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Youthful in appearance, the Fifth Doctor was a put-upon adventurer who tried to follow the principles of fair play in a universe that bedevilled him with great tragedy and violent endings, leading him to better appreciate the "small, beautiful events" in life. While he held a keen interest in science and exploration, his greatest love was cricket.

Being highly eager to see new discoveries, he was prone to being easily distracted and getting caught up in his own thoughts, sometimes to the point where he got himself and others into trouble simply by not paying enough attention, and would find misunderstandings with local authorities landing him imprisoned due to his preference to being honest and reserved instead of making himself an imposition.

Indeed, the Doctor struggled to take actions he deemed immoral, and became highly conflicted about the choices he could make in a crisis, with his hesitancies making him seemingly more fallible than his other incarnations, though he remained one of the most overtly fearless incarnations, frequently finding himself right in the thick of battle.

Biography[]

Main article: Fifth Doctor/Biography

Starting his life by defeating his archenemy, the Tremas Master, at Castrovalva, the Fifth Doctor inherited a team of companions from his fourth incarnation; Adric, Nyssa and Tegan Jovanka. (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) In his early travels, the Doctor often found himself stuck between Tegan's pessimism and Adric's arrogance, with Nyssa helping him stand as a voice of reason as they attempt to return Tegan to Heathrow Airport, though instead found the TARDIS landing at places such as Monarch's ship (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) and the planet Deva Loka, where the Doctor did battle with the Mara for the first time. (TV: Kinda [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) However, after an adventure in 1666 London, which saw the Doctor's sonic screwdriver destroyed by a Terileptil, (TV: The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) Tegan decided to forgo returning to her old life and instead enjoy her travels with the TARDIS crew, such as a party at 1925 Cranleigh Hall. (TV: Black Orchid [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) However, the disadvantages of having three traveling companions showed themselves when Adric began to feel unappreciated when compared to Nyssa and Tegan, and his need to prove himself led to him pointlessly sacrificing his life during a battle with the CyberNeomorphs when he attempted to prevent a space-freighter from crashing into prehistoric Earth, not knowing it was the fixed point in time that lead to the extinction of the dinosaurs. (TV: Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) As the Doctor, Nyssa and Tegan tried to process Adric's sudden death, the TARDIS ironically landed at Heathrow Airport, where, after a battle with the Master, the Doctor and Nyssa left Tegan behind. (TV: Time-Flight [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).)

The Doctor and Nyssa's jaunts through time and space saw them bear witness to the creation of the Cybermen on Mondas, (AUDIO: Spare Parts [+]Marc Platt, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2002).) become stranded in 1867 London after Thomas Brewster stole the TARDIS, (AUDIO: The Haunting of Thomas Brewster [+]Jonathan Morris, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2008).) and enjoying brief travels with Brewster (AUDIO: The Boy That Time Forgot [+]Paul Magrs, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2008).) and Hannah Bartholemew. (AUDIO: Moonflesh [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) A brief break from Nyssa (AUDIO: Renaissance of the Daleks [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2007).) saw the Doctor team up with Shayde and Justin of Wells to fight Melanicus in Stockbridge, (COMIC: The Tides of Time [+]Steve Parkhouse, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1982).) and meet Maxwell Edison, (COMIC: Stars Fell on Stockbridge [+]Steve Parkhouse, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1982).) as well as briefly travel with Gus Goodman (COMIC: 4-Dimensional Vistas [+]Steve Parkhouse, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1983).) until he was killed by the Moderator. (COMIC: The Moderator [+]Steve Parkhouse, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1983-1984).)

A chance reunion with Tegan in Amsterdam coincided with the Doctor seeing his old foes return again, such as Omega (TV: Arc of Infinity [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) and the Mara, (TV: Snakedance [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) and bumping into his tenth incarnation, (TV: Time Crash [+]Steven Moffat, Doctor Who Children in Need Special 2007 (BBC One, 2007).) while his own inability to mourn Adric eventually caused the Doctor to take some time apart from his companions (AUDIO: Conversion [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) when Marcipor, a Greek slave who had joined the TARDIS crew after being freed, (AUDIO: Tartarus [+]David Llewellyn, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2019).) was partially cyber-converted. (AUDIO: Conversion [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) Marc later left to stay on XB93. (AUDIO: Nightmare of the Daleks [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

The return of the Black Guardian saw Vislor Turlough, a Trion exiled to Brendon Public School, join the TARDIS crew on the Guardian's orders, so that he may assassinate the Doctor, (TV: Mawdryn Undead [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) and then saw Nyssa depart to help treat the victims of Lazar's disease on the Terminus space station. (TV: Terminus [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) In the battle for Turlough's allegiance, the Doctor was able to convince him to defy the Black Guardian with Enlightenment. (TV: Enlightenment [+]Barbara Clegg, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) While attempting to return Turlough to his home planet, the TARDIS crew found themselves re-joined by an older Nyssa, (AUDIO: Cobwebs [+]Jonathan Morris, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2010).) until she elected to remain in E-Space. (AUDIO: The Entropy Plague [+]Jonathan Morris, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2015).) The Doctor then found himself picking up a new companion in Kamelion, a shape-changing android he liberated from the Master at 1215 Fitzwilliam Castle. (TV: The King's Demons [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) However, Kamelion's inability to ward off the influence of strong minds lead him to decide to remain within the TARDIS indefinitely, (AUDIO: The Kamelion Empire [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) just as the Doctor brought the TARDIS to the Eye of Orion for a holiday that left him and his previous incarnations forced to partake in the Game of Rassilon by Borusa, who sough the immortality promised by Rassilon, but Borusa was instead imprisoned in stone, with the High Council offering the Doctor to succeed him in the Presidency, an offer he declined. (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

As his travels continued, the Doctor, Tegan and Turlough found themselves embroiled in more grisly escapades, such as a complete massacre on Sea Base 4, (TV: Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) though a holiday in 1984 Little Hodcombe offered a short reprieve from the bleakness, (TV: The Awakening [+]Eric Pringle, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) until they saw first-hand the despair of human survivors on Frontios in the far future. (TV: Frontios [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) Tegan opted to leave the TARDIS when witnessing the casualties of the Daleks extraction of Davros to cure the Movellan virus proved too much for her. (TV: Resurrection of the Daleks [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) Turlough himself would leave after he found that his exile on Trion had ended during a holiday at 1984 Lanzarote, which also saw Kamelion killed when he could no longer fight off the Master's control of him and the Doctor was joined by Peri Brown, an American student Turlough had saved from drowning. (TV: Planet of Fire [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).)

