, the Doctor eats an allsort. (TV: The Sun Makers [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977).)

The Fourth Doctor would often have jelly babies with him, and offered them as a greeting or peace offering. (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Robots of Death [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., Image of the Fendahl [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Sun Makers [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., Destiny of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., Nightmare of Eden [+]Bob Baker, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., The Horns of Nimon [+]Anthony Read, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979-1980).) His personal favourites were the orange coloured jelly babies. (TV: The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978).)

The Fourth Doctor would also let out aloud, "Ah", when he came to a realisation, (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., The Sontaran Experiment [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Terror of the Zygons [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Hand of Fear [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Deadly Assassin [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Pirate Planet [+]Douglas Adams, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1|BBC1]], 1978)., The Armageddon Factor [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1979)., The Horns of Nimon [+]Anthony Read, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979-1980)., The Leisure Hive [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) noticed something of interest, (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Planet of Evil [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Brain of Morbius [+]Robin Bland, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Invisible Enemy [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., Image of the Fendahl [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Stones of Blood [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., Meglos [+]John Flanagan and Andrew McCulloch, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., State of Decay [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) needed to explain himself, (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Stones of Blood [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., State of Decay [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) or as a response to someone's explanation. (TV: The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Robots of Death [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Stones of Blood [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Androids of Tara [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Armageddon Factor [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1979)., Dr. Who For Keep Australia Beautiful [+]1979., City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., The Creature from the Pit [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., Meglos [+]John Flanagan and Andrew McCulloch, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., State of Decay [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., The Keeper of Traken [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981)., Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) He would say, "Ah, there you are", when he noticed that someone had entered his presence or where someone was. (TV: Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Terror of the Zygons [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Androids of Tara [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Horns of Nimon [+]Anthony Read, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979-1980).)

He would often say, "come on", when instructing his companions to follow him, as he believed saying it marked him as "the one who leads". (TV: Image of the Fendahl [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977).) He would also say, "come along", for a similar reason. (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Brain of Morbius [+]Robin Bland, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Stones of Blood [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978).)

The Doctor often talked to himself, (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Pyramids of Mars [+]Stephen Harris, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Stones of Blood [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., State of Decay [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).) or acted like he was interacting with someone that wasn't there, (TV: Disney Time [+]Fourth Doctor television appearances (1975)., The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., Image of the Fendahl [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., Dr. Who For Keep Australia Beautiful [+]1979., The Creature from the Pit [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., Warriors' Gate [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) with Sarah Jane Smith stating he did so "mostly because [he was] the only person who [knew] what [he was] talking about". (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).)

He would say, "well...", whenever he was about to explain something, (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Terror of the Zygons [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Brain of Morbius [+]Robin Bland, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Hand of Fear [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Invisible Enemy [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., Image of the Fendahl [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., Underworld [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Stones of Blood [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., The Leisure Hive [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., The Keeper of Traken [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981)., Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) and would often interrupt himself with a, "still...", when attempting to explain something and wanted to elaborate on what he was talking about. (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Pirate Planet [+]Douglas Adams, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1|BBC1]], 1978).)

Whenever he heard something he didn't like, he would shout, "what". (TV: Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Brain of Morbius [+]Robin Bland, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Invisible Enemy [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Sun Makers [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., Underworld [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Pirate Planet [+]Douglas Adams, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1|BBC1]], 1978)., The Androids of Tara [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., Dr. Who For Keep Australia Beautiful [+]1979., Destiny of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., Step Into the 80's! [+]Tom Baker, Prime Computer ads (1979)., Nightmare of Eden [+]Bob Baker, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., The Horns of Nimon [+]Anthony Read, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979-1980)., On Through the 80's! [+]Tom Baker, Prime Computer ads (1980)., The Leisure Hive [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., State of Decay [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., Warriors' Gate [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981)., The Keeper of Traken [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).)