In their adventures together, the Doctor and Peri were joined by Erimem, an uncrowned Pharaoh from ancient Egypt, (AUDIO: The Eye of the Scorpion [+]Iain McLaughlin, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2001).) until she decided to settle down with King Pelleas on Peladon. (AUDIO: The Bride of Peladon [+]Barnaby Edwards, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2008).) During a side adventure without Peri, the Doctor was forced to reassemble the Key to Time with the humanoid tracer Abby, (AUDIO: The Judgement of Isskar [+]Simon Guerrier, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2009).) and then became embroiled in the exploits of her and her "twin sister", Zara. (AUDIO: The Garden of Storms [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

During his final adventure, the Doctor accidentally exposed himself and Peri to unrefined spectrox, contracting fatal spectrox toxaemia. Though he acquired an antidote, the Doctor was only able to save enough for one person in his last trek to the TARDIS, and gave it all to Peri, gambling on a regeneration saving his life. (TV: The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) Despite the Master trying to mentally interfere with the process, the Doctor successfully managed to regenerate into a new body with the aid of Nyssa and Kamelion. (AUDIO: Winter [+]Paul Cornell, Circular Time (Main Range, Big Finish Productions, 2007).)

Other realities[]

Alternate timelines[]

In one timeline, the Doctor was able to save Adric. In another alternative timeline, the Doctor had his brain fried by the computer while substituting for a dead synch-op on Sea Base 4 in 2084. (PROSE: So Vile a Sin [+]Ben Aaronovitch and Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).)

In one timeline, the Doctor permanently died on Androzani Minor due to the Great Intelligence's interference. (TV: The Name of the Doctor [+]Steven Moffat, Doctor Who series 7 (BBC One, 2013).) In a different alternative timeline, the Doctor never went to Androzani Minor. (PROSE: So Vile a Sin [+]Ben Aaronovitch and Kate Orman, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1997).)

In a timeline visited by Same and Different, the Doctor perished trying to stop the Cybermen in Agrippina Primus. (PROSE: The Paradox Moon [+]Dave Rudden, The Wintertime Paradox (BBC Children's Books, 2020).)

Averted timelines[]

Fifth Doctor and Peri Run from Cyberman Supremacy of the Cybermen

The Doctor and Peri run from a timeline-enforced Cyberman. (COMIC: Supremacy of the Cybermen [+]George Mann and Cavan Scott, Titan summer events (Titan Comics, 2016).)

When the Cybermen allied with Rassilon to take over history, (COMIC: Supremacy of the Cybermen [+]George Mann and Cavan Scott, Titan summer events (Titan Comics, 2016).) the TARDIS was caught in a time corridor that led the Doctor and Peri to Skaro, which was occupied by the Cybermen, who began to attack, (COMIC: Prologue: The Fifth Doctor [+]George Mann and Cavan Scott, Supremacy of the Cybermen prologues (Titan Comics, 2016). forcing the Doctor and Peri to flee. This timeline was eventually unwritten by Rassilon and the Twelfth Doctor. (COMIC: Supremacy of the Cybermen [+]George Mann and Cavan Scott, Titan summer events (Titan Comics, 2016).)

In an alternate timeline created by the influence of the Valeyard using the Dark Matrix, the Fifth Doctor was able to resist the Valeyard's influence for most of his life, but he eventually succumbed at what would have been his regeneration, taking the bat's milk antidote to the Spectrox toxaemia and letting Peri die in his place. This timeline was eventually undone by the Seventh Doctor. (PROSE: Matrix [+]Robert Perry and Mike Tucker, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1998).)

Undone events[]

In a negated timeline, the Doctor and Nyssa followed mysterious coordinates to 23 November 1963, but the Doctor landed the TARDIS earlier than the coordinates indicated to avoid a trap. Investigating their surroundings, the Doctor and Nyssa were approached by Bob Dovie, who mistook them for the police officers he had contacted about his missing family, and discovered that Dovie's wife and children had been murdered by the Decayed Master. As they made their way back to the TARDIS, Dovie followed them, and his refusal to believe in the TARDIS set off the conceptual bomb the Master had planted on him, causing the TARDIS to explode, but the Doctor was saved by his sixth incarnation. Joining with his other selves to formulate a plan to stop the Master, the Fifth Doctor realised the solution was to visit Dovie a year earlier and introduce him to the TARDIS, so that he would find it more believable when he had the conceptual bomb and it would not go off. Once his plan succeeded, the Fifth Doctor joined his other seven incarnations in preparing to time ram the Master's TARDIS. However, rather than kill the Master, the First Doctor instead turned off the automatic distress actions, which had brought all of the Doctors to the pocket dimension and triggered the TARDIS' destruction, making it so none of that had happened. (AUDIO: The Light at the End [+]Nicholas Briggs, Big Finish Doctor Who Special Releases (Big Finish Productions, 2013).)

Splintered into his future[]

This section's awfully stubby.

Info from Secrets of Telos [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW. needs to be added

In a splintered timeline, (AUDIO: The Auton Infinity [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) after departing from the Urbankan spaceship, the Doctor passed out almost immediately after Nyssa collapsed, and found himself pulled along his own timeline. He first ended up in the body of his future self, at a point where Adric had "left" the TARDIS and Tegan had recently resumed her travels with him and Nyssa. The Doctor soon discovered the TARDIS had jumped back along her temporal vector, looking for a stable time track, and he believed he has done the same thing. (AUDIO: Secrets of Telos [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

Next, he found himself in the body of his "near-future" self, with the TARDIS having just arrived in 9th century Iceland. He is relieved to see Adric again and, during an encounter with Ice Warriors, confides in him about his recent "time shifting" as he had done so with the future Nyssa and Tegan. After defeating the Ice Warriors, the Doctor felt himself be pulled along his timeline once again (AUDIO: God of War [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) and woke up in a cell next to the Brigadier, who recognised his current incarnation. He then reunited with Tegan, explaining how he had time shifted again, which becomes clear when he fails to recognise Turlough.

The Doctor is soon briefed on the Autons and the Master's scheme and, during an encounter with a Nestene, discovered that he is not in the body of his future self, but rather an Auton duplicate. He is later confronted by the Master, who initially believed him to merely be a convincing double, but soon realised he can use the "Auton Doctor" as a replacement "keystone" for piloting the Vortex Driller after the "future Doctor" escapes. Due to the Doctor being in an Auton body, the process did not work correctly and caused the "Auton Doctor" to be displaced once again, only this time he ended up as a psychic projection within his TARDIS next to another future companion called Kamelion.

After making contact with his future self, the Doctor helped formulate a plan to stop the Nestene Consciousness taking control of the Driller. After successfully defeating the Consciousness, it is revealed that the displaced Doctor was actually a disintegrating splinter and could no longer return to his intial point of origin. The splinter was allowed to make one last trip into the future, where he met Peri and positively reflected on his future before fading away. (AUDIO: The Auton Infinity [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

Psychological profile[]

Personality[]

Anticipate

The Doctor reassures his friends on their predicament. (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).)

Practicing good manners in the hopes that people would give him "the benefit of the doubt" he was non-hostile and share their resources, (TV: Kinda [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Snakedance [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) the Fifth Doctor saw "small beautiful events" as being "what life [was] all about", (TV: Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) with an "ordinary life" being a "precious jewel" that was "one of the mosty shining things of all", (TV: Earthshock [+]Russell T Davies, Tales from the TARDIS (BBC iPlayer, 2023).) and would go against the rules to offer a helping hand wherever he found someone in need, (TV: Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Terminus [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Frontios [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) being willing to make enormous personal sacrifices simply to keep his friends safe and liberate others from suffering, (TV: Mawdryn Undead [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) and would try to stop and help others with their mundane troubles while in the middle of dealing with greater threats. (TV: Arc of Infinity [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).)

He could see the qualities in others and sought to bring out their potential. (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) He was even willing to take chances with companions like Vislor Turlough and Kamelion, who were originally threats, (TV: Mawdryn Undead [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., The King's Demons [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) even as he pretended to be unaware of it in order to grant Turlough the opportunity to do the right thing. (TV: Enlightenment [+]Barbara Clegg, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) However, he tried to avoid confrontation with his companions when they were upset with him, opting to ignore them until they had calmed down. (TV: The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) According to Tegan Jovanka, he would often "take everything in [his] stride", (TV: The King's Demons [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) and downplayed how events went when explaining them to people. (TV: The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).)

However, the Doctor's boyish appearance, nervous energy, and charm all hid the fact that he was a Time Lord of great power and knowledge. (TV: Snakedance [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Mawdryn Undead [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Enlightenment [+]Barbara Clegg, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) He was not without an ego, happily saying when he was good at a subject after someone admitted they were not, (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) and being overly confident when he knew how good he was at something. (TV: The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) He would put on a false smile to lure his opponents into underestimating him until he could think his way out of a situation, (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) and was not afraid to antagonise his enemies as an act of defiance, (TV: Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) and declare his intent to interfere in their plans. (TV: Arc of Infinity [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).)

Originally, the Fifth Doctor acted like a child excited to see new discoveries and foreign places. (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Kinda [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) However, after the death of Adric, (TV: Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) he acted more openly stressed out and passive to harsh developments. (TV: Arc of Infinity [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Snakedance [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Terminus [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) As he was more exposed to the growing violence he encountered in his travels, the Doctor became more malaise to the carnage he saw throughout the universe, (TV: Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., Frontios [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., Resurrection of the Daleks [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) to the point that he alienated Tegan from the TARDIS. (TV: Resurrection of the Daleks [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) The sudden betrayals he also endured (TV: Arc of Infinity [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) caused the Doctor to develop trust issues, to the point that he threatened to cut ties with Turlough if he dared to deceive him. (TV: Planet of Fire [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).)

No longer trying to be "old and grumpy and important" like his previous incarnations, (TV: Time Crash [+]Steven Moffat, Doctor Who Children in Need Special 2007 (BBC One, 2007).) though worried his youthful body would not be taken seriously, (AUDIO: Smoke and Mirrors [+]Steve Lyons, Destiny of the Doctor (Big Finish Productions, 2013).) the Fifth Doctor was very open and vulnerable in his naivety, trying to focus on seeing the friendlier side of the universe by giving aliens the benefit of the doubt towards their intentions, opting to "look on the bright side" when things looked grim. (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) He gained trust by proving himself with his honesty instead of using his vast experience as an excuse to take charge. (TV: Black Orchid [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Snakedance [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., The King's Demons [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) Indeed, he could easily fall into the thrall of those who had the strong command presence that he lacked. (TV: Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983)., The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) However, he would take charge in moments of intensity, (TV: Kinda [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Frontios [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., Resurrection of the Daleks [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) and, while he needed a piece of the Great Crystal to face down the Mara, (TV: Snakedance [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) the Doctor could still call upon great willpower when the need arose. (TV: The King's Demons [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Planet of Fire [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., Dimensions in Time [+]John Nathan-Turner and David Roden, Doctor Who 30th anniversary special (BBC1, 1993).)

Unlike his other incarnations, he would seek out the highest authority when he landed so as to make his case for cooperation, (TV: Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) though his trouble with being assertive would often lead to him running afoul with local authorities and being arrested or imprisoned. (TV: Kinda [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Black Orchid [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Snakedance [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) He would particularly earn the ire of authoritative figures when his actions were mistaken for tomfoolery or treachery. (TV: Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The King's Demons [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).)

His young appearance was reflected in the youthfulness of his companions, whom he treated akin to how a teacher would treat their schoolchildren, to the point of patronising them, (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Snakedance [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) and would scold them severely when their failure to heed his instructions resulted in him being put at a disadvantage. (TV: Enlightenment [+]Barbara Clegg, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).)

He could also lose his temper when around someone who annoyed him, (TV: Time Crash [+]Steven Moffat, Doctor Who Children in Need Special 2007 (BBC One, 2007).) and was known to get impatient when pressed for time. (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Arc of Infinity [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Frontios [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) He was unafraid to point out how others were complicating matters with their pride (TV: Black Orchid [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) or apparent idiocy, (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Mawdryn Undead [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Time Crash [+]Steven Moffat, Doctor Who Children in Need Special 2007 (BBC One, 2007).) and would become particularly irked when he was being put to death as a scapegoat for others to avoid dealing with their problems when there were alternative solutions. (TV: Arc of Infinity [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Frontios [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).)