When reaching a conclusion, he would utter, "of course". (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Revenge of the Cybermen [+]Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Terror of the Zygons [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., Image of the Fendahl [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Pirate Planet [+]Douglas Adams, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1|BBC1]], 1978)., The Stones of Blood [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Armageddon Factor [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1979)., Destiny of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., Nightmare of Eden [+]Bob Baker, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., The Horns of Nimon [+]Anthony Read, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979-1980)., The Leisure Hive [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., Meglos [+]John Flanagan and Andrew McCulloch, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., State of Decay [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) When met with a concept he rejected, he would describe the ideas as "rubbish". (TV: The Sontaran Experiment [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Hand of Fear [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Deadly Assassin [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Sun Makers [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Pirate Planet [+]Douglas Adams, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1|BBC1]], 1978)., The Armageddon Factor [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1979).)

The Doctor would say, "splendid", when celebrating a positive outcome, receiving good news or describing a place he liked, (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Revenge of the Cybermen [+]Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Pyramids of Mars [+]Stephen Harris, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., Image of the Fendahl [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Pirate Planet [+]Douglas Adams, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1|BBC1]], 1978).) and often quoted literature. (TV: Revenge of the Cybermen [+]Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Planet of Evil [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Android Invasion [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Robots of Death [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., Horror of Fang Rock [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Power of Kroll [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978-1979)., State of Decay [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., Warriors' Gate [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).)

He would often ask others if they were listening to him, (TV: The Android Invasion [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Armageddon Factor [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1979).) and would tell people to "shut up" when he was concentrating. (TV: Terror of the Zygons [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Sun Makers [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., Underworld [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Stones of Blood [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., Destiny of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).)

He frequently called those who annoyed him with their perceived poor planning and clumsiness an "idiot", (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Deadly Assassin [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Androids of Tara [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) and would often describe an inhumane adversary as an "unspeakable abomination". (TV: The Sontaran Experiment [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Brain of Morbius [+]Robin Bland, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976).)

The Fourth Doctor was prone to boggling his eyes out while flashing his upper teeth in a grin. (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Revenge of the Cybermen [+]Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Terror of the Zygons [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Masque of Mandragora [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Deadly Assassin [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Robots of Death [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Sun Makers [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Pirate Planet [+]Douglas Adams, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1|BBC1]], 1978)., Destiny of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., The Creature from the Pit [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., Meglos [+]John Flanagan and Andrew McCulloch, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., State of Decay [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., The Keeper of Traken [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).)

When he was not pushing back the ends of his coats to put his hands in his trouser pockets, (TV: Horror of Fang Rock [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., Image of the Fendahl [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., Underworld [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Power of Kroll [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978-1979)., The Armageddon Factor [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1979)., Season 17 Launch Trailer [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW., Destiny of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., Step Into the 80's! [+]Tom Baker, Prime Computer ads (1979)., The Creature from the Pit [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., The Horns of Nimon [+]Anthony Read, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979-1980)., Dr. Who For Keep Australia Beautiful [+]1979., On Through the 80's! [+]Tom Baker, Prime Computer ads (1980).) the Doctor would instead rest his knuckles on the pockets' edges. (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Android Invasion [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Brain of Morbius [+]Robin Bland, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., Horror of Fang Rock [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Sun Makers [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Stones of Blood [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Armageddon Factor [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1979).) Other times, he would place his hands in the pockets of his coat, especially with his burgundy jacket. (TV: The Leisure Hive [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., Meglos [+]John Flanagan and Andrew McCulloch, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., Full Circle [+]Andrew Smith, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., State of Decay [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., The Keeper of Traken [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981)., Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).)

The Doctor tended to run his hand through his hair when concentrating on something, (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Pyramids of Mars [+]Stephen Harris, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Masque of Mandragora [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Invisible Enemy [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Stones of Blood [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Armageddon Factor [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1979)., City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) or to calm himself after moments of intensity. (TV: Revenge of the Cybermen [+]Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Masque of Mandragora [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Pirate Planet [+]Douglas Adams, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1|BBC1]], 1978)., The Androids of Tara [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., The Creature from the Pit [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).)

When in thought, he would scratch at his thumb with his teeth. (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., Planet of Evil [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., Pyramids of Mars [+]Stephen Harris, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Android Invasion [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Creature from the Pit [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) To allure a sense of mystery, the Doctor would often tap his nose when keeping secrets. (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., The Brain of Morbius [+]Robin Bland, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Creature from the Pit [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).)