He was notably for his use of sarcasm, especially when simultaneously dealing with Tegan and Adric, (TV: The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) and was proficient with puns. (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Enlightenment [+]Barbara Clegg, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) He also felt suited for settling down and starting a family. (AUDIO: Loups-Garoux [+]Marc Platt, adapted from The Werelings, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2001)., No Place Like Home [+]Iain McLaughlin, Big Finish DWM originals (Big Finish Productions, 2003)., Winter [+]Paul Cornell, Circular Time (Main Range, Big Finish Productions, 2007).)

Being highly curious and eager to learn and explore, the Fifth Doctor would often let his curiosity dictate his decision making, leaving him to being easily distracted and getting caught up in his own thoughts and musings, to the point where he got himself and others into trouble simply by not paying enough attention to his surroundings, even when he knew that such a mind-set was one of his flaws. (TV: Black Orchid [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).)

A hit for six

The Doctor plays cricket. (COMIC: Time & Time Again [+]Paul Cornell, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1993).)

After finding a cricket bat and discovering a room in his TARDIS dedicated to the sport shortly after his regeneration, the Fifth Doctor became a vivid fan of cricket, (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) often spending long periods of time playing the game, (TV: Black Orchid [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).; PROSE: Happy Endings [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996)., Goth Opera [+]Paul Cornell, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).; AUDIO: Autumn [+]Paul Cornell, Circular Time (Main Range, Big Finish Productions, 2007).) attending several famous matches, (AUDIO: The Roof of the World [+]Adrian Rigelsford, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2004)., Nekromanteia [+]Austen Atkinson, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2003)., The Emerald Tiger [+]Barnaby Edwards, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2012).; PROSE: Graham Dilley Saves the World [+]Iain McLaughlin and Claire Bartlett, Short Trips: Past Tense (Short Trips, 2004).) and teaching his companions the rules of the game. (AUDIO: Phantasmagoria [+]Mark Gatiss, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 1999).)

He also liked "long walks", (TV: The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) and having live audience participation in large shows. (AUDIO: Nekromanteia [+]Austen Atkinson, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2003).) He felt a genuine sense of awe while in Cairo, (PROSE: Never Seen Cairo [+]Darren Sellars, Short Trips: A Christmas Treasury (Short Trips short stories, 2004).) and though of Vortis as somewhere he could relax. (AUDIO: Return to the Web Planet [+]Daniel O'Mahony, Bonus Releases (Big Finish Productions, 2007).)

He did not like earrings, (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) disliked being referred to as "sweet", (AUDIO: The Entropy Composition [+]Rick Briggs, The Demons of Red Lodge and Other Stories (Main Range, Big Finish Productions, 2010).) had a disdain for cats, (AUDIO: No Place Like Home [+]Iain McLaughlin, Big Finish DWM originals (Big Finish Productions, 2003).) felt uncomfortable around spiders, (PROSE: Light at the End of the Tunnel [+]Mark Wright, Short Trips: Steel Skies (Short Trips, Big Finish Productions, 2003).) and, with the exception of Susan, rarely thought about his family. (AUDIO: No Place Like Home [+]Iain McLaughlin, Big Finish DWM originals (Big Finish Productions, 2003).) He also disliked slavery. (PROSE: Tip of the Tongue [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

While he didn't "[feel] at home" on Gallifrey, (AUDIO: No Place Like Home [+]Iain McLaughlin, Big Finish DWM originals (Big Finish Productions, 2003).) he did consider returning to his home planet as a retirement plan. (COMIC: The Tides of Time [+]Steve Parkhouse, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1982).)

His drink of choice was lemonade with ice, (TV: Black Orchid [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) and he also liked tea, (TV: The Awakening [+]Eric Pringle, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) believing it to be one of the things about the universe he loved. (AUDIO: Omega [+]Nev Fountain, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2003).) He took his tea with either two sugars (AUDIO: The Eternal Summer [+]Jonathan Morris, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2009).) or with milk and no sugar. (AUDIO: The Elite [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) He considered fresh chilled orange juice to be "one of the finest things about Earth". (PROSE: Fascination [+]David J. Howe, Decalog (Virgin Decalogs, 1994).)

He also enjoyed jam, (AUDIO: Plague of the Daleks [+]Mark Morris, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2009).) kippers, and porridge. (PROSE: Empire of Death [+]David Bishop, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2004).)

The Doctor thought that it was best to "learn by [his] mistakes", (TV: The Awakening [+]Eric Pringle, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) and looked for "possibilities" that he "[could] never imagine", as he wanted to know how they worked and help them to work better. (AUDIO: Loups-Garoux [+]Marc Platt, adapted from The Werelings, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2001).) While he preferred to take risks alone, he conceded that "a risk shared [was] a risk doubled". (TV: Frontios [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).)

Watching Masters burn

The Doctor watches the Master burn. (TV: Planet of Fire [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).)

Unwilling to accept that violence was "a universal way of life", (TV: Resurrection of the Daleks [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) the Fifth Doctor was disdainful towards needless deaths, (COMIC: In Their Nature [+]Scott & David Tipton, Prisoners of Time (IDW Publishing, 2013).) and tried his best to avoid using violence when "there [could] [be] another way", (TV: Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., The Awakening [+]Eric Pringle, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) not even tolerating violence when it was being used to rescue him. (TV: Arc of Infinity [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) He was particularly furious when Peter Sandoz shot Miss Tremayne when she was threatening him with a knife, believing he could have talked her down. (AUDIO: Winter for the Adept [+]Andrew Cartmel, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2000).) When he resorted to dubious actions, the Doctor had to reassure himself that his actions were done without choice, believing he could convince himself with enough repetition. (COMIC: Lunar Lagoon [+]Steve Parkhouse, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1983).)

However, he did possess a dark side, gunning down foes when he deemed it necessary, (TV: Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Arc of Infinity [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., Resurrection of the Daleks [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) and not moving to save the Master from a fiery death, though was deeply upset by his part in it. (TV: Planet of Fire [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) He was also willing to physically slap someone to calm them down, (COMIC: Stars Fell on Stockbridge [+]Steve Parkhouse, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1982).) and accepted a pistol from King Louis, but only so he would not contradict the king. (AUDIO: The Church and the Crown [+]Cavan Scott and Mark Wright, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2002).)