When relaxing, the Doctor tended to put his feet up on a ledge and lean back, often placing his hat over his face as he dowsed off. (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., Terror of the Zygons [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., Image of the Fendahl [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Androids of Tara [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978).) He tended to lightly smack himself when he came to a realisation. (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978)., The Armageddon Factor [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1979)., On Through the 80's! [+]Tom Baker, Prime Computer ads (1980)., State of Decay [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).)

The Doctor would play with a yo-yo to relax or help determine new environments, (TV: The Ark in Space [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Revenge of the Cybermen [+]Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Android Invasion [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Brain of Morbius [+]Robin Bland, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Masque of Mandragora [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976).) and also carried a small telescope that he sometimes used to assess his surroundings. (TV: City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., State of Decay [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980).)

According to one account, the Fourth Doctor always carried a piccolo on his person, telling Sarah that he "always played the piccolo when [he was] nervous" to "relieve the tension". (AUDIO: Lua error in Module:Cite_source at line 420: attempt to index a nil value.)

When complimenting his female companions' achievements, the Doctor would say, "good girl".[source needed] When confused, he would give a quiet, "eh".[source needed] He frequently rubbed his index finger under his nose.[source needed] He often whistled to himself.[source needed] He would shush people to get them to be silent.[source needed] He would sometimes react with dread to a name, only to then admit he had never heard of the person.[source needed] He frequently said, "I see", when responding to someone.[source needed] He would pull at his face when in thought.[source needed] He sometimes drooped his face.[source needed]

Skills[]

Much like his immediate predecessor, the Fourth Doctor was very physical, being talented at evasive manoeuvres, (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., Revenge of the Cybermen [+]Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) an excellent runner, (TV: Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Terror of the Zygons [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976).) and a skilled hand-to-hand fighter, (TV: The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Masque of Mandragora [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) being capable of withstanding levels of pain that would normally kill a human. (PROSE: The Romance of Crime [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).)

He was strong enough to carry Malcolm Sillett over his shoulders, (COMIC: Death Flower [+]Gerry Haylock, TVC comic stories (1975).) and was capable of rendering someone unconscious with a single blow. (TV: Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Planet of Evil [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975)., The Seeds of Doom [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976)., The Hand of Fear [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Power of Kroll [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978-1979)., City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979)., State of Decay [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1980)., The Keeper of Traken [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) He could also briefly tussle with a Mandrel, (TV: Nightmare of Eden [+]Bob Baker, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) and utilise Venusian aikido to overpower some Ice Warriors. (GAME: Lost in Time [+]Doctor Who video games (Eastside Games, 2022).)

Showing incredible accuracy, the Doctor was able to effortlessly throw a gun to Harry with a baton, (TV: Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).) hit a bullseye on a dart board, (TV: The Android Invasion [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).) strike a strand of rope with a crossbow, (TV: The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) throw an axe at Magnus Greel's distillation machine to free Leela, (TV: The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) and land his hat on a Dalek eyestalk. (TV: Destiny of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).) He could also gather information from his surroundings to accurately deduce a situation. (COMIC: Under Pressure [+]Dan Abnett, Doctor Who Yearbook comic stories (Marvel Comics UK, 1991).)

He was also shown to be a highly skilled swordsman, (TV: The Masque of Mandragora [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976)., The Androids of Tara [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978).) even when using a club as a substitute blade. (TV: The Sontaran Experiment [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975).)

The Fourth Doctor possessed telepathic powers, allowing him to hide his spirit within a "sleeping psyche" should his body be compromised (COMIC: The Body Snatcher [+]Doctor Who Annual 1977 (Doctor Who annual, World Distributors and Ltd, 1976).) and project his mind over long distances to communicate with other telepathic users. (TV: The Pirate Planet [+]Douglas Adams, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1|BBC1]], 1978).) Due to his "complex mind", he was able to immunise himself from other telepaths. (TV: The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978).) He was also able to overpower the Second Morbius in a mindbending duel, though his victory left him severely weakened, with only the Elixir of Life being able to revive him. (TV: The Brain of Morbius [+]Robin Bland, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1976).)