While he failed to execute Davros in cold blood, (TV: Resurrection of the Daleks [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) he did destroy Kamelion at the android's request. (TV: Planet of Fire [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) He also once shot the Master non-fatally in the chest to subdue him. (PROSE: A Town Called Eternity [+]Lance Parkin and Mark Clapham, Short Trips and Side Steps (Short Trips short stories, BBC Books, 2000).)

While his feelings were hurt when Adric called him "decidedly immature" when in comparison to his fourth incarnation, (TV: Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) the Fifth Doctor showed off an immature and childish side when he went to great lengths to avoid doing something he personally did not want to do, coming up with every excuse he could to prevent himself from being forced into action. (TV: Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).) When Tegan voiced her unease with traveling with Kamelion, the Doctor pranked her by pretending to take her reluctance as a sign she didn't want to travel with him anymore, and even acted like he was going to return her home when he had instead set course for the Eye of Orion, just to tease her, (TV: The King's Demons [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) and later playfully poked fun at her older appearence when they reunited in the remembered TARDIS. (TV: Earthshock [+]Russell T Davies, Tales from the TARDIS (BBC iPlayer, 2023).)

The Doctor could fail to notice when his companions did not want to follow his instructions, (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) when they were trying to show off a new outfit to him, (TV: Snakedance [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Enlightenment [+]Barbara Clegg, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) or were not enjoying themselves in their adventures as much as he was, (TV: Resurrection of the Daleks [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) and he could be dismisses of people when his mind was focused elsewhere. (COMIC: Stars Fell on Stockbridge [+]Steve Parkhouse, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1982).)

He also tried to find a positive approach to life, even if it was a delusional one, (AUDIO: Iterations of I [+]John Dorney, The Fifth Doctor Box Set (Big Finish Productions, 2014).) such as fixating on the idea that Mondas was 1950s Trafalgar Square, wilfully ignoring the mine carts and giant underground cavern overhead. (AUDIO: Spare Parts [+]Marc Platt, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2002).) When he and Nyssa were arrested for using future currency during the Jacobin era, the Doctor tried to console Nyssa by pointing out that they still used Earth-based coins. (AUDIO: Summer [+]Mike Maddox, Circular Time (Main Range, Big Finish Productions, 2007).)

The Fifth Doctor identified himself as being open-minded, likening himself to Alice as he "[tried] to believe three impossible things before breakfast". As such, he was willing to give his enemies the benefit of the doubt, such as when he met the Master in the Death Zone on Gallifrey, and was willing to hear him out when the Master said he had come to aid the Doctor. When the High Council confirmed the Master's story, the Doctor admitted that he had done the Master an injustice by doubting him. (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

The Fifth Doctor though his third incarnation was the "dandiest dandelion", while the Third Doctor criticised his fifth incarnation for "wearing [a] salad". (WC: Doctors Assemble! [+]James Goss, Doctor Who: Lockdown! (2020).)

Immediately after his regeneration, the Sixth Doctor told Peri Brown that his predecessor had "a sort of feckless charm [that] simply wasn't [him]", (TV: The Twin Dilemma [+]Anthony Steven, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) but later admitted to Evelyn Smythe that "being him was like a holiday", adding that it was "a very wonderful holiday". (AUDIO: The 100 Days of the Doctor [+]Paul Cornell, 100 (Main Range, Big Finish Productions, 2007).)

The Seventh Doctor described the Fifth Doctor as "bland" and "not even one of the good ones", while the Fifth Doctor was repulsed by his seventh incarnation's manipulative nature. (PROSE: Cold Fusion [+]Lance Parkin, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) However, despite the animosity between the two, in the Seventh Doctor's subconscious, the Fifth Doctor personified his conscience due to his strong sense of compassion. (PROSE: Timewyrm: Revelation [+]Paul Cornell, adapted from Total Eclipse, Virgin New Adventures (Virgin Books, 1991).) The Eighth Doctor was fonder of his fifth incarnation than his two immediate predecessors, describing him as "terribly polite." (AUDIO: The Four Doctors [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

FifthTenthDoctorTC1

The Doctor and his tenth incarnation. (TV: Time Crash [+]Steven Moffat, Doctor Who Children in Need Special 2007 (BBC One, 2007).)

The Tenth Doctor expressed a fondness for his fifth incarnation, seeing him as a turning point and stating that it was after his fourth regeneration when he began to enjoy his time in younger bodies. He also confessed that certain aspects of his wardrobe and personality were influenced by the Fifth Doctor. (TV: Time Crash [+]Steven Moffat, Doctor Who Children in Need Special 2007 (BBC One, 2007).)

When the Eleventh Doctor contacted the Fifth Doctor through an Ovid sphere in England in the 1920s, he commented that his fifth incarnation was "grumpy" and "frowny" in part because he worried about being taken seriously due to his youthful appearance. (AUDIO: Smoke and Mirrors [+]Steve Lyons, Destiny of the Doctor (Big Finish Productions, 2013).)

The Doctor was highly protective of his TARDIS, becoming particularly irritated when he thought Nyssa had been tampering with it, (TV: Time-Flight [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) and frustrated when he thought the Tenth Doctor had changed his console control room design. (TV: Time Crash [+]Steven Moffat, Doctor Who Children in Need Special 2007 (BBC One, 2007).)

Although they often argued with each other, the Doctor told Lady Adela Forster that Tegan Jovanka was "very dear" to him, (AUDIO: The Emerald Tiger [+]Barnaby Edwards, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2012).) and also told Tegan that he "[couldn't] bear the thought of not having [her] around", (PROSE: Qualia [+]Stephen Fewell, Short Trips: Companions (Short Trips, 2003).) though he would often hide from her in the TARDIS' Cloister Room. (AUDIO: No Place Like Home [+]Iain McLaughlin, Big Finish DWM originals (Big Finish Productions, 2003).) Tegan claimed that the Doctor often gave her "half pained [and] half patronising" looks. (AUDIO: Aquitaine [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

The Doctor thought that Adric was "daft, and silly, and sulky", but also knew he was "just a kid". (TV: Earthshock [+]Russell T Davies, Tales from the TARDIS (BBC iPlayer, 2023).)