Claiming to be a master hypnotist, (TV: The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) the Fourth Doctor was able to use hypnosis on people with simple eye contact, (TV: Terror of the Zygons [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).) by laying his hands on their temples (TV: The Hand of Fear [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976).) with well-chosen vocal commands, (TV: The Face of Evil [+]Chris Boucher, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Sun Makers [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978).) or with use of a fob watch. (TV: The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977)., The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978).)

The Doctor could take ordinary household appliances and construct a gadget out of them to assist him in his objectives. (COMIC: Doctor Who and the Star Beast [+]Pat Mills and John Wagner, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1980).) He also could repair an android. (TV: The Androids of Tara [+]David Fisher, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978).)

Despite not being a doctor of medicine, (COMIC: The Mutant Strain [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1976).) the Fourth Doctor possessed "considerable medical knowledge", (COMIC: The Space Ghost [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1975).) being able to diagnose and treat a sprained ankle, (COMIC: Death Flower [+]Gerry Haylock, TVC comic stories (1975).) and check a pulse with his knee. (PROSE: The English Way of Death [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).)

The Doctor could read with incredible speed, (COMIC: Death Flower [+]Gerry Haylock, TVC comic stories (1975).) detect the level of immuno-agents in blood by its smell, (PROSE: The English Way of Death [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) and see through cloaking-fields. (PROSE: Managra [+]Stephen Marley, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).)

The Doctor could still drive Bessie, (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975).) was able to commandeer and ride a horse with ease, (TV: The Masque of Mandragora [+]Louis Marks, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976).) and could pilot an aircar. (TV: The Pirate Planet [+]Douglas Adams, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1|BBC1]], 1978).) He once admitted to Sarah Jane that he could easily control the destination of his TARDIS if he really wanted to, but that he preferred to only do so in moments of importance. (PROSE: Evolution [+]John Peel, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).) He could also drive a forklift (COMIC: Death Flower [+]Gerry Haylock, TVC comic stories (1975).) and figure out how to operate a Dalek driller. (COMIC: The Dalek Revenge [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1975-1976).)

The Doctor could speak Mandarin and Cantonese, among other dialects, (TV: The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) such as Swahili. (AUDIO: Trail of the White Worm [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) He could also speak Ancient Latin. (COMIC: The Space Ghost [+]John Canning, TVC comic stories (1975).)

Like several of his other incarnations, the Fourth Doctor's pockets appeared to be dimensionally transcendental, as he carried a large array of bizarre items in his pockets. (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975)., Genesis of the Daleks [+]Terry Nation, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., Revenge of the Cybermen [+]Gerry Davis, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1975)., The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) He could also hold his breath for an extended period of time by using a technique taught to him by a Tibetan monk, (TV: Terror of the Zygons [+]Robert Banks Stewart, Doctor Who season 13 (BBC1, 1975).) and was talented with sleight of hand pickpocketing. (TV: The Ribos Operation [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978)., City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).)

If his mind came under attack, the Doctor could force himself into a healing coma. (TV: The Invisible Enemy [+]Bob Baker and Dave Martin, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1977)., The Invasion of Time [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 15 (BBC1, 1978).) He could judge character keenly, almost instantly knowing whom not to trust. (TV: The Power of Kroll [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978-1979)., City of Death [+]David Agnew, Doctor Who season 17 (BBC1, 1979).)

The Doctor could also easily draw caricatures of people, (TV: The Deadly Assassin [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1976).) perform magic tricks, (TV: The Talons of Weng-Chiang [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 14 (BBC1, 1977).) produce a scream powerful enough to shatter glass, (TV: The Power of Kroll [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 16 (BBC1, 1978-1979).) write decryption algorithms for computers, (PROSE: System Shock [+]Justin Richards, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1995).) and play poker. (PROSE: The Drosten's Curse [+]A. L. Kennedy, adapted from The Death Pit, (informally) BBC Books past Doctor novels (BBC Books, 2015).)

Appearance[]

Fourth Doctor smile

The Fourth Doctor smiling. (TV: Robot [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who season 12 (BBC1, 1974-1975).)

Standing at 6'4", (PROSE: The Romance of Crime [+]Gareth Roberts, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books,