The Fifth Doctor somewhat looked down on humanity for being "parochial", and "fly[ing] off the handle" when they did not get their wishes, (TV: The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) and could become patronising when trying to correct someone who refused to listen to him. (TV: Snakedance [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) While he "always had a soft spot for Earth", (COMIC: 4-Dimensional Vistas [+]Steve Parkhouse, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1983).) he openly questioned his fondness for the "pathetic humans" of the "miserable planet" Earth when they elected to kill "noble races" in the name of retribution, (TV: Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) though conceded that England was "one of the last few civilised places left in the galaxy". (COMIC: The Stockbridge Horror [+]Steve Parkhouse, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1982-1983).)

The Fifth Doctor believed the Master to be "the most evil force in the universe". (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).)

He viewed his fourth incarnation's hesitation at averting the creation of the Daleks to have been "a mistake". However, while he did not hesitate to destroy Daleks, he was unable to bring himself to kill Davros with a gun to his face, ultimately giving Davros time to escape. (TV: Resurrection of the Daleks [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).)

Two days after he recovered from his post-regeneration trauma, Tegan described the Fifth Doctor as "an incompetent lunatic who talks gibberish", and Adric saw him as a "feckless, frivolous dilettante" who was an inferior replacement to the Fourth Doctor. (AUDIO: Psychodrome [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.') At a later date, Tegan described him as "the most annoying man that [she had] ever met". (AUDIO: Aquitaine [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) On one occasion, she derisively referred to the Doctor as a "posho". (AUDIO: The Peterloo Massacre [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

Roz Forrester did not trust the Fifth Doctor, as she believed the fact that he seemed so trustworthy was suspicious. (PROSE: Cold Fusion [+]Lance Parkin, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) River Song noted the Fifth Doctor's "sweet, but strangely short-tempered," personality, as well as his obsession with the Eye of Orion. (GAME: The Eternity Clock [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) When the Eighth Doctor had a tarot card reading, the Fifth Doctor was identified as "the Star". (PROSE: The City of the Dead [+]Lloyd Rose, BBC Eighth Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2001).)

The Tremas Master believed that the Fifth Doctor was "the nice one [with] such charm, innocence, [and] naiveté", (GAME: Destiny of the Doctors [+]Hannah Redler, Gary Russell, Terrance Dicks and Andy Russell, BBC Multimedia (1997).) while the Reborn Master described him as "the drippy blonde one" who "wander[ed] around like nobody's ever played cricket ever". (AUDIO: The Two Masters [+]John Dorney, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2016).) Helen referred to him as "the compassionate". (AUDIO: The Sirens of Time [+]Nicholas Briggs, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 1999).)

After he and Peri became infected with spectrox toxaemia, the Doctor became determined to save Peri from dying of the poison, (TV: The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) even holding back his impending regeneration. (AUDIO: Winter [+]Paul Cornell, Circular Time (Main Range, Big Finish Productions, 2007).) After he accidentally dropped half of the bat's milk remedy, the Doctor selflessly gave Peri all that remained of the antidote, saving her life at the cost of his own. (TV: The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) Reaching out for aid in gathering his strength, (AUDIO: Winter [+]Paul Cornell, Circular Time (Main Range, Big Finish Productions, 2007).) the Doctor felt comforted as he saw visuals of his past companions appearing before him. Though he was content to die, when he saw the face of the Master taunting him, the Doctor choose to survive with a regeneration so as to not let the Master have "the last laugh". (PROSE: The Caves of Androzani [+]Terrance Dicks, adapted from The Caves of Androzani (Robert Holmes), Target novelisations (Target Books, 1985).)

Habits and quirks[]

DavisonWIthGlasses

The Doctor wearing his "brainy specs". (TV: Frontios [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).)

When needing to examine something, the Fifth Doctor would sometimes sport a pair of glasses. (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Kinda [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Frontios [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., Planet of Fire [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., Time Crash [+]Steven Moffat, Doctor Who Children in Need Special 2007 (BBC One, 2007).) While he claimed to need them due to a weakness in his right eye, (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) the Tenth Doctor confessed that these "brainy specs" only served to make his fifth incarnation look "a bit clever". (TV: Time Crash [+]Steven Moffat, Doctor Who Children in Need Special 2007 (BBC One, 2007).)

When not instructing people to follow him with an utterance of "come on", (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The King's Demons [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983)., Resurrection of the Daleks [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., Earthshock [+]Russell T Davies, Tales from the TARDIS (BBC iPlayer, 2023).) the Fifth Doctor would instead instruct someone to follow his lead by saying, "this way". (TV: Arc of Infinity [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Snakedance [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Terminus [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., Dimensions in Time [+]John Nathan-Turner and David Roden, Doctor Who 30th anniversary special (BBC1, 1993).)

To encourage others, the Doctor would tell them to have a "brave heart", especially with Tegan. (TV: Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Enlightenment [+]Barbara Clegg, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., The Awakening [+]Eric Pringle, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., Earthshock [+]Russell T Davies, Tales from the TARDIS (BBC iPlayer, 2023).) He was also known to say, "Sorry, must dash", especially when leaving in a hurry. (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

He typically introduced himself with the greeting, "How do you do?". (TV: Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Terminus [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Enlightenment [+]Barbara Clegg, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Frontios [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) When met with disappointment or adversity, he would utter a defeated, "oh, no". (TV: The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Mawdryn Undead [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Terminus [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Planet of Fire [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., Time Crash [+]Steven Moffat, Doctor Who Children in Need Special 2007 (BBC One, 2007).)

During his early days, the Fifth Doctor's voice was prone to becoming high pitched in moments of intensity, (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) something that the Tenth Doctor found comradery in. (TV: Time Crash [+]Steven Moffat, Doctor Who Children in Need Special 2007 (BBC One, 2007).)

As rather stagnant incarnation, the Fifth Doctor would usually alternate between having his hands crossed behind his back or in his trouser pockets while flicking the long tails on his coat back, with it being extremely rare for him to go an entire adventure without doing either. (TV: Terminus [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Dimensions in Time [+]John Nathan-Turner and David Roden, Doctor Who 30th anniversary special (BBC1, 1993)., Earthshock [+]Russell T Davies, Tales from the TARDIS (BBC iPlayer, 2023).) He was also known to occasionally place his hands in his coat pockets instead. (TV: Kinda [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).)

In a deviation from his stagnant posture, the Doctor would wring his hands together in a fidgety manner. (TV: Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Time-Flight [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Arc of Infinity [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Snakedance [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Enlightenment [+]Barbara Clegg, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983)., Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., The Awakening [+]Eric Pringle, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., Frontios [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., Resurrection of the Daleks [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) However, he would interlock his fingers when sitting or crouching down, (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Mawdryn Undead [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Terminus [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., The Awakening [+]Eric Pringle, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) or when he was in thought. (TV: Arc of Infinity [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).)

He crossed his arms when sulking (TV: Kinda [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982). ) or on the defensive, (TV: Terminus [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., The Awakening [+]Eric Pringle, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) and was prone to dramatic turns, which usually caused his hair to sway wildly. (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Kinda [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Time-Flight [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Snakedance [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Mawdryn Undead [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Terminus [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Enlightenment [+]Barbara Clegg, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983)., Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., The Awakening [+]Eric Pringle, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., Frontios [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984)., Resurrection of the Daleks [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).)

When in a stressful situation, he would scratch the back of his head as he worked on how to deal with the crisis, (TV: Arc of Infinity [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Enlightenment [+]Barbara Clegg, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) and would chew on the digits of his hand when thinking. (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Kinda [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Mawdryn Undead [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., The Awakening [+]Eric Pringle, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).)

When gobsmacked, he had a tendency to stare with a slack-jawed look on his face, (TV: Kinda [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Snakedance [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Enlightenment [+]Barbara Clegg, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) and would spread out his arms and look upwards to emphasis a point. (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Earthshock [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Snakedance [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).)

The Fifth Doctor often delegated some decisions to the simple chance of a coin flip. (TV: Kinda [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Time-Flight [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Enlightenment [+]Barbara Clegg, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., The Awakening [+]Eric Pringle, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).)

Skills[]

While he preferred to use trickery to solve a problem, (TV: Frontios [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) the Fifth Doctor was still very capable of defending himself unarmed when pushed to physical confrontations. (TV: Kinda [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Terminus [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) He retained the swordsmanship acumen of his predecessors, being able to best the Tremas Master in a duel, (TV: The King's Demons [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) and was also highly skilled at the sport of cricket, (TV: Black Orchid [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) being a "strong right arm bowler ". (AUDIO: The Council of Nicaea [+]Caroline Symcox, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2005).)

He was a proficient shot with a gun, even stating that he "never miss[ed]" his targets, (TV: The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Terminus [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983)., Resurrection of the Daleks [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) and also had the accuracy to throw a chair to jam a door, (TV: Terminus [+]Steve Gallagher, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) as well as being an expert marksman with a bow. (PROSE: The Immortals [+]Simon Guerrier, Short Trips: Past Tense (Short Trips, 2004).; AUDIO: Son of the Dragon [+]Steve Lyons, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2007).)

After learning how to, (COMIC: 4-Dimensional Vistas [+]Steve Parkhouse, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1983).) the Doctor was able to swim out of danger, even while dazed, and was capable of holding his breath for a long period of time. (TV: Warriors of the Deep [+]Johnny Byrne, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).)

The Doctor could perform hypnotism, (PROSE: Empire of Death [+]David Bishop, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2004).) and was able to make limited telepathic contact with the Xaranti. (PROSE: Deep Blue [+]Mark Morris, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1999).) He claimed to have "superior psychic defences", (AUDIO: Rat Trap [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.) and believed himself to be immune to hypnotism. (AUDIO: The Butcher of Brisbane [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

He could perform basic surgery, even with limited equipment. (TV: Frontios [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).)

The Doctor could determine the properties of something by taste alone, (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., The Visitation [+]Eric Saward, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Planet of Fire [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) and also possessed a heightened sense of smell, which he used to tell which time period he was in by smelling the air. (AUDIO: The Eye of the Scorpion [+]Iain McLaughlin, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2001).)

He could play the harp. (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who 20th Anniversary Special (Public Broadcasting Service, 1983).)

The Doctor was capable of driving a chariot, (AUDIO: The Eye of the Scorpion [+]Iain McLaughlin, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2001).) and could ride a horse. (AUDIO: The Church and the Crown [+]Cavan Scott and Mark Wright, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2002).)

The Doctor had a "gift for languages", (PROSE: Fear of the Dark [+]Trevor Baxendale, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2003).) and could speak to a Croatian in his native language. (AUDIO: Autumn [+]Paul Cornell, Circular Time (Main Range, Big Finish Productions, 2007).) He could also speak Greek. (AUDIO: Exotron [+]Paul Sutton, Main Range (Big Finish, 2007).)

The Doctor often showed keen observational and deductive skills, quickly solving the mystery of the murder of Sinead Iona Fleming on Fleming's Island fifty years after the crime, (AUDIO: Iterations of I [+]John Dorney, The Fifth Doctor Box Set (Big Finish Productions, 2014).) and managing to piece together the true nature of the Vrall from a few scattered clues relating to the anomalous behaviour of the translation circuit. (PROSE: Imperial Moon [+]Christopher Bulis, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2000).)

He learned how to perform coin magic from Adric, (TV: Kinda [+]Christopher Bailey, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) could recall and quote from scripture, (AUDIO: The Council of Nicaea [+]Caroline Symcox, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2005).) and carried a Molenski Univarius that he claimed could fix anything. (AUDIO: The Axis of Insanity [+]Simon Furman, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2004).)

Appearance[]

FiveThick

The Doctor wearing his hat. (TV: Black Orchid [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).)

The Fifth Doctor was a young man. (TV: Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) Peri Brown described him as having "fair blonde hair, blue eyes, and a sweet smile". (AUDIO: Peri and the Piscon Paradox [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

In an Multi-Doctor Event with the Tenth Doctor, the Fifth Doctor appeared noticeably older as a result of the time differential being shorted out, with the Tenth Doctor observing that his face was "saggier", his hair was "greyer", and suggesting that he had put on weight. The Tenth Doctor acknowledged that his fifth incarnation would return to normal once returned to his own time, quipping that he would be able to close his coat again. (TV: Time Crash [+]Steven Moffat, Doctor Who Children in Need Special 2007 (BBC One, 2007).) The Fifth Doctor also had an older appearance as one of the Guardians of the Edge, and when his image was adopted by the Holo-Doctor, which was remarked upon by Tegan Jovanka. (TV: The Power of the Doctor [+]Chris Chibnall, Doctor Who Centenary Special 2022 (BBC One, 2022).)

While he initially thought his new face represented "the trouble with [the unpredictability of] regeneration", the Fifth Doctor soon thought himself to be "absolutely splendid". (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).)

Rose Tyler considered the Fifth Doctor to be a "rather hot blond man" when Clive Finch showed her his picture. (PROSE: Rose [+]Russell T Davies, adapted from Rose (Russell T Davies), Target novelisations (Target Books, 2018).)

The Second Doctor playfully called his fifth incarnation "a youngster". (COMIC: Endgame [+]Scott & David Tipton, Prisoners of Time (IDW Publishing, 2013).)

When Affinity took on the Fifth Doctor's appearance to approach the Twelfth Doctor, he noted that the fifth incarnation was a "young fair-haired man in a pale coat and light striped trousers." (PROSE: Silhouette [+]Error: Code 2 - no data stored in variables, cache or SMW.)

Hair and grooming[]

As a side-effect of his regeneration, the Fifth Doctor's hair regularly changed length and colour. (PROSE: Cold Fusion [+]Lance Parkin, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1996).) It was brown shortly after his regeneration, (TV: Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) then quickly became platinum blonde. (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) On occasion, his hair had brown highlights (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).)

His hair typically reached to the back of his neck. (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) While it was originally poofy with a long fringe, (TV: Logopolis [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 18 (BBC1, 1981).) it quickly changed into a wavier style, (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).) though his fringe was later shown as shorter and his hairstyle kept straight. (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Terence Dudley, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).)

Once, to make himself appear older, the Doctor grew a beard while he was stranded in 1867 London that helped him fit in with the scientific community. (AUDIO: The Haunting of Thomas Brewster [+]Jonathan Morris, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2008).) He grew a beard again when he was forced to escape a prison through a time field that caused him to age a relative year while spending only a few minutes in it from an outside perspective. (AUDIO: Doing Time [+]William Gallagher, The Demons of Red Lodge and Other Stories (Main Range, Big Finish Productions, 2010).)

Clothing[]

Main attires[]

Cricket middle and leg

The Doctor plays cricket. (COMIC: The Tides of Time [+]Steve Parkhouse, DWM Comics (Marvel Comics, 1982).)

The Fifth Doctor's first outfit featured a beige frock coat with scarlet piping along the collar, lapels, sleeves, pockets and tails. Underneath his coat, the Doctor wore a cream cricket jumper with a crimson and black V-Neck pattern, and a white dress shirt with a red interior and embroidered cherry question marks on the collars. His trousers were a unique pattern of brown and beige stripes. He also wore white plimsolls and an ivory Panama hat that had a scarlet band with a black and white pattern. (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982).)

After his clothes were ruined by a Xaranti, (PROSE: Deep Blue [+]Mark Morris, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1999).) the Doctor changed to a French grey coat with a longer collar, a dress shirt with a green interior, trousers with thick orange lines, and a jumper with a pattern of thick red and black lines on the bottom, the V-Neck and sleeves. (TV: The Awakening [+]Eric Pringle, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) He sometimes wore suspenders adorned with question marks and, on one occasion, replaced his jumper with a beige coloured waistcoat that had a gold, white and red flora & fauna pattern. (TV: Planet of Fire [+]Peter Grimwade, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).)

He wore a stick of artificial celery on his left lapel (TV: Castrovalva [+]Christopher H. Bidmead, Doctor Who season 19 (BBC1, 1982)., Enlightenment [+]Barbara Clegg, Doctor Who season 20 (BBC1, 1983).) to alert him to his allergy to gases in the praxis range of the spectrum, as the celery would turn purple in their presence. (TV: The Caves of Androzani [+]Robert Holmes, Doctor Who season 21 (BBC1, 1984).) Ironically, the Doctor himself hated celery. (AUDIO: The Gathering [+]Joseph Lidster, Main Range (Big Finish Productions, 2006).)

Other costumes[]

Five Peri Nyssa DiT

The Doctor hides in Albert Square with Nyssa and Peri. (TV: Dimensions in Time [+]John Nathan-Turner and David Roden, Doctor Who 30th anniversary special (BBC1, 1993).)

The Fifth Doctor slept in white pyjamas, with tiny question mark motifs sewn on to them. (PROSE: Divided Loyalties [+]Gary Russell, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 1999).)

While combating the Rani's menagerie in Albert Square, the Doctor wore a cream cricket jumper with a triple V-Neck pattern consisting of a black on the top and bottom and a thick crimson line between two black lines in the middle. (TV: Dimensions in Time [+]John Nathan-Turner and David Roden, Doctor Who 30th anniversary special (BBC1, 1993).)

When his first incarnation was placed on trial in 1963 London as a result of killing a werewolf with a silver bullet, the Fifth Doctor dressed in an ill-fitting grey suit. (PROSE: The Juror's Story [+]Eddie Robson, Short Trips: Repercussions (Short Trips, 2004).)

While in Cairo, the Doctor wore khaki trousers and an off-white shirt. (PROSE: Never Seen Cairo [+]Darren Sellars, Short Trips: A Christmas Treasury (Short Trips short stories, 2004).)

Whilst on Karn with Peri, the Doctor donned a fur coat and boots, and also wore a black dress suit. As "the Supremo", he wore a black military uniform. (PROSE: Warmonger [+]Terrance Dicks, BBC Past Doctor Adventures (BBC Books, 2002).)

Whilst on the Crystal Bucephalus, he wore a puffy shirt and a blue cloak. (PROSE: The Crystal Bucephalus [+]Craig Hinton, Virgin Missing Adventures (Virgin Books, 1994).)

Behind the scenes[]

Casting[]

  • After the popularity of Tom Baker's Fourth Doctor, it was decided that the fifth incarnation would be played by an actor who was already firmly established in the British public's mind.
  • Richard Griffiths was considered for the role, as was Iain Cuthbertson.[1]
  • Peter Davison was eventually chosen to be the Fifth Doctor, due in no small part to his popular and critically acclaimed role as Tristan Farnon in All Creatures Great and Small, a BBC series based on the books of James Herriot.

Peter Davison's age[]

Costume details[]

Other matters[]

External links[]

Footnotes[]

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